Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Projects: Machine shop, storage, work areas, computer and electronics lab areas

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #16
    Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
    What the heck is that thing on the bottom???
    Who are you asking? And about what?
    CNC machines only go through the motions

    Comment


    • #17
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      Who are you asking? And about what?
      Ah. I see now... apologies. Asking BobinOK about his pics. . It's right there, under the boxes in the middle-front, in this picture.


      Last edited by Zahnrad Kopf; 10-28-2017, 02:26 PM.

      Comment


      • #18
        Oh... I remember that! I think I recall it being called a "floor"....
        Chilliwack BC, Canada

        Comment


        • #19
          Originally posted by BobinOK View Post
          More photos.....
          YOU FLY CONTROL LINE STUNT! ? ! ? You, Sir, are one of the rare ones.....

          Looks like one of the new fangled electric models. I don't see an engine cylinder or exhaust.
          Chilliwack BC, Canada

          Comment


          • #20
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            Oh... I remember that! I think I recall it being called a "floor"....
            Ohhhhhhh.... I've heard about those! Evasive buggers, they are. Haven't seen ours in so long I'd forgotten what they look like.

            Comment


            • #21
              Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
              Why didn't I think of that? I sure like the 4-plug outlets. I may have to change a few boxes. I've been using a couple of "Triple-Taps" to extend use. They're not all used at the same time but typically three or more electric tools used one after the other and repeat. It sure is troublesome to unplug and plug tools. A couple of light boxes could use those too. Duh.

              <palm slap to forehead>
              As long as you're slapping your forehead you know that they have two three and even four ganged switch boxes, right? And I may be wrong but I don't see why you can't have a three gang box holding three outlets for 6 sockets.

              They have bits and pieces sticking out through. Really intended for in wall flush use. The boxes Paul shows are really for making connections. They aren't really the right size for taking switches or outlets. So you need to buy the covers he shows that hold the two outlets. Or switches or an outlet and a switch.
              Chilliwack BC, Canada

              Comment


              • #22
                Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                ....

                I may also need to redo some of the electrical work. The guy who installed it said he did a lot of electrical work and he seemed to know what he was doing, but as I am now trying to trace the wiring in order to wire the upstairs, I find some things that seem troubling, like this:



                ....
                What bothers me is 2 things.

                1) Box fill. Lots of wires, may be too many for the box volume

                2) Derating of wires and conduit fill at the left. I see several black wires. Rating of wires is reduced when there are more than 3 current carrying wires in a raceway/conduit.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

                Comment


                • #23
                  Re: holding tools at rear of bench. I have a plastic tool tidy only because it was given to me but a better method is a piece of 2in hole wire mesh left over from making eg animal cage or window security. Say 3 squares deep set horizontal then partly overlaid with 1in and 1/2 in size. Loads of holes for screwdrivers etc to be slotted into it.
                  similar to the metal trays mentioned earlier I rescued a set of drawers 6ft high designed for computer punched cards way back in the '60s. They were designed to have one of the cards slotted into the front of the drawer on which you printed the contents. I even found from my student days a few cards to put in them.

                  Comment


                  • #24
                    What I do not like is angle shelving brackets. Any weight on them and, as you say, you need more screws. I either scratch build a (rough and ready) cabinet to stack stuff on - high as I like, I'm no purist - or I put up metal floor to ceiling shelving - the common brand name is Spur in the UK, or if I know what I want where, I weld up a series of shelf brackets on vertical 3/16" x 3/4" stock, each with a short support strut.

                    In the case of commercial shelving, I like to anchor the tops behind a bit of ceiling so that if the worst happens it might drop a little but it won't fall forward.

                    If I've got a shelf, I like to think of it as something I can put stuff on without weighing it first. Like stock, taper adaptors, chucks, castings, tools, stuff I can only just lift. If I've got six shelves, and 15 inches of shelf width gets one item of, say, 50 lbs, that means a five foot width wall unit has 50x6x3 or almost 1000 lbs. Hang that on a bunch of angle brackets if you like. It's like having two motorcycles hanging on the wall.

                    Alternatively, UK dexion - vertical corners with folded edge sheet steel shelves wont go far wrong, although even that needs a screw or two to hold it to the wall.

                    I like your reclaimed drawer unit. I've got one cabinet of 12 drawers like that, with a stack of spare drawers. The spares take short stock. They came from computer card trays from the seventies. I get nervous about the loading on my concrete floor, but you've got to stack it in somewhere.
                    Richard - SW London, UK, EU.

                    Comment


                    • #25
                      Some very impressive shops and many good ideas that may help as I progress on my long-term project. I do have some heavy duty metal shelf units that should fit well under those drawer cabinets. I can probably use the one shown here, which is holding the other shelf unit in my leaky old metal shed. The left corner is badly rusted and will need some repair. I've neglected a lot of things over the years, for a variety of reasons, largely due to my orthopedic issues and surgery, but now finally I feel well enough to tackle these projects.



