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  • tin

    Besides finding it next to your food inside of a can in your pantry, what do any of you do with tin? Does anybody have an actual use for tin?

    I think it's been phased out as can liner, in favor of a thin layer of epoxy. But there must be a home shop use for the metal-
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Solder with it?

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    • #3
      I put tin in lead when I cast bullets.

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      • #4
        I kind of passed over that use for it- I use solder almost every day. I was thinking more like uses in the sheet form, but as an alloying element that's definitely a use.

        One use in sheet form is for helmets for freaks- do they still make tin hats?
        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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        • #5
          "Tin" roofing. Prolly zinc these days. But it is Tin roofing. JR

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          • #6
            Originally posted by darryl View Post
            I kind of passed over that use for it- I use solder almost every day. I was thinking more like uses in the sheet form, but as an alloying element that's definitely a use.

            One use in sheet form is for helmets for freaks- do they still make tin hats?
            Even tin hats are made of aluminium foil. Everything is ruined nowadays...
            Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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            • #7
              All your bronze bushes in your machinery will have it alloyed with copper

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              • #8
                Clockmakers seem to like using it for polishing laps, supposedly it works pretty well to let the polishing compound charge the surface but its still hard enough to not deform and round the edges of whatever's being polished.

                Personally I'd rather tin instead of lead if I ever needed to cast a low-temperature metal. Hasn't happened yet, but it might

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                • #9
                  I have used tin foil (actual foil, made from the element tin, not aluminum foil) for protecting a wooden surface I wanted to take an impression of. The material is more ductile than aluminum, so you can stretch it into some curves without wrinkles. It is also really expensive. I got the idea from Frank Ford's website.

                  allan
                  Last edited by kitno455; 11-16-2017, 07:34 AM.

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                  • #10
                    In the gemstone industry many polishing laps are made from tin for the reason "epicfail48" cited. It used to be tin/lead, but lead has fallen out of favor for some reason.
                    VitŮŽria, Brazil

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                    • #11
                      I've been meaning to get my hands on a small block of real tin for a while now, for lapping, exactly as stated above. Zinc, iron, and "bell metal" (a particular type of bronze) are also used, depending on the abrasive and what the work is made of. There don't seem to be any cost effective sources of tin or zinc scrap, I ended up buying a chunk of zinc from a seller on e-bay, and it looks like that's probably the way to go for tin as well. Anyone have a better source for the stuff?
                      Max
                      http://joyofprecision.com/

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                      • #12
                        One possible source is rotometals.com - they carry bullet-making supplies, and may also have tin. No idea if their prices are reasonable.

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                        • #13
                          Isn't it used for float glass?. Used to be used for mirrors. I expect it is available in bulk in ingot form for making the alloys initially so the bigger professional foundry suppliers would have a source.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by mars-red View Post
                            I've been meaning to get my hands on a small block of real tin for a while now, for lapping, exactly as stated above. Zinc, iron, and "bell metal" (a particular type of bronze) are also used, depending on the abrasive and what the work is made of. There don't seem to be any cost effective sources of tin or zinc scrap, I ended up buying a chunk of zinc from a seller on e-bay, and it looks like that's probably the way to go for tin as well. Anyone have a better source for the stuff?
                            Zinc anodes maybe? They are used on boats.
                            Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                            • #15
                              You can get a solution to deposit a layer of tin onto copper. Protects the copper from oxidation and makes it easier to solder.

                              Ed
                              For just a little more, you can do it yourself!

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