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  • #16
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Roller chain has rollers that spin.
    Bushing chain has rollers that do not spin.
    Many times, #35 chain is called roller chain.
    It is a misnomer, as the rollers do not spin.
    Now, #40 chain has rollers that do spin.
    This is real roller chain. The ones that call
    #35 chain as roller chain, are ignorant or
    outright lying.
    Maybe it is more of a roundabout path than that.
    There are swivel casters and rigid casters. Well
    rigid casters actually have no caster offset, so
    why the name? And if you want to get technical,
    caster might be a misnomer as well. Don't casters
    really have "trail" that makes the drag in the direction
    that you want to go???


    -Doozer
    Its a cold day and to much time on my hands. Earlier I went to the cheap store and their cheap bicylcles had rotating rollers on their chains. I just checked my no 35 chain in my junk box and it has FIXED ROLLERS LIKE YOU SAID . Never to late to learn

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    • #17
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
      You silly. Of course it has small needle bearing inside each roller.
      Shh, don't give these new engineers any ideas.Edwin Dirnbeck

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      • #18
        Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
        Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

        How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

        To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

        http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html
        The adjustabilty isn't in regards to chain tension. It's for adjusting cam timing a few degrees either way of dot to dot.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
          Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

          How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

          To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

          http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html


          The intended use is for adjusting the cam timing. You can advance or retard the cam events in relationship to the crank. Hence the multiple keyways on the crank sprocket. This was an advantage years ago before custom cams were availble. It allowed you to "tune" an off the shelf cam to your particular engine combo.


          -Bob

          I see paul posted while I was typing.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by CalM View Post
            RIGHT!

            Search images of HyVo chain. That is timing chain and it is VERY WELL DESIGNED for the application. Many application really. Just keep it lubricated.
            HyVo chain got me to wondering a few years ago. If you had the engine apart for some reason could check the chain by pressing the center together, if it touched it was time to replace (Always replaced any time I had it that far down anyway) now they come in little boxes all rolled up.

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            • #21
              I'd hate to buy a timing chain for a Wartsila diesel

              http://www.yachtforums.com/attachmen...ain-jpg.30381/
              I just need one more tool,just one!

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              • #22
                IT was bad enough changing the drive chains on my case skid steer, (you don't want to drop the link in the oil bath, magnet fishing I found 5 of them, a quote tidy bhaco 8" adjustable, a leather man do dah, more screw top bottle tops than I thought you could hide there, amazing (machine was at a recycling plant)
                I've seen the big chains for a ship on the back of a lorry, like 4 giant plates with rollers, they probably sell them by the link, we had ore carrier ships in the deep water harbour in work, I was lucky enough to get to see the engine room, or hanger is more accurate, huge the fitters were doing repairs, they even had surveyors down there aligning the prop shaft, they were running about like lunatics because the ship was holding up other ships, apparently they have to pay the bill, it was called demurage I think, about 100k a day!
                Mark

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