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  • Making a replacement pulley for a mower

    I was trying to press off a pulley and it didn't go well. I broke the center out of it.

    I know I can cut a new one on the lathe but should I? The old pulley is cast. I thinking of getting a 6.5 round steel and start cutting or can I cut one out of plate steel? ie 6.5"x6.5"x1.25"

    The pulley is 1.25" tall only at the hub and 6.5" wide.





    And for those that say buy one I can't find one for the POS mower.

    Looking for thoughts.

  • #2
    I see no reason not to make one. I would start with a piece of plate. Torch or saw cut it round. Drill or bore 3 holes at 120* apart. The holes need to be big enough to accept the tips of your chuck jaws. Start turning.
    Wait! Is the pos mower worth the investment in time?

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    • #3
      Barely worth the investment. But I can't see buying a replacement. I already have the new spindle. I was thinking two holes and turning it between centers. The two holes for bolts to spin it. I like the plate thought. I have to do some looking at the place I buy from.

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      • #4
        I would machine it out of aluminum alot easier on tooling. Common sense says even though
        aluminum that is a hellava lot stronger than a rubber belt-right. Then turn it between centers.
        Think cast iron is a little over kill for what its going to do.
        What does "POS" mean 'push or stand' or something?

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        • #5
          Attach the plate to a faceplate with bolts and spacers, then turn, fliip to face and finish the other side.

          BigJob: POS, Piece of Sh!t.

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          • #6
            What does the pulley do? If it's a blade drive pulley, I wouldn't expect an aluminum version to last through a season. There's typically too much slippage when cutting high grass.

            Where are you located? And what's the bore on the pulley?

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            • #7
              If you make a drive pulley from alumnium, you spend its entire service life cleaning off the grey slime that forms on the surface as its abraded and dealing with slippage.

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              • #8
                That's what happens when you try to press a cast iron pulley off a shaft...... sometimes. You can't put the force to the outer edges of it and press the center.
                Sometimes if you heat them they'll come right off.
                You can't get close to the center when it's mounted on the bearing hub. The same thing would have happened if you used a puller.
                The centers are generally thin.
                I would get a cast iron blank and turn one. I've done it before.

                On a second thought. There are some companies that make pulley blanks, generally for like farm equipment.
                You may be able to find something close where all you would need to do is bore the hole and slot for the key.
                Or if you find the right dia. and cross section pulley blank you could make the hub and weld or bolt it to the pulley. I've done that before also. You can buy blank pulley hubs too.
                I bought them at out local Tractor Supply Store.

                McMater has some pulleys with bolt in bushings or hubs. Should be able to find something here.

                https://www.mcmaster.com/#v-belt-pulleys/=19za3rw

                https://www.mcmaster.com/#6209k233/=19za4v6

                Here's one that should work............ eBay item number: 302351690338

                JL................
                Last edited by JoeLee; 10-26-2017, 09:24 AM.

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                • #9
                  I have made a pulley before. It was for my old Simplicity garden tractor, the pulley from the starter/generator. I made it when I was an apprentice almost 40 years ago and it still looks good. I made it out of steel. At first I tried to single point the angles but they were rough when I cut them so a old timer let me use his tool bit that was ground for the job, I think it was 14 degrees on each side.

                  With that being said, I would take JoeLee's advice and see if you can find one that is close enough in size to take care of the belt area and bore the new one to fit your shaft. I'm pretty sure you can find something close.

                  Brian
                  OPEN EYES, OPEN EARS, OPEN MIND

                  THINK HARDER

                  BETTER TO HAVE TOOLS YOU DON'T NEED THAN TO NEED TOOLS YOU DON'T HAVE

                  MY NAME IS BRIAN AND I AM A TOOLOHOLIC

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                  • #10
                    Like Joe Lee advised, weld on pulleys and matching hubs are a viable solution. They are available in a large number of shaft/bore sizes along with a large number of hub styles and matching pulley sizes. Buy the appropriate hub and pulley, weld pulley onto hub, done.
                    I've used them for many applications and they are a fast cost effective solution.

                    Not saying that you can't or shouldn't make your own. It all comes down to if you want a project or if you just want to fix something and get it out of the shop today. It's all up to what your priorities are.





                    Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                    Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                    Location: British Columbia

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                    • #11
                      If you do machine a new pulley don't copy the original exactly. When making a cast part just enough material is used to make the part function. When machining from the solid only take off enough material to make the part function. Machining a look alike to the original wastes a lot of machine time.

                      Willy's suggestion of stamped pulleys with welded hubs is a good one. I had forgotten they were available. (along with a lot of other things I have forgotten) If one of the stock hubs will not fit, it is easy to make a hub.
                      Last edited by Illinoyance; 10-27-2017, 10:54 AM. Reason: added last paragraph

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Willy View Post
                        Like Joe Lee advised, weld on pulleys and matching hubs are a viable solution. They are available in a large number of shaft/bore sizes along with a large number of hub styles and matching pulley sizes. Buy the appropriate hub and pulley, weld pulley onto hub, done.
                        I've used them for many applications and they are a fast cost effective solution.

                        Not saying that you can't or shouldn't make your own. It all comes down to if you want a project or if you just want to fix something and get it out of the shop today. It's all up to what your priorities are.






                        I like this thought. I will most likely have to build my own hub. Nothing on this mower is normal.
                        The blades spin clockwise (looking from under up), The bolt that holds the blade is left handed metric, the hubs are no standard, and...

                        I like the thought cutting the whole thing for the strength.

                        As far as when I was removing it. I had a bearing support under it... I also had heat going...

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