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  • 1-800miner
    replied
    Originally posted by Jmay View Post
    Hmm, I thought Babbitt and moisture didn't play well together. Is a plaster of Paris mold dangerous with Babbitt due to moisture, or is that asking for trouble.
    Babbitt is a low temp melt. Bread dough works fine.
    To check the right temperature for pouring, use a dry pine stick, stir the melt for a few seconds and the stick should slightly char. If it burst into flames you are way too hot for pouring.
    Be sure to preheat the parts or you will be doing it the second time.

    We did big ball mills and crushers and would heat the iron up until it was uncomfortable to the touch.
    Loved doing it in the winter. Set up a tent over the machine to keep it and us warm and toasty while the rest of the crew were freezing in the wind and snow.
    Last edited by 1-800miner; 11-18-2017, 08:49 AM.

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  • Dan_the_Chemist
    replied
    Search for babbitt on YouTube and you'll find a bunch of videos about pouring and/or machining babbitt bearings (and about the book and other stuff, too).

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  • kf2qd
    replied
    Or you could use a brass tube instead of steel and tin the brass before pouring the babbit.

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  • Mister ED
    replied
    Jmay -
    Welcome to the world of babbitt.

    To use your steel shell idea:
    • Drill a couple 3/8" holes in the shell.
    • Wrap the shell with some sheet metal, extending higher than the shell (as someone already mentioned).
    • Make sure the sheet metal has some release agent on it.
    • Around the base, just put a bead of high temp RTV to seal it up.
    • Use a core of your choice, coat with release agent, pull when still plenty hot.

    Finish as described above, face off the extra and bore to size. The two holes you drilled in the shell will fill with babbitt and prevent the babbitt material from turning in the shell. This is pretty common on replaceable babbitt inserts (Aermotor 702 snout bearing is like this). Heat the babbitt until a piece of pine blackens when stirring the babbitt. I use acetylene smoke for release. You could also use a single layer (or two) of a paper grocery sack taped to the core ... probably a good way to go for that application.

    If you recall that post I made last year, I used pipe for a form and had a steel core. Both were removed. I had to use a bit of persuasion getting the core out. But that was good as I used the core as a mandrel for turning.

    You'll be pouring windmill bearings in no time. As mentioned, it machines like butter.

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  • cameron
    replied
    Originally posted by Joel View Post
    Most likely you are thinking of Charles Babbage and the 'Difference Engine' he designed.

    Whooooops!!!!

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  • Joel
    replied
    Originally posted by cameron View Post
    Was thinking of the Babbitt who invented a mechanical computer.
    Most likely you are thinking of Charles Babbage and the 'Difference Engine' he designed.

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  • cameron
    replied
    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
    Those college educated elitists who wrote spell check know that "Babbitt" is a novel by Sinclair Lewis, but don't know that "babbitt" is an alloy of lead or tin.
    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Babbitt_(alloy)
    Forgot about that Babbitt. Was thinking of the Babbitt who invented a mechanical computer. Or something like that!

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Just answered my own question how about plaster of Paris and Babbitt. I just read on Rotometals website they say that these alloys can be cast into plaster of Paris

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Originally posted by 1-800miner View Post
    Mix up some flour and salt into a dough. roll it into cylinder shapes and seal the gaps with it. As soon as the heat hits it, it crusts up. Smells like home made bread.
    Want an oil groove? Lay a couple of them in an x around the shaft before you pour. You can leave it in there. It is soft and will hold oil as well.
    Hmm, I thought Babbitt and moisture didn't play well together. Is a plaster of Paris mold dangerous with Babbitt due to moisture, or is that asking for trouble.

    Leave a comment:


  • Arcane
    replied
    You know, there are some great guys over on https://www.smokstak.com/ who are very knowledgeable about pouring babbitt bearings. If you haven't already been there, I'd highly recommend having a visit.

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Probably could do that, that takes the experimentation in the fun out of it at least for me anyways. I don't feel like doing much at way. LOL, but I might just learn that ain't no damn good at babbitting. Either way I'm going to give it a shot at least a couple times no sense in having babbitt laying around and never use it for nothing.

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  • Leadfootin
    replied
    Talk to an automotive machine shop and they can probably recommend someone who pours babbitt on a regular basis for antique engines. Lots of variations in formula etc. The experts will be able to easily pour a bearing with an excellent bond and no voids. All you will need is to finish the ID.

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  • 1-800miner
    replied
    Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
    The biggest issue I can see would be to have a tight seal so your babbitt doesn't run out. It's kind of like pouring led in a pipe joint. If it's not sealed it will run out.

    JL...............
    Mix up some flour and salt into a dough. roll it into cylinder shapes and seal the gaps with it. As soon as the heat hits it, it crusts up. Smells like home made bread.
    Want an oil groove? Lay a couple of them in an x around the shaft before you pour. You can leave it in there. It is soft and will hold oil as well.

    Leave a comment:


  • Toolguy
    replied
    Thanks for posting! I'll be interested to learn along with you.

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  • Jmay
    replied
    Originally posted by MrWhoopee View Post
    Leave the OD of your steel shell oversize and finish after the pour. Funny things happen. Maybe make your shell from a piece of bar stock, leaving it long enough to hold in the chuck with the center bore blind. The babbitt can't run out and you can turn ID and OD at the same time. Part it off after finishing.
    That is an interesting idea! My original idea was to use 1.25 inch schedule 40 for the outer ring then turn down the OD to fit the ID of what I need. Either way you fellas have brought up some interesting things for me to think about. I may make two different setups try them both in a trial run and see how they turn out sort of an experiment before deciding which one to make for installation.

    I'm not really pressed for time on this as this is a personal project, I fully understand that I can go buy bearing bronze stock or bronze bushing and probably accomplish this a lot easier and faster. I'm looking at this as more of a learning experience and a chance to play with Babbitt. Sometimes the information and experience you get from tinkering with little projects like this that you have time to play an experiment you learn some things for the future.

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