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1960 Colchester Batman 100 dollar lathe (Youtube)

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  • 1960 Colchester Batman 100 dollar lathe (Youtube)

    1960 Colchester Batman 200 dollar lathe (Youtube)

    There may be hope for the young guys. There are 11 videos of there guys rebuilding a 1960 lathe bought for 200 dollars.

    Most of it is in time lapse but if someone was thinking about rebuilding a lathe, this would be something to watch before taking it on.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GTEUXiDoCLc
    Last edited by outlawspeeder; 12-03-2017, 10:18 AM.

  • #2
    The Bantam is a cracking little machine. I did similar by starting with this:



    And turning it into this:



    It was a whole lot of work.
    Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

    Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
    Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
    Monarch 10EE 1942

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    • #3
      Did they finish their surface grinder?
      Andy

      Comment


      • #4
        Hmmmm.

        In #1, I already saw a good deal of stuff I would not do, but it's not my machine.......

        #2 likewise, but more.

        #3 even more, in spades, doubled.

        I suppose the best I can say is that "Just 'cause it's shiny don't mean it's necessarily RIGHT".

        That aside, a lot of work, and a good effort.
        Last edited by J Tiers; 12-03-2017, 11:45 AM.
        1601

        Keep eye on ball.
        Hashim Khan

        Comment


        • #5
          Bantams are nice little lathes. I bought a used one because I had a ton of D1-3 spindle tooling, Jacobs Rubberflex collet setup, Sjogren 5C nose mount collet closer and Buck Adjust-Tru chucks. Main problem with them is small through hole in spindle.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Peter. View Post
            The Bantam is a cracking little machine...And turning it into this:



            It was a whole lot of work.
            Wow, that is a glorious resto. Not sure if it was just cosmetic or involved reworking the wearing surfaces, but it sure looks good!

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Peter. View Post
              The Bantam is a cracking little machine. I did similar by starting with this:



              And turning it into this:



              It was a whole lot of work.
              Excellent job!!!

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by Machine View Post
                Wow, that is a glorious resto. Not sure if it was just cosmetic or involved reworking the wearing surfaces, but it sure looks good!
                I had to scrape in the cross slide and compound ways & swivel mount but the main bedways I left well alone. Headstock is adjustable on these so I didn't have to scrape that into any sort of alignment.
                Peter - novice home machinist, modern motorcycle enthusiast.

                Denford Viceroy 280 Synchro (11 x 24)
                Herbert 0V adapted to R8 by 'Sir John'.
                Monarch 10EE 1942

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by outlawspeeder View Post

                  Most of it is in time lapse but if someone was thinking about rebuilding a lathe, this would be something to watch before taking it on.
                  sorry to be negative, but imo that is not how to do it guide. I mean it looks nice, but machine tool aesthetics should lbe ogarithmic orders of magnitude less important than mechanical integrity (in fairness is skimmed through, but don't think I'm wrong). That's not rebuilding or reconditioning, its cleaning and painting.
                  .

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                    sorry to be negative, but imo that is not how to do it guide. I mean it looks nice, but machine tool aesthetics should lbe ogarithmic orders of magnitude less important than mechanical integrity (in fairness is skimmed through, but don't think I'm wrong). That's not rebuilding or reconditioning, its cleaning and painting.
                    TOTALLY TRUE.

                    Did you catch the part where they appeared to be rubbing crosslide ways with abrasive stones? I will use closed coat fine sandpaper if I have to, but not in the way they were doing....

                    Every case where they had an opportunity to clean a part with either a wire wheel, or a careful by-hand cleaning, soak in purple cleaner etc, they seem to have opted for the wire wheel every time.... They did gears with the wire wheel, gears that were only dirty, not rusted.

                    It is not even a good clean and paint process being shown. It's a borderline hack job.

                    Oh, yeah, the "scraping"...... They had beaucoup to fix, several thou. At least according to their measuring gizmo, which may, or may not, be giving them good answers. Actually, it probably did give decent answers, as far as it went.

                    NO , they did not start shoveling off material where they needed to, they were doing what Richard King would probably call "chicken scratching".... When you have some thou to remove, you need to have a cloud of chips ahead of the scraper or you will be there for years. You need to be seeing a PILE of scraping chips.

                    You CAN do a longer way with a shorter straightedge, but it is not easy, there are a bunch of "gotchas", no clue if they "get" that, but I suspect not.

                    Bottom line, "Do, or do not do. There is no 'try', "..... Mr Spelberg was right.
                    Last edited by J Tiers; 12-04-2017, 01:10 PM.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

                    Comment

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