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  • Bored? Want a challenge? Want to make a difference?

    Let's make an open-course textbook on Home Shop Machining.

    I've started it here: https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home_Shop_Machining,
    have created a basic structure, and made more or less progress on the following topics:
    * Drilling Accurate Holes
    * Dealing With Limited Space
    * Turning Between Centers
    * Materials (with the help of HSM residents]
    * Files
    * CAD
    * My old SketchUp Tutorial
    * Cutting Materials
    * Mills

    There are a few pictures acting as place holders as well.

    Edit content or just upload pictures that I can use. Pictures of layout tools, by themselves and in use, equipment, examples of smaller and larger lathes, various attachments, cutters and bits, etc.. Any pictures you actually took and thus fully own the copyrights to. Please upload them to MediaWiki and provide the link. As the owner, you have to upload them to MediaWiki... I can't do that for you. But, if I know they're there, I can use them in the Home Shop Machining course.

    Here's the instructions for uploading (works well for hotlinking pictures in these forums as well):
    1. Go here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
    2. Log in (or create and account and log in... takes seconds)
    3. Upload (button)
    4. Select Media Files to Share (button)
    5. Choose file
    6. Continue (button)
    7. Choose "This file is my own work"
    8. Add a description and maybe some tags to be nice
    9. Next (button)
    10. Click on the thumbnail of the picture you uploaded
    11. Click on the picture to open in it's own page
    12. Copy the URL from the address bar



    The truth is that my only qualification for doing this is that I'm willing to do it. I could use some help here. By the end of the winter break I'll probably have enough content to make the course worthwhile enough to keep but it could be so much more. I need people from here to share pictures and write content. It's not hard. It's certainly easier than endless complaints about Makers and Photobucket.

    So, how about it? Are you ready to move from "Get off my lawn!" to gettin' off yer butt? This could be something significant, but not if it's just me doing it. I need help.

    David...

    --- original post ---

    So... in exploring WikiMedia as a photo hosting site that allows hotlinking (a success), I started wandering about the WikiVerse. Lots of stuff there, including WikiVersity.

    https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Machining

    I like the idea of it. I want to participate. I'm going to participate. Do you want to participate too?

    I mean, the link above is pretty much blank. It's disappointing... except that's also an opportunity.

    After getting over the first bit of "I can't do that" and realizing that yes, even I can, I've decided I can modify and upload my little blog post on drilling accurate holes. But, why stop there?

    Collectively, we could have the basics of a Home Shop Machining course hashed out before January. There is certainly the expertise here and lot of people seem to like writing. Why waste time complaining about Photobucket when you could upload them to WikiMedia? Why complain about young people calling you names like "maker" when you could teach them what it's really all about? Why not build something that will last for generations? It's cold and not all of us have heated shops. Family is over so it's a good time to hide. Why not just do it?

    As a platform, WikiVersity is completely open to the idea that this is the place where idea get hashed out and built up. They want content and it doesn't have to be perfect. Just start something and it might grow. It's a Wiki, yes, and that does take some getting used to. Having someone come along and edit what you just wrote is a bit weird at first, but after a while it becomes easy... somebody will come along and fix it, so don't worry. Just write, upload some pictures, contribute.

    So, I've created this:
    https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home_Shop_Machining

    And, started in on the next level down but discovered a "New user page creation limit." Apparently, I'm a little too enthusiastic for a newbee.

    But, that won't stop you. Go ahead, edit my page. Create a new page. Be bold, as they say (just not quick at the start). Or, not. I'll eventually get my Accurate Hole Drilling page in there. Maybe the project will die at that point, or maybe it won't. It's up to you. But... do you really want me (ME?) to create an entire course on home shop machining? You KNOW you could do better. Just do it.

    David...
    Last edited by fixerdave; 01-01-2018, 12:34 AM. Reason: making the first post relevant
    http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

  • #2
    YouTube is full of videos on machining and making things--From setup to completion. Some you have to take with a grain of salt but in general, I find many that are helpful. Many of the "hobby leaders" making videos are sure to be more accurate than any Wiki page. And I don't care to nagged for donations. I don't use it very often. But knock yourself out! Can't have too much machine porn.

    Comment


    • #3
      Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
      YouTube is full of videos on machining and making things--From setup to completion...
      Agreed that YouTube is a great place to learn. But, if you want to contribute, you can either upload a video or make a snide comment about one that's already there. There's not a lot of options in between. With a Wiki, you can make and upload a video, write some text, organise what's already there, fix a spelling mistake, add a heading for stuff you think should be there but don't want to bother adding, discuss possible changes, etc.. In other words, you can collaborate with a Wiki. A YouTube video is made and shared; a Wiki is planted and (hopefully) grows.

      Admittedly, it's not for everyone. Lots of people seem to take a great deal of ownership with stuff like this, even stuff they've given away and have no ideas about earning an income from. You don't own Wiki content. It's more like a kid... you start it, maybe try to guide it, but you never really know how it's going to turn out.

      David...
      Last edited by fixerdave; 12-21-2017, 02:38 AM.
      http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

      Comment


      • #4
        Well, the first bit of content is in the new "Course" on Home Shop Machining.

        https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home...Accurate_Holes

        I'm going to keep plugging away at this over the winter break. Feel free to join in.