                      Here are more metal drawers, some of which have electronic components in them, along with active mouse nests. I was able to salvage most of the components and the drawers cleaned up pretty well. This is a "before" picture:



                      Another "before" picture, showing mostly resistors, and one drawer with several hundred steel can TO-66 2N6312 PNP transistors:



                      The drawers are sitting on the rough wooden steps to access the shed, which sits up about 4 feet from the ground. It is built into a steep hill between my two houses, on part of the foundation of an old wooden shed that was on the property when I bought it in 1977, and it may have dated back to when the house was built, around 1877.

                      I sprayed some green detergent/degreaser into the drawers along with hot water and I used a stiff brush to clean up the mouse crap and rust. I was surprised to see bright plated metal under some of the paint that came off. It may be tin or bright zinc:

                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment


                      • #26
                        If you have to use steel shelf brackets at least use the ones with the 45 degree round brace welded in, much stronger.

                        Comment


                        • #27
                          Some of that stuff looks like it would not be a bad choice to say it's had it's day and now it's off to the scrap bin.

                          I know this is a HOME shop forum and we do things that we enjoy BECAUSE we enjoy them. And certainly making our shops fun and fast to work in is part of that. But as folks told me a lot during my retirement shop building project "remember what you're doing this for. Stop making "stuff" to make more "stuff" and just make "STUFF"! " And it does make sense when taken in context. The idea of the shop is to make "stuff". But if we spend too long on the SHOP then we get to the end with a list of really cool projects that are supposed to make it OUT of the shop that never did get built.

                          So don't feel like you can't use a little "tough love" on some of those things you have. Like the bins with terminal rust or the shelf for the bins that is structurally at risk. At some point it may be worth salvage the trays that are good and use those for the one good shelf unit and send the rest out to scrap. Use the time on some other task.

                          I know that the packrat in ALL of us (I'm not immune by any stretch) shudders at such a thought. But look at the time you get back and the room that can be used for something that doesn't need days of de-rusting and repairs. Especially if you don't really have anything specific to put in those rusty'er drawers.
                          Last edited by BCRider; 10-29-2017, 12:08 AM.
                          Chilliwack BC, Canada

                          Comment


                          • #28
                            There is also the factor of cost, and availability.

                            Some things if bought new to replace old, cost far more than their actual utility justifies. It's no fun if the shop costs too much...... no money for tools.

                            Some things are simply not available, or may be available but only at immense cost. If you HAVE some of those but they need work.... Then if you can spend a little time getting them cleaned up, you may save a LOT of money, and avoid having to buy inferior stuff new.

                            Saved money is more money for tools.

                            O do not think anyone makes that type of drawer that fits metal shelving (heck, they do not even make the shelving), and if they actually do, I suppose they will not be cheap...... He HAS the drawers, and the time to clean them up for use.
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 10-29-2017, 12:29 AM.
                            CNC machines only go through the motions

                            Comment


                            • #29
                              I agree that the drawer cabinets are close to a "lost cause", but I rather enjoy being able to salvage things like this, and it will eventually help me organize a lot of my "stuff" that is presently so scattered and hidden deep in piles that I usually can't find what I need. Sometimes it's good to have a relatively mindless task like this, and it helps me feel less discouraged and overwhelmed when i can make fairly quick progress on something that has an easily achieved goal. I found that the same Equipto shelf units sell for over $350 each, for the 24 drawer variety:

                              http://www.globalindustrial.com/p/st...th-office-gray

                              It's also interesting to find things from the past that I had forgotten about or thought were lost. Here is a "computer" I made when I was probably about 10 years of age. It uses multi-pole rotary switches that add three numbers and displays the result on one of 10 6V pilot lights. It was wired without solder because I was afraid of the hot iron. I called the thing "Computac":





                              Here is a very old lantern that I found recently. My father had wired it to use a special NiCad battery and charger to replace the original two large doorbell batteries. The battery leaked. It's not very useful, but it is an antique.



                              And here is an old ultrasonic cleaner that I got from my dentist. I fixed a couple of newer ones for him, but this one is badly corroded and dirty. I cleaned it up but it needs some body work, and I don't know if the electronics are operational. A future project, perhaps:



                              These just show how I like to salvage things that are probably not really worth saving, but still satisfying to see the transformation.
                              http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                              Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                              USA Maryland 21030

                              Comment


                              • #30
                                Originally posted by Zahnrad Kopf View Post
                                Ohhhhhhh.... I've heard about those! Evasive buggers, they are. Haven't seen ours in so long I'd forgotten what they look like.
                                I've been doing a better job at keeping my floor clean ever since I got a Roomba. It's got its own idea of where things should go and I have to make sure the floor is safe for it to do its job. Sure beats vacuuming, though, and I don't even hear it because it's set to work when I'm gone.

                                I'm not sure it'd be a good idea in the shop... Definitely not around any chip/sawdust making tools. The capacity is just too small.

                                Comment

                                Working...
                                X