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  • boslab
    replied
    IT was bad enough changing the drive chains on my case skid steer, (you don't want to drop the link in the oil bath, magnet fishing I found 5 of them, a quote tidy bhaco 8" adjustable, a leather man do dah, more screw top bottle tops than I thought you could hide there, amazing (machine was at a recycling plant)
    I've seen the big chains for a ship on the back of a lorry, like 4 giant plates with rollers, they probably sell them by the link, we had ore carrier ships in the deep water harbour in work, I was lucky enough to get to see the engine room, or hanger is more accurate, huge the fitters were doing repairs, they even had surveyors down there aligning the prop shaft, they were running about like lunatics because the ship was holding up other ships, apparently they have to pay the bill, it was called demurage I think, about 100k a day!
    Mark

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  • wierdscience
    replied
    I'd hate to buy a timing chain for a Wartsila diesel

    http://www.yachtforums.com/attachmen...ain-jpg.30381/

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  • kendall
    replied
    Originally posted by CalM View Post
    RIGHT!

    Search images of HyVo chain. That is timing chain and it is VERY WELL DESIGNED for the application. Many application really. Just keep it lubricated.
    HyVo chain got me to wondering a few years ago. If you had the engine apart for some reason could check the chain by pressing the center together, if it touched it was time to replace (Always replaced any time I had it that far down anyway) now they come in little boxes all rolled up.

    Leave a comment:


  • 90LX_Notch
    replied
    Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
    Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

    How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

    To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

    http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html


    The intended use is for adjusting the cam timing. You can advance or retard the cam events in relationship to the crank. Hence the multiple keyways on the crank sprocket. This was an advantage years ago before custom cams were availble. It allowed you to "tune" an off the shelf cam to your particular engine combo.


    -Bob

    I see paul posted while I was typing.

    Leave a comment:


  • paul463
    replied
    Originally posted by Norman Bain View Post
    Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

    How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

    To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

    http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html
    The adjustabilty isn't in regards to chain tension. It's for adjusting cam timing a few degrees either way of dot to dot.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edwin Dirnbeck
    replied
    Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
    You silly. Of course it has small needle bearing inside each roller.
    Shh, don't give these new engineers any ideas.Edwin Dirnbeck

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  • Edwin Dirnbeck
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Roller chain has rollers that spin.
    Bushing chain has rollers that do not spin.
    Many times, #35 chain is called roller chain.
    It is a misnomer, as the rollers do not spin.
    Now, #40 chain has rollers that do spin.
    This is real roller chain. The ones that call
    #35 chain as roller chain, are ignorant or
    outright lying.
    Maybe it is more of a roundabout path than that.
    There are swivel casters and rigid casters. Well
    rigid casters actually have no caster offset, so
    why the name? And if you want to get technical,
    caster might be a misnomer as well. Don't casters
    really have "trail" that makes the drag in the direction
    that you want to go???


    -Doozer
    Its a cold day and to much time on my hands. Earlier I went to the cheap store and their cheap bicylcles had rotating rollers on their chains. I just checked my no 35 chain in my junk box and it has FIXED ROLLERS LIKE YOU SAID . Never to late to learn

    Leave a comment:


  • Norman Bain
    replied
    Just a tad off topic; but the Cloyes site seems to be saying that they have a mechanism for changing what are fixed sprocket spacings to adjust for chain slack.

    How do they do that given the tooth count cannot be altered?

    To me it seems a change in the chain roller diameter together with a change in sprocket to match would be required.

    http://www.cloyes.com/highperf.html

    Leave a comment:


  • Edwin Dirnbeck
    replied
    Now that I think about it, A "roller"chain BY ITSELF doesn't have any rolling elements. It has pins that pivot back and forth and a tube "roller" that rotates.The ROLLING takes place at the contact between the outside of the tubes and the sprocket. Edwin Dirnbeck

    Leave a comment:


  • Doozer
    replied
    Roller chain has rollers that spin.
    Bushing chain has rollers that do not spin.
    Many times, #35 chain is called roller chain.
    It is a misnomer, as the rollers do not spin.
    Now, #40 chain has rollers that do spin.
    This is real roller chain. The ones that call
    #35 chain as roller chain, are ignorant or
    outright lying.
    Maybe it is more of a roundabout path than that.
    There are swivel casters and rigid casters. Well
    rigid casters actually have no caster offset, so
    why the name? And if you want to get technical,
    caster might be a misnomer as well. Don't casters
    really have "trail" that makes the drag in the direction
    that you want to go???


    -Doozer

    Leave a comment:


  • MattiJ
    replied
    You silly. Of course it has small needle bearing inside each roller.

    Leave a comment:


  • Edwin Dirnbeck
    replied
    nylon overlay sprockets were to blame

    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

    By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.
    Standard silent type non roller timing chains worked well for a long time. In the 1960s Gm started making the large sprocket out of diecast metal with a nylon overlay. Like clockwork ,they came apart at 62395 miles.Someone figured out how to retrofit a roller chain and sprockets and then around 1971 cloyles dcsided to FINALY make a decent chain that has rollers made from welded tube or solid stock instead of the wraped rollers made from strip stock.This info is the best that I could come up with ,maybe others could ad to this.Their chain should really be called improved roller chain ,but truth doesn't make as much money as lies. Edwin Dirnbeck
    Last edited by Edwin Dirnbeck; 11-07-2017, 03:55 PM.

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  • CalM
    replied
    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
    Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

    By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.
    RIGHT!

    Search images of HyVo chain. That is timing chain and it is VERY WELL DESIGNED for the application. Many application really. Just keep it lubricated.

    Leave a comment:


  • CCWKen
    replied
    Eh... Totally low-grade. It gotta be "reinforced space age polymer" or it's just high priced bicycle chain.

    By the way, standard timing chains don't have any rollers. They just pivot at the links.

    Leave a comment:


  • Mark Rand
    replied
    But there's only one cam sprocket/gear. How does that work???

    Leave a comment:

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