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  • SIP MIG WELDER

    DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY KNOWLEDGE OF A SIP MIGWELDER I.E TOPMIG 150 TURBO HOW GOOD IT IS OR ANY INFO WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED ALISTAIR
    Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

  • #2
    Hi AListair

    <font face="Verdana, Arial" size="2">Originally posted by Alistair Hosie:
    DOES ANYONE HAVE ANY KNOWLEDGE OF A SIP MIGWELDER I.E TOPMIG 150 TURBO HOW GOOD IT IS OR ANY INFO WOULD BE GREATLY APPRECIATED ALISTAIR</font>
    I only have a stick welder, however reading the specs (after doing a net search) it does seem to be a good value for money unit. If a mig welder (drool) was on my purchase list, I would consider this unit.




    ------------------
    Kind regards

    Peter
    Kind regards

    Peter

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    • #3
      Alistair,
      You need to read the spec plate. Welders have duty cycles that are expressed in percent.
      So for this Topig 150 it may well say 60 amp- 100%, 80 amp 90%, 100 amp 80% and so on until you get to the max amperage and this will possible be expressed as low as 150 amp 15%
      These cycles are based on a ten minute cycle so flat out at 150 amp you can weld for 1 1/2 minutes and then have a cup of tea for 8 1/2 minutes and so on. Continous welding is only possible at probably 60 amp.
      Just found the only spec's listed at 92 amp at 40% which is pretty pathetic. This means at 2/3 power it only just over 1/3 effecient.
      Ring them up and ask the 100 % duty cycle.

      Duty cycles and free air capacity of compressors are something manufactures don't want us to know about

      John S.
      .

      Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



      Comment


      • #4
        As a welder first and struggling runner of lathe second I think I can actually have some input here that may be useful.
        John S. got it right....duty cycle is the almost the most important thing, When it comes to welders generally you get what you pay for. The no name machines that are kicking around out there are generally trouble. Miller, Hobart, Lincoln...the big three, are good products. Craftsman, and Linde I've used with good results as well.
        Also, for what it's worth, The 110 volt machines suck, regardless of shape and size.
        Tubo generally regers to airflo so a welder named "turbo" makes me just a little leary.
        Shorty

        Comment


        • #5
          Well I looked around at other options within my budget and although this is not perfect as a mig it is certainly not the worst. For the money it is a pretty good deal.This was آ£365.00 a few weeks ago they are doing it on special for آ£229.00 The cheapest I have seen it anywhere isآ£299.00 currently So all in all I wont be using it comercially just as a hoby from time to time on smallish projects small jigs etc I could have and usually also do look at second hand deals but with a thing like this I figured as the second hand machines which apeared to be in good condition were about the same price as this was new also I have a full warranty.Its not the kind of thing I would try to repair if it went Kapput so I think I did o.k all round thanks again guys hope you are all o'k Alistair
          Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

          Comment


          • #6
            I have three ESAB MIG welders as well as a Lincoln 250 Amp and a 110 volt Lincoln 135, I also have two different Esab plasma arc cutters, an ESAB TIG and a Miller 300SP TIG. My point is they all work very well if the operator sets the machine correctly, prepares the weld correctly and chooses the machine with the specifications needed for the task. Duty cycle is important--so examine what your welding needs are so you buy the correct machine.

            Comment


            • #7
              Alistair
              I feel if you are going to actually use a welder buy a good one and forget the flux cored low cost crap they throw out there. I would sooner gas weld tham use a bad welder - I know my gas welds will hold better that those "battery chargers" with a welder attached.

              Save your money - buy a Lincoln or Miller and never look back (you need 200-660v & 50A service for a proper welder)

              [This message has been edited by Thrud (edited 05-25-2002).]

              Comment


              • #8
                Thrud' I would have liked gas too but my workshop is not conveniently situated at the back of my house .First I have a steep drive then I have to negociate round to the back of the house (big house)then a bit more then up two small flights of stairs then level ground where my workshop is.Don't ask me how I got all my equipment in which includes three lathes (two large woodworking) as well as bench panel saw ,and just bought a new bandsaw which weighs around seven hundred pounds(let the guys from the shop I bought it worry about that one)so weight and dragging them bottles up and down put me off that one.Anyway bought the mig as soon as old Al, get the wire (metaphorically speaking)and gas (small bottle) i will try it out.Alistair
                Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

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                • #9
                  Alistair,
                  You can run a Mig off the Co2 bottles from a pub. You know the small 2" high ones.
                  These aren't that heavy
                  You will need a Co2 regulator as the bottle fitting is different to the argon mix ones.
                  Or change the regulator neck. Argon mic has female nut and cone end to the neck, Co2 has female nut and flat end.

                  John S
                  .

                  Sir John , Earl of Bligeport & Sudspumpwater. MBE [ Motor Bike Engineer ] Nottingham England.



                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Alistair, John

                    Yes I agree about the large bottle thing being a problem if you are not a 400 lb. Gorilla - I have adapted old CO2 extinguisher bottles after having them hydrostatic pressure tested (recertified) for portable use. A 10lb. bottle will last a long time with a flow regulator in home use. I find Carbon Dioxide quite acceptable for MIG welding steel. Hydrogen embrittlement is not a major concern in home or most production use so weld porosity is the only thing that you need to worry about (bubbles in the weld fillet). Argon and Helium are expensive and best for TIG use where they are required.

                    Anything related to life safety such as climbing gear, roll cages, etc. should be TIG or Gas welded and inspected for cracks (zyglo, magnalux, x-ray, ultrasound etc.).

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Thrud I hate to say your wrong thrud but your wrong even for a four hundred pound gorrila their heavy I know I am that beast.Alistair
                      Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Alistair
                        See what pappens when you don't eat all your hagis? Makes you too weak to carry the little things - like oil drums and gas cylinders!

                        I am only telling you this because us little guys have to stick together - it keeps those skinny bastards from getting all the good food at the smorg... (I wonder if that is why they are skinny? Naw, must be the pet tapeworms.)

                        Post Scriptum: Have fun with the new welder and saw!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          If CO2 bottles are too heavy, how about making some home brew, catch the CO2 (and dry it. Might not work, but could be fun getting rid of the failure.

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                          • #14
                            My cousin owns a pub has offered me a gas bottle free and his son will show me how to use it the mig that is not the gas bottle.
                            Haggis well thrud its been a while since I ate haggis have one in the fridge right now afraid to tackle the little varmit.The best haggis as far as I am concerned(I will be shot for saying this comes from a tin)nice and moist.just like the meatloaf at thruds after he removes the outer layer on the lathe and soaks it overnight in sudso.What a treat.no teef required
                            Please excuse my typing as I have a form of parkinsons disease

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Alistair
                              That is what Scotch is for - pouring on hagis and wheaties! (to kill the taste...) I like the part about turning the hard skin off in the lathe! Hey, I have some 3/8" Starlite Diamond endmills they work well on carbon fibre and kevlar composites - with a CNC mill we could make it look like meatloaf again! Maybe.

                              BTW, how many pints will it take to get 12" of weld? &lt;g&gt;

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