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OT STL Post-Dispatch reports "Techshop" has closed up

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  • metalfixer
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    Were their lathe and mill CNC or manual?
    The 2 lathes at Detroit Techshop were manual Jet lathes, one had a taper attachment
    and 5C collet closer. The 2 mills were also Jet, Bridgeport clones, with DROs.
    A Tormach 1100 CNC with 4th axis rotary attachment, heavy attachment with chuck, but the staff would help you install it.
    If an occasional job required over 4 hours, and you asked ahead of time, the staff would allow you more time when you reserved the machine. Sometimes 3D printers could run all night.
    The best method for milling was to use your own ‘Tooling Plate’ with your own clamping studs, if your setup was complicated or repetitive.
    The thing I didn’t like was having to tram or check the tram every time on the mills.
    Larry
    Last edited by metalfixer; 11-24-2017, 07:32 AM.

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  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    The ones that were in the San Mateo techshop back then were all manual. Most of their stuff was either donated, on loan or bought at auction. They were in usable condition.

    Last time I checked in they had some 3d printing, a 3d router and a small tormach... I think. It's been a while.

    Dan
    It sounds like it was pretty basic stuff; nothing new and/or exotic.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    Were their lathe and mill CNC or manual?
    The ones that were in the San Mateo techshop back then were all manual. Most of their stuff was either donated, on loan or bought at auction. They were in usable condition.

    Last time I checked in they had some 3d printing, a 3d router and a small tormach... I think. It's been a while.


    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Not really.

    It's a question of what did you mean by "is it comparable?". The original comment following the issue of high costs was that basic (typical home shop) machine shop lathe and mill can be (I did, anyhow) bought for a year's worth of the membership fees. You, in response, asked if that was for equivalent machines.

    The implication of the question in response was "if you did not buy precisely what they had, the comment about costs is stupid because you are only partly replacing the capability. And obviously for that $$ you did not buy what they had, so that is not a sensible thing to say.".

    But the comment is not quite that stupid, because most folks do not need, nor want, the full capability, at least judging by the population here, who seem to have an "average" of a 9 x 20, or 10" lathe, for instance. Sure , some here have a big Monarch etc, a bridgeport or larger mill, surface grinders, tool and cutter grinders, welding and cutting equipment, etc. But many seem to have a 10" or so lathe, and a mill-drill, with which they turn out very good work.

    I had already commented that if you really needed a 16" lathe and Bridgeport, no that membership money was not going to get you that capability (but it would get "typical" home shop equipment). So it seemed a little odd that you asked in that way, as that would seem to have been answered already.

    Maybe that was not as clear to you. And maybe you did not mean your question to be as "sharp" as it appeared.

    Now, lathe and mill are not the only things that were at Techshop... Plasma Cam, welding, and many other items were available for the same membership cost, and those are not all replaceable for the membership money. That is a point.
    Really sorry I asked.

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    Sorry I asked.
    Not really.

    It's a question of what did you mean by "is it comparable?". The original comment following the issue of high costs was that basic (typical home shop) machine shop lathe and mill can be (I did, anyhow) bought for a year's worth of the membership fees. You, in response, asked if that was for equivalent machines.

    The implication of the question in response was "if you did not buy precisely what they had, the comment about costs is stupid because you are only partly replacing the capability. And obviously for that $$ you did not buy what they had, so that is not a sensible thing to say.".

    But the comment is not quite that stupid, because most folks do not need, nor want, the full capability, at least judging by the population here, who seem to have an "average" of a 9 x 20, or 10" lathe, for instance. Sure , some here have a big Monarch etc, a bridgeport or larger mill, surface grinders, tool and cutter grinders, welding and cutting equipment, etc. But many seem to have a 10" or so lathe, and a mill-drill, with which they turn out very good work.

    I had already commented that if you really needed a 16" lathe and Bridgeport, no that membership money was not going to get you that capability (but it would get "typical" home shop equipment). So it seemed a little odd that you asked in that way, as that would seem to have been answered already.

    Maybe that was not as clear to you. And maybe you did not mean your question to be as "sharp" as it appeared.

    Now, lathe and mill are not the only things that were at Techshop... Plasma Cam, welding, and many other items were available for the same membership cost, and those are not all replaceable for the membership money. That is a point.
    Last edited by J Tiers; 11-22-2017, 12:06 PM.

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  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Obviously NOT a 16" or Bridgeport, yes? IOTTMCO

    10" Logan, Boley, Rivett, Lewis horizontal, with vertical head, Benchmaster with vertical and horizontal setups. It is not of any concern what I have, as one can often buy larger for less (being basement stairs friendly usually raises the cost). And, it is also not that important to have a 14" or 16" lathe if your parts are small enough to do on a 7 x 12.

    So the issue of being "comparable" is not necessarily a very significant consideration. Folks who DO have a shop, but have a need to use a larger machine that Techshop DID have, would benefit, of course. But since most folks starting out (and therefore are potential Techshop customers) seem to have small work envelope needs, buying small machines in the 10"and under category, with a similar sized mill-drill, I consider that my comment is quite relevant.

    It's not as if Techshop had a 36" Bullard, etc.
    Sorry I asked.

