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Replacement Motor for Clausing 15" Variable Speed Drill Press

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  • Replacement Motor for Clausing 15" Variable Speed Drill Press

    Good Morning All,

    As the title says, I am looking for a replacement motor for my vintage Clausing 15" Drill Press. I posted this in PM as well and explained that while drilling a faceplate, I heard a bang and the quill stopped turning but the motor kept running. The motor shaft sheared right at the base where it enters the case of the motor. There were no warning signs and it certainly was not from abuse since I have owned it the past 15-20 years but I am not sure prior to that.

    In any event, it is a variable speed (mechanical) press with a single phase 1140 RPM, NEMA 56 frame motor. I am considering going 3 phase with VFD but I have sticker shock at the cost of new motors both single and three phase. Even EBay, if you can find an 1140 rpm motor with the proper frame, prices are crazy and shipping is a deal breaker.

    I did find a nice new Baldor at a great price, but it is a 143T frame which I do not believe will bolt to the press and it has a 7/8" shaft as opposed to the 56 frames 5/8" shaft.

    Any suggestions, leads, advice and/or insight would be appreciated. I certainly want to get the drill press up and running but hoping not the break the bank and have it cost literally more than I paid for the press in the process.

    Thanks in advance for your assistance,

    Joe
    Last edited by jbacc; 11-29-2017, 06:51 AM.

  • #2
    56 is the most common frame size. Maybe short term you could replace it with a 1725rpm motor to get you going until you can decide what you want to do. 1140 rpm motors are relatively scarce, especially single phase. A 3 phase 1725 motor and a VFD would give you a wider speed control, plus reverse. If you go with a larger HP motor you would not loose any power at low speeds.
    CPeter
    Grantham, New Hampshire

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    • #3
      Hi Peter, I appreciate the reply. I have a 3450 3 phase motor already but that is way too fast even with a VFD and I have considered a 1750 RPM motor but concerned that it too it too fast even with VFD. I am concerned about losing torque at the slower speeds. Your ideas make a lot of sense and I appreciate you sharing them.

      Thank you,

      Joe

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      • #4
        A vector type vfd is better at not loosing torque at lower speeds than a regular one if you specifically source one of them. I'd run the 1750 and use the vfd to drop it down in conjuction with the existing geartrain. Just bear in mind if you run the motor really slowly, then the motor might overheat because the cooling fan is also running underspeed, one of my vfd equipped machines has a small mains powered fan to do this function to avoid this.
        I usually source old motors from junkyards etc and put new bearings and things in when needed and tend to pick up vfd's from ebay when one appears at a really good price. I'd get sticker shock too at the price of new parts for this.
        The only time I've really got stuck with converting is with a vector type vfd that had to have a encoder on the motor to function, normally you can put them in current sense mode but not this model, but it was cheapy cheap. Its mated to a 2hp harrison 3ph motor from the 50's, so I added a cheap ebay encoder to the drive pulley and a few resistors to make it compatible with the vfd levels expected.
        Last edited by MrFluffy; 11-29-2017, 08:47 AM.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by MrFluffy View Post
          A vector type vfd is better at not loosing torque at lower speeds than a regular one if you specifically source one of them. I'd run the 1750 and use the vfd to drop it down in conjuction with the existing geartrain. Just bear in mind if you run the motor really slowly, then the motor might overheat because the cooling fan is also running underspeed, one of my vfd equipped machines has a small mains powered fan to do this function to avoid this.
          I usually source old motors from junkyards etc and put new bearings and things in when needed and tend to pick up vfd's from ebay when one appears at a really good price. I'd get sticker shock too at the price of new parts for this.
          The only time I've really got stuck with converting is with a vector type vfd that had to have a encoder on the motor to function, normally you can put them in current sense mode but not this model, but it was cheapy cheap. Its mated to a 2hp harrison 3ph motor from the 50's, so I added a cheap ebay encoder to the drive pulley and a few resistors to make it compatible with the vfd levels expected.
          Mr., thanks so much for your insight and advice. You obviously have a lot on knowledge with regards to electronics and vector drives, may I ask in the current crop of VFDS's if you have a favorite? VFD's are another area where one is overwhelmed with information and to the untrained, it's almost impossible to decide what might work best while keeping price in mind as well.

          Thanks again,

          Joe

          Comment


          • #6
            All motors will give a buyer sticker shock if purchased new at retail pricing. Craigslist in my area shows quite a variety of used motors on a regular basis. Most are reasonably priced, with others apparently the seller looked at retail pricing and priced accordingly.

            Used 3 phase motors should be readily available at scrap yards (if you have scrap yards in your locale). Used 3 phase are much less of a risk in buying than single phase. 3 phase motors don't have the capacitors and starting mechanisms that are many times problems with used single phase motors.

            I'm sure if I put my mind to it I could hit my local haunts and come up with a 1750 rpm motor today, 1150 would be a challenge. I would expect to find a motor for under 50 bucks.

            A 120V input VFD (230V 3 phase output, 1 hp) could be sourced from various online dealers for $150.


            Maybe if you posted your location other forum members might point you to a source of motors.

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