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O/T: Thinning epoxy for use.

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  • O/T: Thinning epoxy for use.

    I have read many ideas on the internet re: thinning un-mixed epoxy for use and there are just too many options. So, I thought I would pick some brains here.

    I will be using a general hardware store variety (devcon) 2 ton epoxy. I am repairing a butcher block that has a deep crack.

    My plan is to tape the crack with wide clear tape and inject the thinned epoxy into a very small drilled hole. I have syringes for the injection.

    I dont want to make the epoxy super thin, just a lil more fluid so it will go through the the syringe needle.

    So. The ideas on the internet ranged in variety. Warming, MEK, alcohol, acetone and so on.

    Anyone here try any method that worked for them??

    Thanks in advance. JR


  • #2
    If that were mine, I would lightly sand it and collect the dust, Use waterproof wood glue and use the dust to fill the crack. I would not want to have any nasty chemicals around food. Just my opinion, hope it helps.
    https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCIF...7S66kX1s8rd0qA

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    • #3
      Warming epoxy will thin it slightly but also accelerates the curing time.. if you look at the datasheets for products aimed at the professional / industrial users you will often find cure time Vs temperature charts.

      Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Steve_Cole View Post
        Warming epoxy will thin it slightly but also accelerates the curing time.. if you look at the datasheets for products aimed at the professional / industrial users you will often find cure time Vs temperature charts.

        Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk
        Yes, what Steve said ! I have heated epoxy many times to make it more fluid. It does cure much faster so don't use the 5 minute or even 15 minute variety if you go that route. 45 min will be fine. It flows quite well when heated.

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        • #5
          That's a shame. Did the wood check due to lack of humidity?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
            That's a shame. Did the wood check due to lack of humidity?
            No, she was dropped on her head as a baby JR

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            • #7
              Install a dovetail key.
              Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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              • #8
                I would use a light colored epoxy based wood filler or as Joe suggested mix in some saw dust from the same material with standard white wood glue and work it in there really good then after it's fully cured, re-sand it over the crack - keep repeating as necessary.

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                • #9
                  Epoxy IS liquid when you buy the real stuff.
                  The "general store variety" as you call it contains thickener, that's your problem.
                  If you have a shop for RC models near you, they'll have basic epoxy, which is usually mixed 100:40.

                  That being said, I wouldn't use epoxy for this repair, it'll look lousy as it soaks into the wood and creeps under the tape.

                  If you do go ahead, do the following instead: lay the block on the side, so the edge with the crack is upwards. Close both sides of the crack with rubber sheet and two wood blocks and secure with C-clamps.
                  Then you can pour in the epoxy without problems.

                  Heating the whole thing (>100 C / >200 F) helps, and makes the epoxy even more viscous (and much stronger). 20 minutes with a hair dryer is good.
                  Last edited by Benta; 11-14-2017, 03:54 PM.

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                  • #10
                    There are liquid epoxy resins on the market, you want one that is slow curing.

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                    • #11
                      An alternative approach would be cascamite powdered resin glue.

                      Sent from my Nexus 6 using Tapatalk

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                      • #12
                        Have used a small amount of acetone to thin West System epoxy many time with no problem.

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                        • #13
                          I would use cyanoacrylate and a pair of bar clamps. Yes, common super glue. I've fixed many a cutting board with the stuff; it was tailor made for just such a repair.

                          Your wood looks to be closed grain hardwood (looks like hard maple). You can flow the cyanoacrylate clear through the crack and then close it up with the bar clamps (one on each side). It does not penetrate too far and will clean up on the surface with a very light sanding.

                          I'll bet it'd almost be unnoticeable. And once dry it won't react with food- though from your photo, your board probably doesn't see a hard time anyway!

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                          • #14
                            That crack, which is due to shrinkage and not warping, will probably not close up with clamps and if tried will likely induce cracks elsewhere. Fill it.
                            Southwest Utah

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                            • #15
                              Alcohol, either isopropyl or denatured will work for thinning and clean up of epoxy. Be advised, when you thin epoxy with alcohol or acetone it will slow the curing time and it becomes more rubbery when cured. You may want to do a test first.
                              Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
                              Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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