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    It was just a simple question. I have no idea what kind of lathe and mill you have.
    Obviously NOT a 16" or Bridgeport, yes? IOTTMCO

    10" Logan, Boley, Rivett, Lewis horizontal, with vertical head, Benchmaster with vertical and horizontal setups. It is not of any concern what I have, as one can often buy larger for less (being basement stairs friendly usually raises the cost). And, it is also not that important to have a 14" or 16" lathe if your parts are small enough to do on a 7 x 12.

    So the issue of being "comparable" is not necessarily a very significant consideration. Folks who DO have a shop, but have a need to use a larger machine that Techshop DID have, would benefit, of course. But since most folks starting out (and therefore are potential Techshop customers) seem to have small work envelope needs, buying small machines in the 10"and under category, with a similar sized mill-drill, I consider that my comment is quite relevant.

    It's not as if Techshop had a 36" Bullard, etc.

    Leave a comment:


  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by danlb View Post
    Funny that you should ask that. I signed up at the Techshop a year after getting my shop set up. I wanted to experience the difference between my consumer grade Asian imports and good old American iron. I kept hearing that the Asian machines were vastly inferior.

    To my delight, the machines at the Techshop did the same things in the same ways that my machines did at home. Their lathe could take deeper cuts than mine could, and it had a larger swing and longer bed, but other than that I could do the same work with either machine. I also found that I could hold the same accuracy on their 13 inch lathe as I did on my 7 inch lathe. Their Bridgeport clone had a few more features than my mill, but mine has a few features that theirs lacked, so it was sort of a draw.

    I got more out of attending the Techshop training classes than I did from using their hardware. I was able to take a 4 hour intro to MIG class and another one on TIG welding. I learned enough to get over my fear of burning down the house. I also learned enough about the welding machines that I could talk to the sellers intelligently when I went to buy one.

    I'm sorry they are gone. I always had in the back of my mind the possibility of using their services if I had to do something that exceeds the capabilities of my shop.

    Dan
    Were their lathe and mill CNC or manual?

    Leave a comment:


  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Read the whole post
    It was just a simple question. I have no idea what kind of lathe and mill you have.

    Leave a comment:


  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    Is this an apples to apples comparison, i.e. are your lathe and mill comparable to what these places provided?
    Funny that you should ask that. I signed up at the Techshop a year after getting my shop set up. I wanted to experience the difference between my consumer grade Asian imports and good old American iron. I kept hearing that the Asian machines were vastly inferior.

    To my delight, the machines at the Techshop did the same things in the same ways that my machines did at home. Their lathe could take deeper cuts than mine could, and it had a larger swing and longer bed, but other than that I could do the same work with either machine. I also found that I could hold the same accuracy on their 13 inch lathe as I did on my 7 inch lathe. Their Bridgeport clone had a few more features than my mill, but mine has a few features that theirs lacked, so it was sort of a draw.

    I got more out of attending the Techshop training classes than I did from using their hardware. I was able to take a 4 hour intro to MIG class and another one on TIG welding. I learned enough to get over my fear of burning down the house. I also learned enough about the welding machines that I could talk to the sellers intelligently when I went to buy one.

    I'm sorry they are gone. I always had in the back of my mind the possibility of using their services if I had to do something that exceeds the capabilities of my shop.

    Dan

    Leave a comment:


  • J Tiers
    replied
    Originally posted by tomato coupe View Post
    Is this an apples to apples comparison, i.e. are your lathe and mill comparable to what these places provided?
    Read the whole post

    Leave a comment:


  • tomato coupe
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    If you look at it, in a year, a person would spend as much on the membership ($1440) as I did on both lathe and mill added up ( I am even including the parts to repair the used equipment), plus a bit for tooling.
    Is this an apples to apples comparison, i.e. are your lathe and mill comparable to what these places provided?

    Leave a comment:


  • Machine
    replied
    Originally posted by yarrrrr View Post
    I used the one here in SF. Great resource (especially if you lived in an apt!). Sure, it had its flaws, but it was a great resource for learning and getting stuff done. Even had a good bar next door. I eventually got into a house and bought my own machines, but it will be missed. -Justin
    Does "got into" a house mean bought a house in SF? If so, how long have you been a multi-millionaire?

    Leave a comment:


  • RB211
    replied
    Having a used South Bend lathe for 500$ in your garage would take you further

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  • Dan Dubeau
    replied
    Really too bad they couldn't make it. I loved the idea of techshop.

    I live a bit far from any major cities where a place like that could actually survive, but if I had access to large water jet, plasma or laser cutting machines I'd probably be a member of a place like that. I've got a lot of things I'd like to build that having a CNC plasma, or access to one would be very beneficial. They really are so fast and efficient at what they do that I really don't have the interest in going back to the old way (my old way) of jigsaws and angle grinders for sheet and plate work. There's a local guy here that's done some work in the past for me, but his prices vary wildly depending on if the rent is due or not... it's tough to budget or price stuff out. I need to find another source I guess. The rest of the machines offered in a space like that I pretty much already have, or have access too. Although having access to a large paint booth would be nice the odd time I actually want to paint something (I hate painting)

    Leave a comment:

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