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  • True roller timing chain

    In the hot rod world we have such things as BILLET aluminum gas pedals.and TRUE RoLLER timing timing chains. Does anyone know how a TRUE ROLLER chain differs from a regular roller chain? Edwin Dirnbeck

  • #2
    Usually the rollerson a chain are made from rolled flat stock. I wold think that true roller are machined rollers.
    Helder Ferreira
    Setubal, Portugal

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    • #3
      I may be wrong but I believe the difference lies in that some chains have press fit "rollers" fitted to the pins while a true roller is free to float on it's pin. Think cheap bicycle chain vs. a motorcycle's drive chain.

      Or maybe the rollers are hand carved from billet.
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Willy View Post
        Or maybe the rollers are hand carved from billet.
        No, no, no.......They're hand forged from billet!

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        • #5
          http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html

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          • #6
            So looking at the link left by H380 I see by the little circled R that "true is a registered trademark of Cloyes Performance Products.

            https://www.trademarkia.com/true-73275222.html

            On Friday, August 22, 1980, a U.S. federal trademark registration was filed for TRUE by Cloyes Gear & Products, Inc., Fort Smith, AZ 72903. The USPTO has given the TRUE trademark serial number of 73275222. The current federal status of this trademark filing is REGISTERED AND RENEWED.
            So now we know what a True® roller chain is, how dull, was hoping for more technical aspects in regards to roller chains. Sigh, LOL.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #7
              Cheap roller chain has the rollers made from rolled plate without the ends even being welded. The good ones like DID and Reynolds have rollers made from seamless tube, hardened and ground.

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              • #8
                But there's only one cam sprocket/gear. How does that work???
                Location- Rugby, Warwickshire. UK

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                • #9
                  Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

                  By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                    Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

                    By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.
                    RIGHT!

                    Search images of HyVo chain. That is timing chain and it is VERY WELL DESIGNED for the application. Many application really. Just keep it lubricated.

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                    • #11
                      nylon overlay sprockets were to blame

                      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                      Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

                      By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.
                      Standard silent type non roller timing chains worked well for a long time. In the 1960s Gm started making the large sprocket out of diecast metal with a nylon overlay. Like clockwork ,they came apart at 62395 miles.Someone figured out how to retrofit a roller chain and sprockets and then around 1971 cloyles dcsided to FINALY make a decent chain that has rollers made from welded tube or solid stock instead of the wraped rollers made from strip stock.This info is the best that I could come up with ,maybe others could ad to this.Their chain should really be called improved roller chain ,but truth doesn't make as much money as lies. Edwin Dirnbeck
                      Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 11-07-2017, 04:55 PM.

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                      • #12
                        You silly. Of course it has small needle bearing inside each roller.
                        Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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                        • #13
                          Roller chain has rollers that spin.
                          Bushing chain has rollers that do not spin.
                          Many times, #35 chain is called roller chain.
                          It is a misnomer, as the rollers do not spin.
                          Now, #40 chain has rollers that do spin.
                          This is real roller chain. The ones that call
                          #35 chain as roller chain, are ignorant or
                          outright lying.
                          Maybe it is more of a roundabout path than that.
                          There are swivel casters and rigid casters. Well
                          rigid casters actually have no caster offset, so
                          why the name? And if you want to get technical,
                          caster might be a misnomer as well. Don't casters
                          really have "trail" that makes the drag in the direction
                          that you want to go???


                          -Doozer
                          DZER

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                          • #14
                            Now that I think about it, A "roller"chain BY ITSELF doesn't have any rolling elements. It has pins that pivot back and forth and a tube "roller" that rotates.The ROLLING takes place at the contact between the outside of the tubes and the sprocket. Edwin Dirnbeck

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                            • #15
                              Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

                              How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

                              To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

                              http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html

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