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  • Air compressor drain

    The small line in the picture is my air tank drain, however that leaves one problem. I usually drain it into a small container, but no matter how carefull it is done, half the time the rust colored water ends up everywhere when the air comes through.

    http://community.webshots.com/photo/...76005262QFZBYX

    What do you folks do?

    [This message has been edited by JPR (edited 08-16-2004).]
    John

  • #2
    We have our line at work running directly outside, dont know if this is possible for you or helps.

    Comment


    • #3
      The water coming out should be clear, not rust colored.
      How often do you drain it?
      Mine drains for 3 seconds every 45 minutes, automatically. On humid days I adjust it to 5 second blows.
      Nothing but clear water comes out.

      Les

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      • #4
        I drain it once or twice an evening.

        Yours is on an automatic drain?
        John

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        • #5
          Once or twice an evening should be adequate.

          Mine is an automatic drain. I think it is an Optima brand 110V powered that is adjustable for interval and duration of drain. It has worked perfectly for 2-1/2 years now. I don't remember what it cost though.
          I don't want to have to remember to drain the tank. I have too many other things to try to remember to do.

          Les

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          • #6
            Run the line to a closed container or better yet a floor drain or outside.

            I've done a lot of compressor systems and most do have rust in the water. Usually means the inside of the tank is rusting. Never had one rust through. I think the oil from the compressor helps to slow it down.

            Paul A.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

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            • #7
              Can't tell from your photo but I like a drain that I can crack open slowly. Makes a big difference in the mess it creates.

              Use a gallon milk jug. Leave the cap on. Make two more holes in the top. One a tight fit around the drain the other 2 or three inches in dia.stuffed full of steel wool.(aluminiun if you can find it.)

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              • #8
                Can't tell from your photo but I like a drain that I can crack open slowly. Makes a big difference in the mess it creates.

                Use a gallon milk jug. Leave the cap on. Make two more holes in the top. One a tight fit around the drain the other 2 or three inches in dia.stuffed full of steel wool.(aluminiun if you can find it.)

                Comment


                • #9
                  I don't know how big your compressor is, but mine is a little 30 gallon 5 hp. I take a shop rag or a wad of paper towels and put it under the drain when I drain it(after every use).Then toss the mess. No large nasty stains on the floor.

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                  • #10
                    The compressors at work we have a clear poly hose running to outside with a ball valve mounted on the wall,when we shut down the pump,I flip the valve and blow down the tank,no sweat,dumps about a gallon in mid summer.

                    On the tank rust thing,best thing to do is drop the moisture BEFORE it gets to the tank,all it takes is a little plumbing and a few salvage parts.
                    Take a automotive a/c condenser coil,plumb it into the line running between the compressor head and the check valve with a standard water trap just ahead of the check valve along with a pipe tee,mount a blower and shroud to the coil.By dropping the air temp below the dew point the water will condense out in the coil and be cuaght in the water trap.I had one on my old sears pump that worked great,perfectly cool dry air with no oil.I am going to build one for my new pump as soon as I find a sutable coil,pictures to come.
                    I just need one more tool,just one!

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thanks for all the replies.

                      I really like the idea of using a condensor before the air tank. I have one off of an 86 T-bird sitting against the air compressor. Never thought about using it there, thought it was just a handy storage place.

                      I think the milk jug maybe the answer for now while I consider drill through the brick or not. In the summer I get a cup of water, fall and spring as much as 2 cups.

                      The drain is a small ball, it was all I could find in that size at the time.



                      [This message has been edited by JPR (edited 08-17-2004).]
                      John

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                      • #12
                        Unless your shop is air conditioned, it depends on how humid it is that day. The higher the humidity the more water will condense in your tank.
                        I have a fliter/coalessor at the beguinnig of the run and if I'm spraying paint I have one at the spray gun as well.
                        The coalessor gets drained with the tank.

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