Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Starting small.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Starting small.

    So I am just starting out as a hobbiest. Just got a SB 9 model C. I am already falling in love with this hobby. I am looking at Vertical End Mills and I am kinda growing partial to the PM-25 over say the Grizzly. My question is with such a small machine could I do some production stuff with it? I want to convert it to CNC. I just want to start small and build from there. I am already trying to learn Fusion 360. My current job pays me just above what a machinist would make so getting a job in a shop doesn't make sense right now but I am thinking if I could use this as a pebble to knock off the edge and let it gain momentum it could work?

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_eYE9fFXDdM&t=235s
    "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you."

  • #2
    Go with the Grizzly.
    At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

    Location: SF East Bay.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by danlb View Post
      Go with the Grizzly.
      Why? I'm in sort of the same boat (deciding on a small mill - I simply don't have the shop space for a Bridgeport size machine). My research shows owners are happier with the PM; it doesn't seem to need the same level of "upgrades for usefulness" as the Grizzly does.
      Kevin

      More tools than sense.

      Comment


      • #4
        Size is not a factor for CNC, you can have it in any size. I am or at least had thought about doing it with my Unimat which is about a 2" x 6" lathe and has a similar envelope for milling. But I ain't gonna be making any propellers for battleships on it.

        What you need to think about, is what are you going to be making and how big is it. Or if this is for profit, then what can you sell?
        Paul A.
        SE Texas

        And if you look REAL close at an analog signal,
        You will find that it has discrete steps.

        Comment


        • #5
          Click the link I posted. Its a great side by side of the PM vs the Griz. The guys does a great job of selling PM.
          "If at first you don't succeed, skydiving is not for you."

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by PlanlosChannel View Post
            Click the link I posted. Its a great side by side of the PM vs the Griz. The guys does a great job of selling PM.
            I didn't care for that video. It might be a better machine but the video is quite tiresome. Poor salesmanship if you ask me.

            Comment


            • #7
              If you want feedback on the PM machines, the forum at http://www.hobby-machinist.com/forum...-matthews.172/ is quite active.

              Dan
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

              Location: SF East Bay.

              Comment


              • #8
                Chuckle .. sorry ... your enthusiasm is contagious. Your in the right place.
                John Titor, when are you.

                Comment


                • #9
                  My thoughts are this... Small machines will always leave you wanting bigger. If you love 3D printing and/or 3D cad, just get a CNC mill, it’s where you will eventually end up. Manual machines are for old farts, cash strapped, and non computer people. I would trade in my Bridgeport in a split second for a CNC mill that had a smaller work envelope. As long as it was a quality machine.

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                    My thoughts are this... Small machines will always leave you wanting bigger. If you love 3D printing and/or 3D cad, just get a CNC mill, it’s where you will eventually end up. Manual machines are for old farts, cash strapped, and non computer people. I would trade in my Bridgeport in a split second for a CNC mill that had a smaller work envelope. As long as it was a quality machine.
                    Quality is in the eye of the beholder. The Taig 2019 CR is a the CNC mill I started with. It "can" hold under .001 if adjusted or it "can" go pretty fast if loosened up. I made tens of thousands of dollars worth of parts with mine, and the base machine is only about $1700. Of course by the time you get flushed out and ready to run you could be in for a couple grand more depending on what you have and what you know. Maybe only a few hundred more if you just plunk it down on a table and connect it to a computer you already own. Its got lots of issues, but for the price its pretty darn good. It costs less than I see old Bridgeports selling for in this part of the country. Mine is all apart, so you would not be interested, but I wouldn't sell mine for the world. That machine not only made tens of thousands of dollars worth of parts for me, but it gave me a huge education. It will get rebuilt, upgraded a little bit, and placed in my office as a display and play machine. I'd sell one of my bigger machines before I would sell that one. Of course that's mostly sentimental.

                    Anyway, for the "average" cost of a decent used Bridgeport you could have a small CNC mill up and running. I'm sure its not what you were thinking of, but it will make good parts... as long as they aren't very big... and you aren't in a hurry. LOL. If you are willing to learn and don't already know it all it will give you a huge education.
                    *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I feel like I am am in a good position to post a comment here since I have a Grizzly lathe (China) and PM vertical mill (supposedly made in Taiwan). Both machines leave a lot to be desired, they both have design issues and big quality problems. Grizzly has a very good manual, decent customer service and parts availability. PM being a small company cannot match that. If you live close to one of Grizzly showrooms, you can see the machines in person and play with them a little. I could not do that with PM although I live close enough - they did not have the machines to show to the potential customers.

                      I took both of my machines almost completely apart. A lot of problems were discovered and fixed in the process. My machines are significantly bigger and more expensive than the 2 mills in the attached video. So I would expect issues on any small Chinese machine regardless of the name on the nameplate. And being this small both Grizzly and PM mills in the video would be very limited in their capabilities. I would not go with either one of these machines. But if you want to play with CNC, you can do it with any one of them. Just remember one thing - such machines are not intended for production and cost of tooling and accessories will easily exceed the machine cost.

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Starting small.

                        As a hobbyist, a CNC Taig mill would be more useful to me than my manual Bridgeport for my R/C airplane hobby. However, the Bridgeport was bought for machining big parts for my live steam hobby which has stayed dormant. So for right now, a CNC Taig would be sweet for Aluminum.
                        What would be even better, and work for all my needs is a Tormach 1100. The Bridgeport is not a good candidate for CNC, it needs to be scraped and new gibs.


                        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

                        Comment

                        Working...
                        X