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Making Split Plain Bearings Sleeves?

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  • Making Split Plain Bearings Sleeves?

    I'm curious as to how the split bearing sleeve are made. It seems like they must be forced through some sort of die I've never seen how they're made.

    I know they make them from all kinds of materials.I've seen them brass, bronze, aluminum, & plastic or steel back with PTFE liner some graphite plug usually real thin.

    I ask because I occasionally have a need for a cheap bushing for a wear surface and I figured that I could probably use a small piece of copper tubing or aluminum flattened out pushed through die for some non-critical applications. I just never seen it done so I'm not exactly sure how to go about setting up a jig. to do it.
    Last edited by Jmay; 11-06-2017, 09:23 AM.

  • #2
    Are you talking about DU bushings?

    -D
    DZER

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    • #3
      Are you looking at something thick enough to actually machine it or you want to form shells similar to the thin sleeve bearings in a typical car engine? I'm sort of guessing from your desire to use some copper tubing that you are after a thin sleeve. The issue there becomes one of making the sleeve just very slightly oversize and accurately round so when it's squeezed into the saddles that hold them in place that they fit the journal. So I'm not sure where a die comes into this other than for those that are stamped out on suitable dies in mass production.
      Chilliwack BC, Canada

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Doozer View Post
        Are you talking about DU bushings?

        -D
        Yep that's kinds the idea.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by BCRider View Post
          Are you looking at something thick enough to actually machine it or you want to form shells similar to the thin sleeve bearings in a typical car engine? I'm sort of guessing from your desire to use some copper tubing that you are after a thin sleeve. The issue there becomes one of making the sleeve just very slightly oversize and accurately round so when it's squeezed into the saddles that hold them in place that they fit the journal. So I'm not sure where a die comes into this other than for those that are stamped out on suitable dies in mass production.
          Yes I mean thin DU split type bushing. No I am not looking for any dies, just curious how they are formed or mass-produced that way I can get an idea how to do it myself maybe.

          My thought is to rollers with a 3rd roller on lever The same diameter of the shaft for the application. Then take the flat piece that will be the bushing material figure your PI calculation trim it down. Then adjust the outer 2 rollers to OD of the shaft + thickness of bushing material x 2 and force the center roller with the bushing material on it. Turn and repeat a few times.

          In my head this sounds good. We shall see. I understand this is not for high speed, critical, or any other serious application.

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          • #6
            In my career in a naval shipyard we worked dozens of hoist, boat, and deck winches on every ship. Many were furnished with split bronze bearings making ready bearing replacement possible without completely dismantling the drums, bull gears, gypsys, collars, seal retainers, etc from their shafts.

            Bronze stock was prepared by roughing out the bushing over-size and under-size to allow for the slitting saw and over-length to allow for the offset. The prepared stock was split on the centerline, the joint fitted and soft soldered metal to metal with a 3/16 axial offset to access the split for subsequent set-up. Then the bushing was turned and bored in reference to the centerline split (reference provided by the axial shift) and faced to length. Then grease grooves, holes ect were machined. After finishing, the bushing was heated to release the solder and the joint hot-wiped the remove the residue.

            Split babbitt bearing shells are made in much the same way but the babbitt lining is cast in a separate operation.

            There are other ways including rolling up halves of the correct thickness and fixturing them for machining the joints, etc, and mass production methods used by ICE industry bearing suppliers.
            Last edited by Forrest Addy; 11-06-2017, 05:03 PM.

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