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What Good is 1.5mb Internet Down Load Speed ?? OT

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  • What Good is 1.5mb Internet Down Load Speed ?? OT

    I've been looking at property in a couple other states. One of my concerns is a good internet connection. What I'm finding is most places only have DSL or some type of service via satellite, such as Hughesnet with download speeds of 1.5mb and upload speeds of around 20mb.
    I'm wondering how well that speed would work with my IP security cameras???? Any answers that I get from the providers is no problem, of course they want to make a sale. I'm sure I can get an accurate answer here from someone with real experience.

    JL...............

  • #2
    It all depends on what you're used to. Do you really need your IP security cameras accessible over the internet, or only on your local network? 20mb downstream and 1.5mb upstream is a basic internet service but should be more than sufficient for farting around on the internet. If you want to download large files then you'll want more, but still doable with 20mb. I have 1gb internet from Xfinity but it behaves more like 20mb when accessing many sites due to bandwidth throttling all over the place. It really shines when using bit torrent however.

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    • #3
      I use DSL and have not had any problems watching Youtubes, Netflix, etc. I don't upload much so it's not an issue for me. The service is called 5/2 but it's actually 3/1 when I have speed tested it. I think being within a certain distance of the switching station makes a big difference in the quality of service you get.

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      • #4
        Its a function of resolution and refresh rate. I installed DVRs accessed over the Internet before most folks even had internet service, and only businesses tended to have connections other than dial up. Depending on the amount sharing is diminishing your bandwidth you can view one cam in hi res or multiple cams in lower res with a fair refresh rate. On one site I found that every afternoon one of their DVRs became slow and cludgy to view and review. Turned out they had a 10mps fiberlink under the road, and the rest of their network traffic was causing a bottleneck depending on which side of the road you were reviewing video from. I upgraded their fiber translator to 100mps and their whole network performed better. Their IT person didn't want to mess with it so I did it when he wasn't around. Boom. Problem fixed. LOL. Never told them. Just fixed it.

        FYI: For just live viewing I like IpCamViewer by Robert Chou out of Hong Kong for remote viewing on mobile platforms. He has a LITE version that will allow upto 6 cameras (channels). The full version is unlimited. You can stream video from multiple sources, locations, brands, and models simultaneously. Its also nice that you can manage any of your cameras/channels into groups. Outside, Shop floor, Doorways, Machines, etc... For rewinding and review I've found that usually only the OEM client software does that reliably. I'm out of the business now, but I demoed tons of OEM and third party mobile aps. I still use IPCamViewer everyday.
        Last edited by Bob La Londe; 11-29-2017, 01:18 PM.
        *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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        • #5
          I suffered with DirecPC/Hughesnet for years. It's teerible, plus they fib and they lie.

          1) It's very bursty. I couldn't use Skype because it
          would br

          eak up my s


          peach into li

          ttle bunches.

          2) FAP - "Fair Access Program" which actually means "We sold more bandwidth than we own". I had DirecPC before it was FAPped. I could use whatever I could get. After FAP I was limited to something like 200 MByte/day. Thats 3 or 4 YouTube videos. After that they throttle you for 24 hours... and by throttle I mean STRANGLE. You get worse than 50 KBaud dial up. If you use too much during those 24 hours, you get FAPped for another 24 hours.

          3) They don't warn you that you are getting close to FAP. I had a talk with an honest technician (probably got fired after this) and he said that warning people would allow people to use most of their 200 MByte a day. But by making them fearful of punishment without notice, people tended to use only about 60% of their allocation.

          4) They say "Unlimited broadband" ... read the fine print. Unlimited between 2 AM and 6 AM. However, if you start a download at 3 AM and it finishes at 6:20, you can be dinged for part of that download against your FAP. Oh yeah.

          5) They LIE. I kept getting FAPped when I was sure I shouldn't. So, I used Linux and literally counted every bloody byte sent/received for 4 days. I would count something like 120 MByte, including parity, wrappers, etc... But Hughesnet would claim I had used 180 MByte. They seemed to have at least 50% overhead.

          Hughesnet is a rip off. I detest them. If I lost my DSL I would rent co-space in a shared office space in the village 5 miles from here so I could use DSL before I would use Hughesnet.

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          • #6
            LOL. Yeah DirecPC was a joke from day one. I was technically a dealer when it still required a phone for the up side. I installed a total of two systems. I installed a demo in my office, and immediately decided I would not inflict that dark humor on my customers. I had a friend who hounded me to install one for him. I refused for a couple months, and finally one day at lunch I told him I'd install it, but if he was unhappy I didn't want to hear a word about it. Well, I heard a word about it. Actually three. "You were right." LOL.

            Starband was decent for several years, but I have heard they are now overloaded. My dad was an installer and troubleshooter for them for several years.
            *** I always wanted a welding stinger that looked like the north end of a south bound chicken. Often my welds look like somebody pointed the wrong end of a chicken at the joint and squeezed until something came out. Might as well look the part.

