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Corrosion protection for times where oil is not a good idea?

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  • Corrosion protection for times where oil is not a good idea?

    My grinding rests and tables and my welding area have steel surfaces that are tending to rust on me. Any good ideas for something to use on these to cut down the rust while not being sticky and holding the grit from grinding?

    I was just about to slather things down with some good ol Johnson's floor wax and thought I'd check with the collective first. I'm not keen on the wax idea simply because paraffin wax which is a key component in the floor wax is also flammable. But I figured that a thin wipe of the stuff might be OK.

    Alternatives?

    I wouldn't mind if it was fairly slippery too. The key surfaces needing this protection are the ram on my welding bench vise which has a round section bare metal ram, the bench grinder rests and the tables on my tool grinder. And on all of those some lubricity would not be a bad idea.

  • #2
    I use two products-

    CRC 3-36 for general spray on protection. Dries, lubricates and protects well. Get it by the gallon and load up a squirt bottle. Apply to everything in your shop.

    "Top Cote" now called Bostik 10220. Wood workers uses this to protect the surface of tables, planners etc. and to literally glide the wood AND it has no transfer. Probably doesn't matter too much for metal working but for wood transfer of any product with silicone in it can be a recipe for disaster at finishing time. Not dirt cheap but a little goes a long way.
    Last edited by lakeside53; 12-07-2017, 09:07 PM.

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    • #3
      Yep, those are the two I use. I've found that the Top Cote is very useful on things other than wood working tools. It will even keep the ice from sticking to door weather striping on my truck!
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        Do you cover any of those machines?

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        • #5
          Agreed - Top Cote is super handy to have on hand. It is very versatile and a can or bottle lasts a long time.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by Glug View Post
            Do you cover any of those machines?
            Was that aimed at me?

            The only things in that area of the shop are the grinders and the welding table where a lot more grinding is done with angle grinders. So no, nothing in that area has covers on it. Dust and grit everywhere but that's what that area is intended for anyway.

            I can also say that a good portion of the rust isn't the metal itself but the steel "dust" that settles onto a lot of the surfaces in that area. But as the dust starts to corrode that starts up the surface below it if that one is bare steel or cast iron. And of course it all glues itself together so it can't be brushed away easily.

            The bench grinders sit on a steel shelf cover. That particular cover is coated with 3 coats of polyurethane varnish. It's holding up really well even where the spark spray off the bench grinders is hitting it. I've always intended to put a sacrificial piece at those spots to deflect the sparks. But haven't quite got there yet and it doesn't seem to matter.
            Last edited by BCRider; 12-07-2017, 09:59 PM.

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            • #7
              I like this stuff

              3-IN-ONE 10041 Professional Silicone Spray Lubricant

              Multi-use motorcycle chain lube and general corrosion protection.

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              • #8
                I HATE SILICONE!!! The only silicone in the shop is a small tube of di-electric grease kept in a zip lock.
                I have fought silicone contamination since the beginning. A few years ago I emailed Dow-Corning asking if there was any way to clean silicone (any type or viscosity) from a surface. The answer was that nothing short of removing some of the surface would yield clean enough to apply any other coating or caulk. Silicone doesn't even stick to itself!!

                Sorry for the rant but if I can stop failures caused by silicone contamination, it will save some poor souls sanity.

                Pete
                1973 SB 10K .
                BenchMaster mill.

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                • #9
                  Nothing like silicone in spray-on furniture waxes to give you a heartache... I told my wife if she ever uses that to forget me refinishing anything.

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                  • #10
                    For smooth surfaces, I have found that some "freeze mist" (used in electronic troubleshooting) types will dissolve and wash away silicones. The item obviously gets very cold, which means it cannot be used on everything.

                    As to whether they will get as squeaky clean as you need for paint, I never tried that.
                    1601

                    Keep eye on ball.
                    Hashim Khan

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                    • #11
                      A super thin coat of wax like you're likely to have in this application isn't likely to burn. Well, to be more exact if it does burn it won't hold enough heat to get anything else to burn.

                      You may want to check out the table saw protector products. That sounds like a very similar use case: protect against corrosion (rust) and allow things to slide on the surface. I don't remember what the current favorite of rec.woodworking is, I use Johnson's Paste Wax and it works for me. It doesn't work so well in other parts of the country, though.

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                      • #12
                        Silicone in some form is what makes the Hammerite finish. For me one speck makes a damn big fish-eye in the wrong place. Auto painters have some product to help remove it - it's a curse for them too.
                        Last edited by lakeside53; 12-08-2017, 01:25 AM.

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                        • #13
                          A coating of wax on iron is not going to burn unless it has help, it will never get to ignition temp unless the iron is that hot.
                          1601

                          Keep eye on ball.
                          Hashim Khan

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                          • #14
                            I went for Johnson's paste wax on my table saw and my drill press's and I am very happy, very slippery! Not only the table saw top but the tube rails for the fence, it has never worked better.

                            Anyone have a recommendation for bare steel shafts? I have a sawmill that sits outside under a tarp and would like the shafts to stay somewhat rust free. I keep coming up with cosmoline but haven't bought any yet.

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                            • #15
                              LPS-3 is what I used on my sawmill.
                              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                              country, in easy stages."
                              ~ James Madison

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