Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

OT: Double slit experiment

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • #31
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

    I haven't told anyone on this forum that they're wrong.
    Really? I get the strong sense the only time we every see you is when you are correcting someone, i.e. telling them they're wrong. Not saying you're wrong in this case, but its curious existence so I was wondering if you do machining and if you'd post and share some of your projects? Love to see what you are up to.

    Last edited by Mcgyver; 07-04-2020, 08:01 PM.
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

    Comment


    • #32
      Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
      Really? I get the strong sense the only time we every see you is when you are correcting someone, i.e. telling them they're wrong.
      You can go through my posting history and check the accuracy of your claim.

      Not saying you're wrong in this case, but its curious existence so I was wondering if you do machining and if you'd post and share some of your projects? Love to see what you are up to.
      I have a full CNC shop, but it's not for "projects", it's for products. Photos of the parts would be of limited interest to other forum members.

      Comment


      • #33
        So, a topic comes up that is interesting to many of us, but few of us have any real expertise in it. Someone pipes up who has real knowledge in the area, and we question why he is even here? What's up with that?

        Ed
        Last edited by ed_h; 07-04-2020, 10:28 PM.
        For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

        Comment


        • #34
          I think the evolution of physics (as well as biology), particularly in the last 100 or so years, illustrates how our conception of reality, time, space, and life itself is limited by our human senses and capacity for understanding abstract concepts. Philosophy is the study of human knowledge and wisdom, and how we come to know, or think we know, what truth and reality are. There is only so much any of us can know by direct observation and interaction with the universe, and beyond that, we must rely on what others have observed, tested, and verified with postulates and theories, and their testimonies of confirmation. Philosophy teaches us to be careful of accepting "known" truths, and always allowing for some distortion and incomplete understanding.

          The concept of the photon is troubling because of its duality as a particle and as a wave, depending on what physical experiments are conducted. Perhaps the latest quantum mechanical explanations can resolve this difficulty, but for most practical purposes, it may be just as well to use whichever model suits the need. It is also true that any observation will change what is being observed, and our basis for conceptualization of a model is based on its interaction with externally imposed stimuli, and observation of resultant emission of particles/waves that can be (probably imperfectly) observed and quantified.

          Philosophy may help us better understand our human limitations, and provide insight into how we may best proceed with technological advancement, as well as our relationships with other elements of our environment, including humans, animals, plants, and things we consider non-living.
          http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
          Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
          USA Maryland 21030

          Comment


          • #35
            Originally posted by ed_h View Post
            Someone pipes up who has real knowledge in the area, and we question why he is even here? What's up with that?

            Ed
            sorry for going OT, but it was a OT thread 3 years old . I was legitimately curious.
            in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

            Comment


            • #36
              I have a question for tomato coupe, that involves his area of expertise. How do those portable handheld x- ray generators work? They appear to generate only forwards, and do not use a lot of electricity, being powered by a Dewalt hand tool battery. I've been told they involve carbon nanotubes.

              Comment


              • #37
                Originally posted by Corbettprime View Post
                I have a question for tomato coupe, that involves his area of expertise. How do those portable handheld x- ray generators work? They appear to generate only forwards, and do not use a lot of electricity, being powered by a Dewalt hand tool battery. I've been told they involve carbon nanotubes.
                Sorry, I don't know anything about DeWalt batteries.

                Comment


                • #38
                  Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

                  Sorry, I don't know anything about DeWalt batteries.
                  Well played!
                  At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

                  Location: SF East Bay.

                  Comment


                  • #39
                    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post

                    Sorry, I don't know anything about DeWalt batteries.
                    Sorry, I never asked about Dewalt batteries. If you are unfamiliar with x-ray generators, just say so.
                    Last edited by Corbettprime; 07-05-2020, 05:35 PM. Reason: Corrected autocorrect

                    Comment


                    • #40
                      Here's info on nanotubes for x-rays.

                      https://www.thefreelibrary.com/Carbo...o).-a089581030

                      https://nanoconvergencejournal.sprin...580-014-0034-2

                      Dogpile is your friend.
                      http://pauleschoen.com/pix/PM08_P76_P54.png
                      Paul , P S Technology, Inc. and MrTibbs
                      USA Maryland 21030

                      Comment


                      • #41
                        They can just use small x-ray tubes, they have been around for a while. The tubes are directional and you can use optics to collimate the beam. X-rays are actually very easy to make. You can unroll a roll of scotch tape in a vacuum and get x-rays. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LQBjRF9mX1Y

                        Another option is use a gamma source, gamma and x-rays are the same thing, just how they are produced. I have a density detector that they use to look for contraband in vehicles, it uses Barium 133 to generate gammas which are bounced back to a scintillator. There are XRF units that use other isotopes to do the same thing.

                        There are also devices like this that use a cold cathode x-ray tube and provide short pulses (50ns) of x-rays https://www.ebay.com/itm/Golden-Engi...53.m2749.l2649

                        Comment


                        • #42
                          Thanks for the dogpile link. Until I retired last May, one of my clients used the battery powered x-ray generators in building bomb detection units. I was impressed with the sharpness of the images, must have been a true point source, that all of the radiation went forward in a 20 or 30 degree cone, and that they were willing to x-ray some metal parts for me. There were some real revelations there. Sidenote, years ago, when I bought that little department store back in Kansas, it came with a Dr. Sholl foot x-ray machine. That got yanked out of service really fast. And believe it or not, there were unhappy parents.

                          Comment


                          • #43
                            Its probably one of these, you can see the cold cathode tube about 3/4 the way thought manual: http://www.goldenengineering.com/wp-...out_032318.pdf

                            Comment

                            Working...
                            X