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            • #7
              I'm assuming you are meaning 1.5 Mbps. (mega-bits per second). 1,500,000 bps comes out to roughly 150,000 BYTES per second (150KBps).

              It's certainly usable. You have to adjust your expectations a little. A 200KB picture will take a bit over a second to download. If there are 10 pictures in a thread it may take a while, but the text should show up immediately so you can read that while the pictures download. Downloading the newest firefox (51MB) will take a while longer, around 5 minutes if all goes well.

              One thing to keep in mind is that the web sites that you get information from have to share their internet connection with all the customers. If they have a T3 (45 Mbps) and 100 people downloading 3 MB pictures, the average user only gets around 4 Mbps MAX. BUT... if that web site uses an ISP that only has a 1.5 Gbps connection to their peers, that connection will be shared with many thousands of users, so the actual throughput may fall off even further.

              For the purposes of your security cams... some cams support multiple data streams. You can set one to high quality for your video recorder and one to low quality (640x480) for access from the internet.

              Dan
              At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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              • #8
                Little 'b' for bits, Big 'B' for bytes,

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                • #9
                  I only live 3 miles from a small town & pay for 3, usually get about 2.7 & it does everything we need, watch movies run 2 PCs & I can snipe Ebay at 2 seconds & have 1 second left. We don't have a dish it's over the phone line. The company's put cable everywhere else but here but it's all farms so few customers. I see it roled up in a coil on the pole 1.3 miles away & they've laid the tubes to run it thru. Will be nice when it finally gets here.
                  "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                  world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                  country, in easy stages."
                  ~ James Madison

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                    It all depends on what you're used to. Do you really need your IP security cameras accessible over the internet, or only on your local network? 20mb downstream and 1.5mb upstream is a basic internet service but should be more than sufficient for farting around on the internet. If you want to download large files then you'll want more, but still doable with 20mb. I have 1gb internet from Xfinity but it behaves more like 20mb when accessing many sites due to bandwidth throttling all over the place. It really shines when using bit torrent however.
                    It's the other way around........20 up and 1.5 down.

                    JL....................

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by JoeLee View Post
                      It's the other way around........20 up and 1.5 down.JL....................
                      Are you on the top of a hill? Uploading is data you're sending (like URL requests). Downloading is the data you're receiving. A non-symmetrical internet connection is almost always limited on the upload side compared to the download side. What service provider is claiming 20 up and 1.5 down? That's VERY unusual.

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                      • #12
                        I also vote for "NO Satellite".. I had WildBlue a while back.. It was internet, and it wasn't too too bad..
                        The delay up and down to the satellite is really really annoying...

                        But getting FAPed... That really really sucks. And like the other guys said, it messes you up for quite a while.

                        I would consider it an absolute LAST resort.. I'd go for an unlimited cell plan and use my phone as a hot spot before
                        I ever considered satellite again.


                        One suggestion I have.. Look for any microwave wireless companies in the area you are looking at.. They are NEVER
                        national companies, usually little local companies and they install their antennas on cell phone towers. I had it from
                        2004-2010, little antenna on my roof ($100 install, $50 a month) and it was twice as fast as the DSL I have at my house
                        NOW.. And I was hitting a cell tower 8 miles down the valley.

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                        • #13
                          No experience with security cameras but in general the problem with satellite ISP is bandwidth. Your bandwidth will be rationed, and as Dan_the_chemist pointed out, the way they go about it is bull puckey.

                          I've upgraded my satellite service several times yet in practice I have more problems with bandwidth now than when I started out with their low-end package. For one thing internet applications continue to use more and more bandwidth, for another thing the ISP goes by the ISP's measurement of bandwidth, not by your measurement of bandwidth. Even when you're not on the computer, the satellite modem alone uses bandwidth to maintain contact with the satellite. Regardless of how much bandwidth you are promised, you WILL run out of bandwidth.

                          One learns to use the internet for only bare essentials, to avoid videos and software updates like the plague, and don't even think about downloading movies. I would forget about livestreaming security cameras.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                            Are you on the top of a hill? Uploading is data you're sending (like URL requests). Downloading is the data you're receiving. A non-symmetrical internet connection is almost always limited on the upload side compared to the download side. What service provider is claiming 20 up and 1.5 down? That's VERY unusual.
                            That was my thought as well. I was assuming JoeLee just made a typo in the OP or had got the up/down mixed up, but ?? I can't figure why anyone would provide 20 up and 1.5 down.

                            20 down is still twice as fast as I'm using at home, which is fine for streaming Netflix movies and whatnot. Nothing to complain about IMO.

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                            • #15
                              We went from dial up to fiber......from walking next to the free way to a Corvette in the boogey lane.
                              25Mbps up and down for 50.00 a month.....and we have the cheapest level.

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