        If not, well, don't be complaining that all those "Makers" think 3in1 Chinese equipment is what people mean by 'Lathe', 'Mill', or 'Drill' and that everything they know is wrong. You have the opportunity to fix that now. It's up to you. You can even edit pages without an account or logging in. It's a wiki.

        If you don't want to edit anything, I would appreciate if any of you could at least go through your pictures to see if there's any you are willing to share. Pictures of layout tools, by themselves and in use, equipment, examples of smaller and larger lathes, various attachments, cutters and bits, etc.. Any pictures you actually took and thus fully own the copyrights to. Please upload them to MediaWiki and provide the link. As the owner, you have to upload them to MediaWiki... I can't do that for you. But, if I know they're there, I can use them in the Home Shop Machining course.

        Here's the instructions for uploading (works well for hotlinking pictures in these forums as well):
        1. Go here: https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page
        2. Log in (or create and account and log in... takes seconds)
        3. Upload (button)
        4. Select Media Files to Share (button)
        5. Choose file
        6. Continue (button)
        7. Choose "This file is my own work"
        8. Add a description and maybe some tags to be nice
        9. Next (button)
        10. Click on the thumbnail of the picture you uploaded
        11. Click on the picture to open in it's own page
        12. Copy the URL from the address bar


        Then, paste that address into this thread. I'll use them as appropriate. Or, go ahead and put them in the course yourself. It's a wiki. That's what it's all about.

        David...
        http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

        Comment


        • #5
          awesome idea. I'm still a rookie, so can't really contribute content yet.

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by gambler View Post
            awesome idea. I'm still a rookie, so can't really contribute content yet.
            Sure you can.

            Take pictures of you lathe bits or whatever and upload them to MediaWiki. If you want to keep going, put them on a page with a short description of each and where it might be used. You'll learn a lot by the time your finished. Teaching someone else is the fastest way to learn.

            David...
            http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

            Comment


            • #7
              Here's the next page:
              https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home...pment/Bandsaws

              Here's what I said:

              Metal Cutting Bandsaws[edit]
              They come in multiple styles but, for the Home Shop Machinist, there are three common types:

              Horizontal/Vertical Offset[edit]

              Metal cutting bandsaw (02)
              The blade is twisted where it cuts such that stock longer than the distance between the blade and the frame can be cut. The amount of offset determines how thick of material can be cut. The distance between the bearings that support the twisted segment of blade determines how wide a material can be cut. A common Home Workshop horizontal/vertical metal cutting bandsaw would be 4"x 6", thus limited to 4 inches wide, 6 inches thick, at any practical length.

              These saws can typically be used horizontally, thus allowing stock to be cut to length unattended, or vertically, often with an auxiliary table.

              Vertical Bandsaw[edit]
              These are very similar to typical wood bandsaws, though they tend to run slower for more efficient metal cutting and some come equipped with integral band welders. The band welders allow the blade to be cut, threaded through a hole in the work, and then welded back together, thus allowing cutting out of interior features.

              Handheld Offset Bandsaw[edit]
              These operate in much the same way as the larger horizontal/vertical offset bandsaws but are smaller and sometimes battery powered.


              If you don't like what I said or just think you could say it better, go to the page and hit that [edit] link. You don't even need an account; no logon required. Go ahead, do it!

              If you have a picture of one of those handheld bandsaws, upload it to MediaWiki and put the link here. Or, any other pictures for that matter. I'll put it in, or better yet just put it in yourself. It's a wiki.

              David...
              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

              Comment


              • #8
                Here's another page... Yeah, I'll admit I'm just putting it here to bump the topic back up. I've not yet given up on getting help for this project. Besides, if I can get you eye-rolling enough at my lame content, I might just get you to go there and fix it. Have you gone there yet? Fixed anything? It's going to be pretty sad if you don't. Think of the little Makers and the horrible things they're learning.

                David...

                A Good File is a Wonderful Thing[edit]
                There are a great many treatise on files available and not worth repeating here.

                What an aspiring Home Shop Machinist needs to know is this:[edit]
                Files come in single or double cut. Single for finish, double for stock removal.
                They come in 'Fine' and 'Bastard', where the latter means a rougher tooth pattern.
                They come in a great many shapes and sizes, useful for different tasks.
                Larger sizes generally have relatively rougher tooth patterns.
                Some files have 'Safe Edges', which means the edge does not have teeth. They are useful when filing up to an edge.
                There is such a thing as a 'Lathe File' with teeth designed to cut better on the outside of circular work.

