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  • Die Starter Ideas

    After I roll my stainless U-bolts I have to thread each leg. What has happened in the past is it's difficult to start the die square to the rod. Sometimes I would get about 1/2" down the leg and see that the die is cocked a little. Sometimes you get lucky.

    I do have a set of bolt dies which allow for starting straight and square. The problem is I need about 3" of leg length to use the bolt die. If any shorter the guide end of the bolt die hits the bend in the U-bolt. Most of these U-bolts I'm making do not require legs that long. I don't want to thread 1 1/2" - 2" of leg just to start a straight thread. I was thinking of making some sort of simple die holder only a shorter version. Maybe out of a socket that fits the hex die. I could turn the back of the socket off and make a press in guide for the desired rod size. I could also use a round die and turn a starting holder. Any ideas???
    Is there something that I can buy??

    Here is a picture of a bolt die. You can see the overall length of it. I need a shorter version.

    JL.....................




    Found these at McMaster........ (the top two) Looks like a good start but these rely on the lathe for a straight start. Some slight modification would be needed since I don't need to drive the die in a lathe. But this gives you an idea of what I'm thinking of making.
    https://www.mcmaster.com/#threading-die-holders/=19yalr


    Last edited by JoeLee; 10-24-2017, 11:20 AM.

  • #2
    This may be the easiest and least expensive way out. All I would have to do is turn a short guide tube and tack weld it to the back of the holder and that would give ma a short version of the Ridgid bolt die.

    https://www.mcmaster.com/#25545a22/=19yap3b

    JL...............

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    • #3
      Take a piece of round stock and drill through lengthwise the diameter of your U-bolt material. Bore a pocket big enough to hold your round die.
      Cross drill and thread for a setscrew that engages the dimple in your die to lock it. Mill 4 flats on the outside so you can grab it with a wrench.
      Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RichR View Post
        Take a piece of round stock and drill through lengthwise the diameter of your U-bolt material. Bore a pocket big enough to hold your round die.
        Cross drill and thread for a setscrew that engages the dimple in your die to lock it. Mill 4 flats on the outside so you can grab it with a wrench.
        This is basically what I was thinking of doing unless I could buy something on this order. The stuff I posted from McMaster is the closest I could find.

        JL...............

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        • #5
          Mount your U-bolt upright to vise and use b-port/bench drill to spin the die holder. Straight and fast.
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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          • #6
            Can't you thread them before they are rolled?

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            • #7
              Originally posted by old mart View Post
              Can't you thread them before they are rolled?
              THIS.

              Seems the easy way to do it, assuming you can control the forming sufficiently well to make them come out even and not damage the threads.
              CNC machines only go through the motions

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              • #8
                Originally posted by old mart View Post
                Can't you thread them before they are rolled?
                Well, yes I can start at least one end before I roll it, but the way the roller is designed I need about 4" of rod on the starting leg to lock it down in the fixture. Again that leaves me with threading a couple inches of rod that will be cut off. So the die holder is still my best bet.

                JL.................

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                • #9
                  Tail stock die holder.
                  Fixture to hold U-bolt in 4-jaw chuck.
                  Align one leg to horizontal axis.
                  Feed tail stock to thread.
                  Flip the fixture 180*, repeat.
                  Last edited by bob_s; 10-24-2017, 02:31 PM. Reason: Spelling

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                  • #10
                    Other question...........I'm looking at some 1" round dies at McMaster. They have general purpose carbon steel dies, about $15 ea. and long life dies HSS about $31 ea. and also long life dies for stainless steel about $60 ea. I'm not going into production so would the general purpose dies work OK for 303 stainless. As long as they don't dull fast and leave a ratty thread cut after the first few u-bolts. I have to do maybe a dozen clamps, so that's 24 legs to thread about 1" of thread length each.

                    JL..................

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                    • #11
                      That is exactly what struck me. You may even be able to add a guide to an existing die holder by making it like a washer with the hole the same diameter as your stock. Find a way to attach it to the existing die holder in front of the die.



                      Originally posted by RichR View Post
                      Take a piece of round stock and drill through lengthwise the diameter of your U-bolt material. Bore a pocket big enough to hold your round die.
                      Cross drill and thread for a setscrew that engages the dimple in your die to lock it. Mill 4 flats on the outside so you can grab it with a wrench.
                      Paul A.
                      SE Texas

                      And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                      You will find that it has discrete steps.

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                      • #12
                        I would get the HSS die. It will do the job for sure, the carbon steel one may or may not.
                        Kansas City area

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                        • #13
                          A die can make drunken threads on straight stock. He really needs a way to guide the die. Of course, on straight stock he could single point the threads first and just use the die to finish up, but that would probably be too labor intensive for this situation. He needs something quick and dirty that gives a usable thread.

                          The big boys probably roll the threads first, then bend them.



                          Originally posted by old mart View Post
                          Can't you thread them before they are rolled?
                          Paul A.
                          SE Texas

                          And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
                          You will find that it has discrete steps.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Originally posted by JoeLee View Post

                            I'm looking at some 1" round dies at McMaster. They have general purpose carbon steel dies, about $15 ea. and long life dies HSS about $31 ea.

                            JL..................
                            Are you cutting at high speed? No? The high carbon steel will work great.. And coming from mcmaster it will be a good one. JR

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                            • #15
                              Ok; I am going to jump out of the box here and suggest an alternate approach.

                              It is that the U-bolts be formed in a press; rather then pulled around a bending die. The bottom of the die need only be a u-channel of suitable OD. The inner for the die need only be a pipe of suitable ID.

                              Strengthen the bottom die to stop it spreading. Strengthen the upper die by infill of the tube and add a flat for the press to push on.

                              It would need a "guide" to keep the bend true to the press; not sure if this is better in the upper or lower of the die pair.

                              Now ... given we have a mechanism that can press without damaging the threads, the threads can be added to the stock before bending.

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