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  • Wiltshire Hand Files

    I picked up some Wiltshire hand files a few years back,they seem to be very good.Have used them a lot and still very sharp,made in Australia.Any one else use this brand.

  • #2
    The old Aussie made one are excellent. Just got the last one out of the box of flat ones I picked up cheap many years ago.
    Nev.

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    • #3
      Being an Aussie , like Nifty, I have a drawer full of them. (probably 99% of my files are Wiltshire) Some go back to when I started my apprenticeship in Dec 1974. Some I have are even older.
      Made back when Australia had a good manufacturing industry.
      peter

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      • #4
        I dont know anything about the files or company. I am interested in Australian industrial products though. JR
        My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

        https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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        • #5
          Kitts Industrial Tools has Nicholson files in their catalog stating "Made in USA". I thought Nicholson production moved off-shore five or more years ago. The prices are great. Almost too great for a USA product. Apex Tool Group now owns Nicholson. The same group that owns the old mainstays like Allen, Delta, Cleco, Jacobs, Wiss, Weller, SATA, Armstrong, Crescent and Lufkin. (And many more.)

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          • #6
            Never heard of that brand but I'd just like to add that it's tough to find good files anymore.

            I never really knew what a good file was until about 20 years ago I splurged and got some Sandvik files (yes, at the time they made files, no more though it seems). I'm still using the big lathe file. It still works well even though it's showing its age. But it's still pretty good and resists pinning quite well. Not as good as it was but still better than new cheaply made stuff.

            Some recently bought Jet files are pretty good. Not as good as the Sandviks but pretty good and certainly better than the Indian made stuff I tried in the past. And offshore or not some Nicholson files were OK. Again not great like in the past but still better than the no name crap by a country mile.

            In this age of power tools I suspect that files are just not seen as important enough to justify the cost for nice ones. But it's a shame because with good files doing good work is far more easy than some might believe..... there I go sounding all curmudgeon'y again....

            Who does make good files still? I figure if I can get one more lathe file that lasts and works like the Sandvik I've got I'll be set for life.
            Chilliwack BC, Canada

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            • #7
              Originally posted by BCRider View Post
              Never heard of that brand but I'd just like to add that it's tough to find good files anymore.

              I never really knew what a good file was until about 20 years ago I splurged and got some Sandvik files (yes, at the time they made files, no more though it seems). I'm still using the big lathe file. It still works well even though it's showing its age. But it's still pretty good and resists pinning quite well. Not as good as it was but still better than new cheaply made stuff.

              Some recently bought Jet files are pretty good. Not as good as the Sandviks but pretty good and certainly better than the Indian made stuff I tried in the past. And offshore or not some Nicholson files were OK. Again not great like in the past but still better than the no name crap by a country mile.

              In this age of power tools I suspect that files are just not seen as important enough to justify the cost for nice ones. But it's a shame because with good files doing good work is far more easy than some might believe..... there I go sounding all curmudgeon'y again....

              Who does make good files still? I figure if I can get one more lathe file that lasts and works like the Sandvik I've got I'll be set for life.
              I think someone dared to mention on PM site that HF files are actually reasonably good.

              Sandvik was same as Bahco at one point but since Snap-On bought out the Bahco part the files have not been the same. Todays Bahco files are made in Portugal instead of Sweden. They are not bad but nothing spectacular either IMO.
              Finnish file maker Viiala went in the same crappola. Some Bahco/Snapo-on files are apparently still sold under Viiala name as it seem to have very good reputation in some circles.

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              • #8
                I will go back and see if they have more NOS,got some USA Nichilson NOS Machete Files at Princess Auto a few years back similar cut to Lathe cut but 3 sqaure work well.Just ordered some Pferd files made in Germany since 1799, they have excellent abrasives as well.Worked with friend that was Iron Worker for 30 yrs. and a hardcore Walter guy,after he used the Pferd zip blades was amazed at the qaulity and I get the 4-1/2" for $1 Can.

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                • #9
                  Vallorbe and Pferd are about the only brand name files left beside Bahco/crap-on.

                  Grobet was quality Swiss made file but apparently now at least American market is filled with "Grobet USA" marked files that are made in china and not a quality you would expect.

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                  • #10
                    Too bad about Bahco.. have been a fan for years. I have some ultralight pruners and a bowsaw that amaze me everytime I use them.. guess they worked too well for too little money..some bean counter somewhere saw an 'opportunity'. Good thing I have a stash of blades.
                    Last edited by softtail; 12-02-2017, 02:46 PM.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by softtail View Post
                      Too bad about Bahco.. have been a fan for years. I have some ultralight pruners and a bowsaw that amaze me everytime I use them.. guess they worked too well for too little money..some bean counter somewhere saw an 'opportunity'. Good thing I have a stash of blades.
                      Decline on files is not that bad as adjustable/crescent wrenches or some asian import socket sets sold under Bahco name ( they do sell US made Snap-on tools also under bahco brand so go figure..)

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by BCRider View Post
                        Never heard of that brand but I'd just like to add that it's tough to find good files anymore.

                        I never really knew what a good file was until about 20 years ago I splurged and got some Sandvik files (yes, at the time they made files, no more though it seems). I'm still using the big lathe file. It still works well even though it's showing its age. But it's still pretty good and resists pinning quite well. Not as good as it was but still better than new cheaply made stuff.

                        Some recently bought Jet files are pretty good. Not as good as the Sandviks but pretty good and certainly better than the Indian made stuff I tried in the past. And offshore or not some Nicholson files were OK. Again not great like in the past but still better than the no name crap by a country mile.

                        In this age of power tools I suspect that files are just not seen as important enough to justify the cost for nice ones. But it's a shame because with good files doing good work is far more easy than some might believe..... there I go sounding all curmudgeon'y again....

                        Who does make good files still? I figure if I can get one more lathe file that lasts and works like the Sandvik I've got I'll be set for life.
                        For the BC and Alberta guys, I always got good ones from Thomas Skinner..
                        The wavy cut ones were excellent, can't remember the brand.

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          For those less file savvy individuals on this forum, how does one tell a great file from an OK file? How do you determine whether any of those
                          files you found at the garage sale are worth buying?
                          Location: Long Island, N.Y.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Run them between thumb and forefinger, with light pressure sed how grabby they feel.
                            Worn out files can be a real time waster?

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichR View Post
                              For those less file savvy individuals on this forum, how does one tell a great file from an OK file? How do you determine whether any of those
                              files you found at the garage sale are worth buying?
                              How they are stored/shipped (ebay) is a big indicator. They can't be rattling around against each other, or the bottom of a tool box. I'm a bit overboard on files.. some male neurosis akin to collecting vises, anvils, sharpening stones, etc etc. Most files found in second hand/used arenas are trashed unless nos. Looking at files under magnification is instructive as far as seeing what can happen to the teeth. Silver streaks running the length but thinning towards the ends are actually where the teeth have broken off and the roots being thicker metal reflect the light better looking like silver streaks.

                              I've found some cool files.. many pre 1900 a few of which upon further research I found out were dental files.

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