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Hand Reaming and Drilling

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  • Hand Reaming and Drilling

    I sometimes find its easiest to grab a chucking reamer to clean up a hole
    and spin it by hand. No, not gripped between my finger tips. LOL.
    Occasionally I need to do something similar with a small drill bit. I've
    used a variety of things. One that works, but isn't very easy to get a good
    feel for is to grip the bit or reamer in a pair of locking pliers. I don't
    care for it much, but right now there are two drill bits locked in locking
    pliers hanging from the pegboard behind my tackle making bench.

    Today I needed to use a reamer to clean out some rather longish holes in a
    mold at an odd angle. I suppose I should have reamed them before I removed
    the plates from the angle vise, but (a) I forgot, and (b) I figured the
    drill bit that made the hole would have made it slightly oversized anyway.

    So I found myself using a .126 reamer by hand to clean out a core pin hole.
    I grabbed a small keyless chuck I acquired somewhere that has a 1/2" shank,
    and used it as a bit holder. It worked great. It might have been better if
    it had a big screw driver handle on it, but it was an order of magnitude
    better than using some locking pliers to hold the reamer. Now I can make
    such a contraption. It would be pretty easy. I've got three or four small
    drill chucks that are pretty decent, but then I thought. I can't be the
    only person to ever need to hand drive a small drill bit or a small reamer.
    I would think ideally a 1/4" (6.35mm) capacity keyless chuck on the end of a
    middle size screw driver would be ideal for this sort of work. Somebody
    must have made one already. Maybe a 3/8 or 1/2 would be handy, but I
    usually find myself dealing with this on the smaller bits and reamers.
    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

  • #2
    I keep the chucks from scrapped electric drills. They make an excellent grip for small drills and reamers. Not a big deal to adapt to a screwdriver handle. Start with a bolt that fits the threads in the back of the chuck. On a lathe drill and ream or bore to fit the shank of the screwdriver and part off. Silver braze or loctite the threaded sleeve onto the shank. For the smallest sizes I use a pin vise.
    Last edited by Illinoyance; 10-23-2017, 04:58 PM.

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    • #3
      I have a tap wrench that I use for that. The bar type, that closes with a twist on the handle. Works well, and obviously fits the reamers that have a square on the end.
      1601

      Keep eye on ball.
      Hashim Khan

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      • #4
        I have several screwdriver shanks, but no handles. The shanks are mostly from plastic handled drivers whose handles have exploded from age and degradation, or being hammered too often.

        I'd find it easier to fabricate a small T-handle, but it's a good idea I hadn't thought of before.

        I should also get round to making a long-handled tap wrench. I often want to tap a new hole, or clean an existing hole, that's way down a larger hole.
        Richard

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        • #5
          Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
          I sometimes find its easiest to grab a chucking reamer to clean up a hole
          and spin it by hand.

          ... I can't be the only person to ever need to hand drive a small drill bit or a small reamer.
          I would think ideally a 1/4" (6.35mm) capacity keyless chuck on the end of a
          middle size screw driver would be ideal for this sort of work. Somebody
          must have made one already. Maybe a 3/8 or 1/2 would be handy, but I
          usually find myself dealing with this on the smaller bits and reamers.
          1. Add a grip to a suitable bolt - done !



            These weren't built for your application, but they fit your description. No need to roll & weld rod to form a grip, a knurled/notched disk works just as well.
            .
          2. Take a sq drive socket set extension and modify the male end to accept a chuck. Then use a Palm Ratchet to drive the extension/chuck combo.

            Ratcheting action is a welcome improvement over a fixed grip.

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          • #6
            I should take a picture of what I use at work sometimes for large reamers.....or maybe I'd rather not have that kind of evidence floating around the net....

            We have set drills and reamers that live in cat40 holders and never come out (even the drill, I just sharpen them in there) from 0.3125" up to 1.375". These are for holes for drill jig bushings in fixtures. I like to ream to within 0.5-0.75 of the bottom of my hole depending on dia, and found that's a safe distance I can always count on to keep the chips from packing, binding up the reamer and chowdering my hole. Occasionally I'll need a hole reamed closer to the bottom than that, so Ill finish it by hand with a drill. What I did was turn the knob end off of an old pull stud, so I can screw it in the end and use the cat-40 holder to hold the reamer and finish reaming the hole all the way to the bottom. Simple fix, looks stupid, but works great.

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            • #7
              I have a couple of gadgets that look like this: https://www.mscdirect.com/product/details/86491990

              One looks exactly like that, but has a 1/4" capacity chuck, the other has a 1/4" Jacobs chuck on the handle.

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