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CNC Knurling tool

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  • John Stevenson
    replied
    The knurling tool is not very well described.
    It's made by an Austrian firm called Quick at Innsbrook.
    I have found some details but no UK agents.
    I suspect that the knurls being propiatry are expensive but that doesn't matter now as I've made some new bearing sleeves up to accept the recessed side knurls that are freely available all over.
    I bought a pair of straight course knurls from J&L for آ£12 each and also course and medium LH helicals for some experimentation to make a straight knurl holder.

    More on this later with pics.

    The boring head is a Austrian Kaiser head and the taper is special to them.
    I have no idea if it fits some kind of jig borer they make but they do make adaptor sleeves to R8, various types of quick fit 30 taper and also BT, CAT and ISO 40 tapers.

    Until I get this I don't know what taper it has, I supect it's smaller than the two I already have on two other Kaiser boring and facing heads but an adaptor is only a simple turning, boring and tapping exercise.

    ------------------
    John S.
    Nottingham, England

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    Dunno if its the same brand but a cut-knurling holder is about$645 here,so yes you did steal it

    Thats a spiffy looking boring head,but whats with the external thread?Some kind of oddball retention device?

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Weird,
    I have bought some new knurls for it, that's what the pics were.
    Anyway I didn't steal it 51 quid is a lot here.

    Here's a steal

    http://cgi.ebay.co.uk/ws/eBayISAPI.d...tem=3832801289


    ------------------
    John S.
    Nottingham, England

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    John,seeing as how you stole that knurling tool,you should at least buy a set of knurls Poor buggers that made it are probibly hungry

    Leave a comment:


  • Alistair Hosie
    replied
    huh when did you ever own a clean pair of jeans?.or scants for that matter will phone u tomorrow

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Jones
    replied
    Here's a tip that really works with them cards for cameras...well it's worked everytime for me ...
    take it out lick the gold area .....then wipe it on a clean pair of jeans.
    Plonk it back in your camera or card reader and bingo its fixed.
    all the best.....mark

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Damn it,
    Just rushed in from the shop, full of good news and cheer and the bloody memory stick on the camera has got Altzhimers.
    Either that or the rain has washed the pictures off in the mad dash from the workshop.

    Later, gotta find me a torch and go look for the pictures that's slid off the memory stick......must be on the path........

    ------------------
    John S.
    Nottingham, England

    Leave a comment:


  • gglines
    replied
    spope14:

    I use the Eagle Rock knurler on my manual lathe and get good results. I'd be interested in your system you mentioned if you wouldn't mind sharing?

    Thanks,

    George

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Just made the spacers to accept the knurls I have. Paul is right, these cut on the very edge so I faced them off on the surface grinder to get rid of the chamfer and leaft a sharp edge.
    No problem with being hard as knurl wheels are High Speed Steel.
    Works OK now but up to a limit.

    The original wheels were 20mm diameter, the ones I have are only 5/8" so it's cocked up the settings dial and I can't get below about 3/4" diameter but it's now cutting an equal knurl with hardly any pressure to speak of as it only uses a knife edge.
    Running at 300 rpm with a very fast feed, probably ten times what a pressure knurl will stand, one pass.

    Photo's later, got a large rotor snapped in two and that pays better but I'll order some better knurls tonight from J&L and play again later.
    I'm impressed enought to want to go for a single straight knurl design like in the second link I posted.

    ------------------
    John S.
    Nottingham, England

    Leave a comment:


  • Paul Alciatore
    replied
    I always see something new and interesting here.

    Price sounds a bit steep for my pocketbook.

    So, are those standard knurls? It looks like their edges are actually being used as cutting tools. Wouldn't they have to be sharpened for this? Or do they just "plow through"?

    Let us know how it works with new knurls.

    Paul A.

    Leave a comment:


  • John Stevenson
    replied
    Just got the tool this morning and had a quick play before I had to go out.
    I know the knurl wouldn't be any good as it has odd wheels in.
    I was more concerned about what pressure was needed.
    Plunged in at the end of a 1" bar and fed along, hardly any pressure needed as it's only touching on the very edges of the wheels.

    As it feeds you can see little chips being thrown off.
    Put flood coolant on and set the speed for 300 rpm and it was cutting nice.
    Did about an inch and as expected one hand is courser than the other but taking each hand seperatly they are very clean and well defined.

    There are two adjustments on this one, diameter from 1/8" up to 10" which alters the helix angle and a push / push setup with two locking screws to centralise on the work.

    I need to make a couple of small spacers up to handle the knurl wheels I have and have another try later.

    ------------------
    John S.
    Nottingham, England

    Leave a comment:


  • spope14
    replied
    For CNC Knurling, or even manul, that is a good tool, but centering on a manual machine to get the "perfect knurl" is hard on a manual.

    I also prefer the "Eagle rock" Scissor knurl for maunal lathes, I can knurl anything perfectly, have a little system I use that I can share sometime for the eagle rocks. 99% of my knurls come out perfect, on anything from tool steel to aluminum to delrin. The seceret is "touch", and plenty of cutting fluids.

    As for CNC, I also use a "bump Knurl", much like the old "armstrong' type, that has the head that rocks or "self centers". The secret on CNC Knurling with these bad boys is the feed into the part, and multi passes that allow the knurler to find its center and "timing', then on my back and forth passes, allows for cutting and the pressing, and gives time for the materials to "work in".

    I love knurling and threading.


    Sounds slow, actually very quick

    Leave a comment:


  • DR
    replied
    Uh, David?

    "Major tool purchases... WHOO HOOO..... "

    Toys to play with? What the heck are you talking about? In my locale the prices you paid would constitute a felony.

    Leave a comment:


  • ibewgypsie
    replied
    DO you know I envy you cause you got more toys to play with than I do.

    At least you are on the other side of the pond so you can't rub it in person.. HA..



    [This message has been edited by ibewgypsie (edited 11-09-2005).]

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  • DR
    replied
    John,

    I've tried without much success to use the Hardinge version of cut knurling tool. Of course, it isn't as fancy as yours. On the Hardinge tool the wheels are not as easily adjustable.

    My worst results were in aluminum, but aluminum is a very difficult material to cleanly knurl. (Occasionally I make some high end knurled musical instrument parts, until I got into those parts I assumed aluminum was a piece of cake which it isn't. Since these parts I've come to notice aluminmum knobs, very few are knurled, most are extruded with straight "knurl" pattern).

    In my experience nothing beats the opposed knurl type setup, a quick pass at high feedrate and you've got perfect knurls everytime. My favorite is one off a B&S screw machine. For engine lathe work my favorite is the scissor type from Eagle Rock.

    Leave a comment:

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