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  • jto chuck

    Saw this on Bangood. It's mated to a dc motor about the size you'd find in a typical cordless drill. Specs say it will hold from .3 mm to 4mm. Just a little drill chuck looking like any other except it's smaller. I wonder if it's any good- and whether there are any small drill chucks like this that are good.

    I can imagine buying one only to find out you can't chuck a drill bit concentrically- then it wouldn't be worth having. But if it's accurate enough it would be very handy to use in a micro drill press for pc board work.
    I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

  • #2
    Lee Valley currently have a chuck that goes from 0.3mm-4mm as a special buy, it comes with a hollow arbour so you can choke up on longer bits. At $11.50 I got one, though I haven't done anything to check its accuracy yet. With Lee Valley, as you probably know, you can return it for a full refund, so minimal risk if it is a dud.

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    • #3
      There are some nice chucks that clamp down to .3mm. Problem is they are expensive for their size. I use an Albrecht for my small drill presses. I think there is a jacobs one o4 another. I dont think it is a zero bit chuck though.

      So far in my travels the albrecht is the smallest closing for a drill press. JR
      My old yahoo group. Bridgeport Mill Group

      https://groups.yahoo.com/neo/groups/...port_mill/info

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      • #4
        Can you supply a link? Wandering through 4 or 5 pages of chucks wondering which one you meant.

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        • #5
          https://www.banggood.com/DC-12V-24V-...r_warehouse=CN
          I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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          • #6
            When I needed to drill #70 holes for propane orifices in burners for a kiln project, I salvaged a chuck from an old Foredom Tool. It fit on to a #0 Jacobs taper/#1 Morse arbor from Travers. It worked fine for me.

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            • #7
              I have the Jacobs 0-5/32" JTO chuck in a mini drill press I built. Bought about 15 years ago from KBC and it has proved to be very accurate with almost no run-out on 1/16" or smaller drills. Be prepared for sticker shock though.

              Another possibility is a Vertex (made in Taiwan) as they have a good reputation. Found this source http://www.rotagriponline.com/index....=262&Itemid=29
              I bought a Vertex 0 - 1/4 keyless chuck from them a few years ago and it is a gem.

              Geoff

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              • #8
                I've noticed A lot of the stuff on banggood is like the fishing lure aisle at Canadian tire. %70 (38% of statistics are made up on the spot) of the things were designed to catch fisherman, not fish.

                I've saved chucks from broken drills over the years and made my own arbors for use in collets in the mill. I think I've got 5 or 6 now, and they work great at holding small drills. Many older drills actually came with GOOD chucks and are worth saving. 3/8-24 thread with a shoulder register and they generally run pretty true. I've maybe had to fiddle with 1 or 2 to better concentricity, but I honestly can't remember.

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                • #9
                  I've picked up a number of old NIB Jacobs chucks at sales, usually for no more than $3 or $5. I have a couple of the very small ones that have a range of 0 - 5/32" or so. Same as on my Foredom tool. They are quite accurate.

                  It's always handy to have some extra chucks.
                  1601

                  Keep eye on ball.
                  Hashim Khan

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                  • #10
                    Ok, so I bought one off banggood to settle my curiosity too. It's terrible. For a small chuck you want something tight, with next to no runout. Think tenths. This thing while nice looking, is as sloppy as a manwich. I'm going to put a wooden handle on it, and make a pin vise out of it.

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                    • #11
                      What is a "jto" chuck?

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                      • #12
                        I've had great luck with this DREMEL KEYLESS CHUCK on both my Dremel that I've used for years with it and also with an arbor for a watchmaker's lathe that I turned the thread for the chuck onto a piece of 8mm drill rod. Their reputation was a bit spotty but I think most of it was due to folks never cleaning the darn things out. The one on my Dremel gets wobbly now and then but it's always dust in the chuck. A quick clean and it's back to centering really neatly. And it holds from just over 1/8" down to the #80 that came in my small drill set.

                        Never been brave enough to try drilling anything with a #80 but it fit in the chuck....

                        If you opt for one of these of course you'll need to single point an arbor for it. And of course it'll only be as accurate as the thing that mounts the chuck and arbor. And as folks are saying above tenths count in stuff this small. I would not want more than say a thou of runout on these really small ones. And better if it's less.

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                        • #13
                          Self holding taper that the chuck mounts on. In this case a Jt0, or Jacobs taper 0. The smallest one.

                          https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Machine_taper

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                          • #14
                            I should point out that I didn't turn up a tapered mount for this chuck, I simply mounted it on a 1/8" dowel pin with the provided brass bushing and held in a 5c collet in a hardinge lathe. There was enough visible runout with a dowel pin on the chuck side I didn't even bother with an indicator. The problem is not on the mount side, but with the jaws themselves. They are so loose and sloppy that it would be damn near impossible to chuck something up with little to no runout.

                            I suppose I got a bad one, and if you ordered enough of the damn things you might find one that assembled tight, and worked as it should. But save your money. It's a chuck shape object.

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                            • #15
                              Thanks for that, Dan. I have some in my shopping cart but haven't made the purchase yet. For the very small drill bits I'd be using, I agree- it has to run concentric and not be sloppy. I'm going to think about my own design again- it's spindle and chuck as one unit, with closing of the jaws done from the outboard end of the spindle.
                              I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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