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Projects: Machine shop, storage, work areas, computer and electronics lab areas

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  • #31
    Originally posted by BCRider View Post
    Some of that stuff looks like it would not be a bad choice to say it's had it's day and now it's off to the scrap bin.

    I know this is a HOME shop forum and we do things that we enjoy BECAUSE we enjoy them. And certainly making our shops fun and fast to work in is part of that. But as folks told me a lot during my retirement shop building project "remember what you're doing this for. Stop making "stuff" to make more "stuff" and just make "STUFF"! " And it does make sense when taken in context. The idea of the shop is to make "stuff". But if we spend too long on the SHOP then we get to the end with a list of really cool projects that are supposed to make it OUT of the shop that never did get built.

    So don't feel like you can't use a little "tough love" on some of those things you have. Like the bins with terminal rust or the shelf for the bins that is structurally at risk. At some point it may be worth salvage the trays that are good and use those for the one good shelf unit and send the rest out to scrap. Use the time on some other task.

    I know that the packrat in ALL of us (I'm not immune by any stretch) shudders at such a thought. But look at the time you get back and the room that can be used for something that doesn't need days of de-rusting and repairs. Especially if you don't really have anything specific to put in those rusty'er drawers.
    I can really relate to this post... I find myself researching projects for making stuff to make stuff that I think I might need some day. It usually starts with reading a post and thinking it would be neat to have a gizzy that does that. Latest venture came from reading about the step indexer down in the digital forum. That turned into thinking of using the spindle from a mini lathe $42.00 and change from Little Machine Shop, couple bearings and a chunk of 3X3 aluminum (about $50.00 on line). Reason for the mini lathe spindle is I have a chuck and set of Collets I kept when I sold my 7x14. Now over a hundred bucks and several hours for something I might use once in the next 5 years. But it would be neat to build and have. I'll probably never build it but was fun to think about.

    Instead of thinking about stuff to build so I can build stuff I really need to be thinking about and working on several projects I already have in the pipe line. Adding top and tilt hydraulics to my Ford 3600 tractor, rebuilding the main shaft on my John Deere planter and a couple others I already have purchased the main components for. I need to get out in the shop and quit reading this forum

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    • #32
      Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
      What bothers me is 2 things.

      1) Box fill. Lots of wires, may be too many for the box volume

      2) Derating of wires and conduit fill at the left. I see several black wires. Rating of wires is reduced when there are more than 3 current carrying wires in a raceway/conduit.
      Yep.. That would be red-tagged around here on both counts (assuming was not fed with derated breakers and the over-filled conduit is not just a stub and exceeds certain minimum length). You can put an extension box on the existing for increased volume, but then you might not have the required stick-out out of the wires. A big problem when and inspector sees that type of installation is that he/she knows it wasn't installed competently and will now start to look at everything else.

      Inspection... ok, so you don't necessarily get it inspected, but you should build it to code.

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      • #33
        One thing I did that worked slick was to suspend some shelving from the ceiling above the automatic garage door when it is opened. Door can still operate, and useless dead space is made useable. Great storage for the seldom accessed stuff... about 2' of vertical space.

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        • #34
          Originally posted by lakeside53 View Post
          ....

          Inspection... ok, so you don't necessarily get it inspected, but you should build it to code.
          Code is code for a reason. And notice that the code is put out by the "National Fire Protection Association". That should be a hint.

          When boxes are overfilled, the heat in them increases, and there is a much better chance for damage to wires. Ditto for overfilled conduits, and conduits (raceways in NFPA-speak) with the wires not derated.

          Shouldn't the breaker and equipment grounding conductor protect you if there is a problem resulting from the violation?

          Yes, that is true. But, that is no reason to create a problem... breakers and other things fail sometimes. You do it to code, the chances of ever NEEDING the overcurrent protection or EGC are far lower.

          Also, when you find things are not done to code, the chances of the protective equipment NOT working is higher, because the installer may not have installed THOSE items correctly either.

          Doing things to code makes life easier all around. I know of places where the homeowner added uninspected stuff done 100% to code, and later on when a contractor did work and hooked to that uninspected wiring, there was no problem no questioning, etc. And some others where just the opposite occurred. The inspector would not approve connecting, and quite a bit of work had to be re-done just to allow the new construction to be connected.
          Last edited by J Tiers; 10-29-2017, 02:30 PM.
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #35
            Originally posted by softtail View Post
            One thing I did that worked slick was to suspend some shelving from the ceiling above the automatic garage door when it is opened. Door can still operate, and useless dead space is made useable. Great storage for the seldom accessed stuff... about 2' of vertical space.
            Mine is an extra wide double. The header beam over the opening is already showing some sag when I look along it. So I chose not to use that area. After all whatever is on that shelf is adding to the load.

            It's a SUPERB idea for any garage with a single door and sturdy header showing no sag though.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #36
              BC, mine is (was) the same. 16ft wide. I just converted it to 10ft and a man/pass through door. I'm not too proud to admit that I'm damn excited about it.
              I store big lite items on the shelves.. coolers, etc.

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              • #37
                Hi Paul,

                I have 2 sets of the same parts drawers that you show. I too wanted them over a work bench side by side, I took the sides and bolted together and added angle iron up to the ceiling and attached them to a 2x4 that spans multiple ceiling joists to disperse the weight. I too have screws, nails and other misc. hardware in them, along with lathe tooling which is what it hangs over. Also I added a 2x4 cleat on the underside at the wall to hold the back bottom edge, I attached it with long lag bolts with screws that hold the cabinet to it. So, I have to agree the present method is a bit scary for the given weight, but there is a way to make it hold and give the bench space, go up to secure it. Iv'e had it this way for a couple of years with no problems.

