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Relative newbie question on internal threading?

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  • #16
    I've yet to NOT get burrs even with freshly sharpened tools. Pretty much anything other than the last couple of one thou whisker cuts or a spring cut raises a burr when I do single point cuts.
    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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    • #17
      Originally posted by BCRider View Post
      I've yet to NOT get burrs even with freshly sharpened tools. Pretty much anything other than the last couple of one thou whisker cuts or a spring cut raises a burr when I do single point cuts.
      I'll have to get out the magnifier to see how much burr there is.

      When I first started I'd end up with a sharp crest that needed to be filed off to get the proper form. I've never noticed a burr since I learned to thread properly.

      Dan
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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      • #18
        Nothing like 1018/A36 to raise burrs when threading at typical HSM speeds.

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        • #19
          Originally posted by BCRider View Post

          I really like the idea of a rubberized abrasive block for this. Lakeside, what sort of Cratex (or other brand) tool are you using for that operation?

          No tool... I just hold a bar (maybe 1/4x1x6) of it on the outside by hand for a few passes. Really works well. for small internal just thread in the round size that fits; for larger, back to a stick of it.

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          • #20
            Originally posted by BCRider View Post
            I've yet to NOT get burrs even with freshly sharpened tools. Pretty much anything other than the last couple of one thou whisker cuts or a spring cut raises a burr when I do single point cuts.
            You pretty much HAVE to.....

            Think about it.... no cutter is perfectly sharp, so as it cuts the metal, it has some effect of pushing and lifting the chip as it is cut off. "Displacing metal", which puts pressure on the uncut metal next to the cut. There are constraints on where it can go. The bulk of uncut metal prevents it moving inwards or sideways, the cutter prevents it moving toward the cutter. Only moving toward the OD is left.

            Because nothing is supporting that metal on the OD, it pushes outwards in the only "free" direction there is, forming a burr on the OD.

            With a perfectly sharp tool, an infinitesimal edge of infinite strength, and a material that cuts perfectly freely, there might be no burr. While I would like to work with that stuff, I have never seen any for sale. There is only material that is "sorta like that" and has "less burr". But not zero.
            1601

            Keep eye on ball.
            Hashim Khan

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