Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Shop-built vise from railroad track

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    Last time I checked local scrap yards were only paying 8¢ per pound for steel. They were charging local buyers and scrap pickers 30-50¢ depending on how much they bought. That's less than $30 at scrap prices. Some mills might pay more in large lots because its a known grade of steel, but in a world where sometimes companies scrap machines worth thousands of dollars it not out of the scope of possibility.
    Here, the rate is 5 cents a pound for the junk yard buying and 25 cents if you buy from them. I just last week bought a 20hp onan engine in mint shape with only 880 hours and a onan generator also in mint shape. I'm lucky that some of the yards here still let you buy from them. I moved here from Rochester NY about 5 years ago and none of the yards there would sell to anyone. (even employees in some cases)

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by metalmagpie View Post
    Around here if you show up with a bunch of railroad steel the scrap yards won't touch it. They say that steel belongs to the railroad.
    I was just talking scrap steel price in general. I've been told they won't take it too.

    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
    That is pretty cheap.
    Yep. They don't pay squat for scrap metal. I suppose that's why I can buy drops at my local steel vendor for around 50¢ a pound. Less for larger quantities.

    Leave a comment:


  • The Artful Bodger
    replied
    They laid the tracks through this town almost 150 years ago and sometime since then the original rails have been lifted and used for all manner of things, frames for station buildings (especially platform shelters), fences, cattle yards and no doubt quite a few anvils as well!

    Leave a comment:


  • metalmagpie
    replied
    Around here if you show up with a bunch of railroad steel the scrap yards won't touch it. They say that steel belongs to the railroad.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by Bob La Londe View Post
    Last time I checked local scrap yards were only paying 8¢ per pound for steel. They were charging local buyers and scrap pickers 30-50¢ depending on how much they bought. That's less than $30 at scrap prices. Some mills might pay more in large lots because its a known grade of steel, but in a world where sometimes companies scrap machines worth thousands of dollars it not out of the scope of possibility.
    That is pretty cheap.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
    At 115 pounds a yard (that's how RR track is graded- pounds per yard. 115lb rail is pretty common), I can't see a scrap crew giving away that much weight.
    Last time I checked local scrap yards were only paying 8¢ per pound for steel. They were charging local buyers and scrap pickers 30-50¢ depending on how much they bought. That's less than $30 at scrap prices. Some mills might pay more in large lots because its a known grade of steel, but in a world where sometimes companies scrap machines worth thousands of dollars it not out of the scope of possibility.

    Leave a comment:


  • CarlByrns
    replied
    Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
    Next time ask for a 12 foot section and I'm sure they would be more than happy to let you remove it and haul away
    At 115 pounds a yard (that's how RR track is graded- pounds per yard. 115lb rail is pretty common), I can't see a scrap crew giving away that much weight.

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Originally posted by Seastar View Post
    It's an interesting video and the guy is obviously skilled and talented with an angle grinder. There are some clever machining "workarounds" presented.
    However, my foremost thought at the end was "What an incredible waste of time and talent".
    That guy should have built a milling machine instead of a cheap weak vise.
    Bill
    So are expressing definitively that a welded steel vise is weaker than a "cheap" cast iron vise of similar size?

    If he needed a vise that's what he should have built. He could build the best milling machine in the world and he still wouldn't have a vise. LOL

    Leave a comment:


  • Seastar
    replied
    It's an interesting video and the guy is obviously skilled and talented with an angle grinder. There are some clever machining "workarounds" presented.
    However, my foremost thought at the end was "What an incredible waste of time and talent".
    That guy should have built a milling machine instead of a cheap weak vise.
    Bill

    Leave a comment:


  • QSIMDO
    replied
    SERIOUS cred here!
    I have a small section of rail for use as a bench anvil that came from the rail siding of the Hendey Machine plant.
    Ha!

    Leave a comment:


  • Dan_the_Chemist
    replied
    Originally posted by larry_g View Post
    There has been a 6' long piece laying along the right of way for the last few years tempting me. ;(
    Give in to the dark side. It's a vise, afterall....

    Leave a comment:


  • Bob La Londe
    replied
    Back to the vise. Its a great small vise, and bolted down properly will probably be much more useful and take more abuse that the typical cast vises people own. I may very well roughly follow his design and make one for my assembly bench.

    I have two bench vises myself. Well two that are mounted to benches anyway. One is an HF cast double swivel vise. It gets used when I need to position things at odd angles, but when I need to really beat on something or use the vise as a press I go to the old Columbia on the other bench.

    Leave a comment:


  • larry_g
    replied
    Originally posted by Planeman41 View Post
    Where does one go to find a piece of railroad track? (I have wondered this for a good while)
    One of my local steel places advertises it. http://www.coyotesteel.com/products_rails.shtml. The SP mainline runs along the edge of my property and there has been a 6' long piece laying along the right of way for the last few years tempting me. ;(

    lg
    no neat sig line

    Leave a comment:


  • alanganes
    replied
    Another source of RR track can be places like quarries, mines, and other heavy industrial facilities where it is used in some types of materiel handling applications. If you have such places where you are, of course.

    Leave a comment:


  • 3 Phase Lightbulb
    Guest replied
    Originally posted by CarlByrns View Post
    I tried to score a 6 inch chunk (to make bookends) from a removal crew- they said they had to account for every inch of the stuff. Of course, maybe they just get tried of people asking.
    Next time ask for a 12 foot section and I'm sure they would be more than happy to let you remove it and haul away

    Leave a comment:

Working...
X