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Can Teflon be machined to a very fine finish?

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  • #16
    Originally posted by Lee in Texas View Post
    Many of these alternate ideas have merit, but make it kind of a bummer that the Teflon plate was 75 bucks after shipping.
    You should have came hear first!!!

    THANX RICH
    People say I'm getting crankier as I get older. That's not it. I just find I enjoy annoying people a lot more now. Especially younger people!!!

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    • #17
      Can you make the roller from wax? Maybe a large round candle.
      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
      USA Maryland 21030

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      • #18
        Maybe a smaller diameter roller would work. I relate this to using wax paper. If you roll out putty using wax paper, when you peel it you pull at a sharp angle. If you pull at a shallow angle, it wants to lift the putty. Something about directing more force to a smaller surface area.

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        • #19
          If you're using glass micro-balloons mixed with epoxy to make the putty then cling film (e.g. Saran Wrap) works well. Rather than a roller you might use a credit card to squeegee over the cling film to adjust the thickness of the putty. The cling film can be removed by pulling at a very low angle, i.e. folding right back along the surface - leaves a smooth surface. Depending on the pattern you're going to imprint, the film can be left in place to avoid the putty sticking to the imprinter, then removed after the epoxy sets up somewhat. If you want to leave a surface for later bonding then fine weave Dacron cloth (aka peel-ply) can be used and left in place until the epoxy cures before removal.

          Some epoxies cure leaving a slight film of clear alkaline material on the surface which may provoke contact dermatitis when handled and especially if sanded. Also, paint doesn't adhere well to this film. Washing the surface with a little vinegar in water removes this film if it's present.
          Location: Newtown, CT USA

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          • #20
            I would try a card scraper.

            I mean, card scrapers have been used for finishing wood to a smooth, burnished, almost polished appearing finish for centuries, I would imagine it would work on teflon quite similarly as teflon has that sort of brittleness that responds to scraping type cutting.

            I would have tried a sheet of silicone before teflon, though. I know 2 part epoxy glue doesn't stick to silicone brushes, and worst case scenario you could always lift up the silicone sheet and peel the epoxy layer off, while maintaining its thickness. You could probably even cut the epoxy to shape directly on the silicone mat.

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            • #21
              I have used some .014" mylar sheet for vacuum bagging fiberglass directly to foam for RC racing airplanes. It is super slick and when a coat of carnuba wax is applied to the sheet it peals right off the cured fiberglass. I still have some around here somewhere. PM me if you would like to try some. You could use your teflon roller to roll your epoxy on the mylar.
              Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
              Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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              • #22
                I donĀ“t *know* the answer .. but very cold has been a common solution in industry.

                Also, I had a client who tapped holes in plastics - clear as glass.
                He used liquid parafin of some type as cutting fluid (liquid candle wax not gas).

                Some plastics are flame polished to be very clear- amateur examples online.
                Maybe try the teflon makers ?

                They usually have experts as applications engineers, are free, and their jobs are to support major contracts but often help anyone who calls with a "real interesting" question.

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                • #23
                  Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
                  That's why i brought up the armor-all

                  heard it from a body shop guy it's one of his worst nightmares is when people use it on their cars trim and get some on the paint, years later and even though you scuff and prep the painted surface the new paint will not stick,
                  That crap should be illegal. My wife was inspired to take the car for "detailing" and they ArmorAlled the dashboard, so that the sun glares off it now. I'm disgusted.
                  Location: Jersey City NJ USA

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