                TX
                Mr fixit for the family
                Chris

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                • #38
                  Originally posted by softtail View Post
                  BC, mine is (was) the same. 16ft wide. I just converted it to 10ft and a man/pass through door. I'm not too proud to admit that I'm damn excited about it.
                  I store big lite items on the shelves.. coolers, etc.
                  Nice!

                  While I don't have that sort of shelf I did install a suspended light duty 4x8 foot platform to use for mounting the lights that go over the center island and mill as well as storage for light items just like you describe. The heaviest thing on that middle platform is the stereo for the shop.

                  But yeah, other than these sorts of things generally the words "machine shop" and "lightweight" are pretty much mutually exclusive. Sort of like "military intelligence". So one need to think about how to connect just about everything in our shops down to the floor. Or in my case the handy foundation ledge that is up just under 5 1/2 feet off the floor which takes the rear of the upper cabinets.

                  Which would be why I was nodding in agreement as I read your post Mr Fixit.
                  Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                  • #39
                    Originally posted by PStechPaul View Post
                    I'm not sure how to label the drawers. I have an old Dymo label-maker but I don't know if tapes are still available. I also have a couple of Brother label printers. I'll probably start with simple paper adhesive labels with hand lettering.

                    As for labeling stuff, I rescued an older version of one of these on it's way to the trash at a place I used to work:

                    https://www.amazon.com/DYMO-LabelWri...9NHQHGQNYH9XDH

                    If you order labels on-line (I used a place called labelvalue.com or something similar) they are very inexpensive compared to buying them at a place like Staples, etc. They sell both paper labels and much more robust permanent ones for labeling lab bottles and library books and the like. Lots of different sizes as well. It is much cheaper than the ones that use the tape cartridges.

                    As an aside, Dymo actually still sells a version of your embossing labeler as well as the tape. Look here:

                    http://www.dymo.com/en-US/label-make...ice-mate-ii--1

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                    • #40
                      Those paper labels can be a PITA to remove later. A permanent felt pen stays in place nicely. If the color isn't too dark then just write directly on the front. If it is dart then put on some light color paint or a paper label covered over with clear packing tape. Then use your felt pen.

                      If things change at some point a bit of paper towel with some rubbing alcohol makes short work of erasing the felt marker.

                      The new label printers are really nice. But for what they charge for the cartridges I'm not sure I could afford to do every spot through the shop with it So I use other methods. Including felt pen on masking tape which is then stuck onto the big Rubbermaid storage totes.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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                      • #41
                        Per labeling, many of those drawers have a label card holder on the front. Presumably yours do not, although in the pics there looks to be something there. Might just be tape residue.

                        For that kind, which I have a few of, I just use masking tape and a felt tip black marker. The tape gets dry after many years, but I do not change the contents very much.

                        My experience is that felt marker DOES NOT come off of paint..... There is always a light but visible mark, which can be a hassle when scanning the shelves for what you want. Since you have only a few drawers, that may not be an issue.
                        CNC machines only go through the motions

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                        • #42
                          Well, I do have two cabinets and a total of 72 drawers, so that's hardly 'a few". I may have some adhesive address labels for a printer, but the sticky has probably become "not-sticky". I also need to label the drawers in my rolling tool cabinet and other things like small plastic drawer organizers. Maybe I should use my Brother label printer to make nice labels - it might inspire me to take more pride in my workshop. Compatible labels are available through Walmart four 12mm x 8m cassettes for $13.48. Staples wants $21 for a single cassette! Each drawer is about 8 cm so one cassette would do 100 drawers.

                          I worked on the other cabinet today. It was badly rusted in one corner:



                          I found a piece of fairly heavy gauge galvanized steel that was the exact width needed:



                          I used my hand nibbling shear to cut to length:



                          I bent a flange by using my vise, some vise-grips, and a ball peen hammer:



                          I still need to finish wire-brushing and painting the cabinet and the rest of the drawers. Then I'll figure out how to set them up safely. I agree that wall mounting would not be adequate for the weight. Another phase of this project for another day. I'm trying to finish up the de-rusting and spray painting while the weather is still warm and dry enough.
                          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                          USA Maryland 21030

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                          • #43
                            A few pop rivets, and the cabinet is solid enough to function:



                            Some grey primer makes it look presentable. Still more work to be done, but I feel good that this was salvageable.

                            http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                            Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                            USA Maryland 21030

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                            • #44
                              I have been working on building up my shop for months now. One thing I do recommend is to find a bench for everything you want to do and keep the jobs separate.

                              The other advise I can give is to clean up after each working session. Put all tools back and put the project in a case/crate/box and store it. I still violate this rule in my shop, however the more time passes the less I violate the rule.

                              Also as others have mentioned. Either use storage that is sitting on the floor or is at least easily movable to remove dust and debris. Sweeping the shop floor should be the last thing before hanging up the apron. I am also in the process of installing a stainless sink in the shop. I think it will come in more than handy in the future.

                              EDIT: This is my bench. Check my instagram for more pics of the shop.

                              Last edited by engineerd3d; 10-31-2017, 05:20 PM.
                              12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
                              Logan 825 - work in progress
                              My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
                              Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
                              Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

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                              • #45
                                My "electronics lab" is always a mess. Here is a photo from a few weeks ago that I think I posted earlier for something but can't recall:

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