                A Home Shop Machinist uses files to:[edit]
                Quickly shape a piece of metal. If there is not too much metal to remove, an experienced machinist can often shape a part faster with a file than it would take to set up a machine, properly secure the part, index it, and then make the cut.
                Improve the finish of a part. Properly used, a file can leave a very nice finish on metal.
                Improve the fit of a part. When high tolerances are required, it is common practice to leave a slight amount of material while lathing a part and then creep up on the final size with a file.
                Enlarge a hole. Oddly enough, a square file is the best choice to make round holes larger.
                http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                Comment


                • #9
                  Yeah, more content. Not intended to be complete. Go ahead and add your favorite. It's easy.
                  ... oh, to avoid arguments, I figure the lists should be alphabetical

                  https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home_Shop_Machining/CAD

                  Computer Aided Design[edit]

                  CAD systems are 2 dimensional, much like traditional drafting, or 3 dimensional modelling systems. With 3D, there are 2 approaches: parametric, in that work is started as a 2D sketch that is "defined" and then processed into 3D forms, or direct modelling, where 3D objects are manipulated. There is some convergence and the lines between these 2 approaches, and even between 2D and 3D, are getting blurry.

                  Home Shop Machinists use CAD to:

                  * Make shop drawings to work from.
                  * Model 3D objects to check for fit and function.
                  * Generate code to run CNC machines.
                  * As well, running structural analysis on designs is becoming possible.

                  Common Applications[edit]

                  Free for Hobby Use[edit]
                  * Fusion 360 - From Autodesk, parametric 3D modelling system. Requires online account but does allow some offline editing.
                  * OnShape - Fully web browser based parametric 3D modelling system. Free but models must be public domain.
                  * SketchUp - From Trimble (bought from Google). Very easy to use 3D modelling system. Intuitive inference engine.

                  Also Popular[edit]

                  Expensive but Industry Standard[edit]
                  * AutoCAD
                  * Inventor
                  * SolidWorks


                  Nope... haven't given up yet.
                  http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I support the idea of providing an easy and accessible guide to absolute beginners to the techniques of home shop work.

                    I occasionally decide that I'd like to know about something new to me. I search for some of the associated forums, and look for some starter guides. I rarely find them. I'm not a watch a video kind of person. I just want a couple of pages detailing starter stuff.

                    My latest disappointment was leatherwork. There are some great forums for the experienced, but for the beginner I just could not find any written material for beginners.

                    So even though the plan here is for a fairly comprehensive document, I urge the authors to make sure there is a section on the real starter stuff - what does cross feed mean, how tight do you tighten a chuck, what metals can a lathe handle, what does a horizontal mill mean, what kind of grinders are there and what metals can they be applied to.

                    So, this is a simple lathe, this is a more advanced lathe that has feed, screw cutting etc, and so on.

                    I know it's not easy to put yourself in a newbie's shoes - but it would be a valuable resource for many.
                    Richard

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Originally posted by rohart View Post
                      I support the idea of providing an easy and accessible guide to absolute beginners to the techniques of home shop work.... I urge the authors to make ... I know it's not easy to put yourself in a newbie's shoes - but it would be a valuable resource for many.
                      I agree on all counts, except YOU are just as much the author as anyone else. This is a WIKI and encouragement = participation. Don't urge, do!

                      Look... it's all great to say you hope someone will write a book for free but that's not going to happen. Why would it? What can happen, what wiki's make possible, is for a whole bunch of people to each do a tiny little bit. Eventually, collectively, you end up with something that's a valuable resource. Imagine even 10% of the tips, trick, and methods of work written in this forum... indexed, ordered, cross-referenced.

                      I get it that the concept of a wiki is a bit strange to some people... it is a bit weird. But, the fundamental points are:
                      • It's EASY
                      • You don't even need to make an account
                      • Just go to a page, hit edit, and start typing
                      • You don't have to create a masterpiece
                      • You don't have to finish what you've started
                      • Anything, ANYTHING you can contribute is usefull
                      • Did I mention it was easy?


                      For example, you want a diagram of a lathe showing the names of parts. Well, do you have one? No? Neither do I. That's a problem. So, solve it. Draw one, do it on a napkin if you want, label the parts, then take a picture and upload it (as described above). Somebody else can come along and write a sentence that says "Cross Slide: .... ". If enough people do something, anything, then soon enough there will be a diagram with all the parts fully described. Then... THEN maybe somebody will replace your napkin diagram with something better. Somebody will fix the spelling mistakes in the text. Somebody will re-organise the page so it flows better. Somebody will...

                      But, never forget that you're a somebody too.

                      I decided to start this because I agree with you. I'm giving it the winter break to see what happens, another 5 days or so (and then I'll mercifully shut up about this). If I can get it to the point where there's enough content to not warrant deletion then I'll have done my part. But, if somebody else contributes, it will be twice as good. If 3 people, then 3x, 10 people, then 10x... It could take off. Right now, it's pretty lame and it won't make it much past that if I'm the only one doing it. Yes, it could be a valuable resource... if somebody decides to help.

                      How about you?

                      David...
                      http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Okay, saved you the trouble of drawing something on a napkin:



                        Go here: https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home...nnotated_Lathe
                        hit edit, and start filling in the numbers.

                        It's easy. You can do it. I labelled the work light. Your turn.

                        David...
                        Last edited by fixerdave; 12-27-2017, 12:30 AM. Reason: moved page... hey, even I make mistakes
                        http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          38 Safety shield. Discarded once lathe has been installed.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Might need a bit more than 5 days as some people will have entertaining social lives, not be stuck in front of a nice fire with only the radio for company like me.
                            Added a few bits anyway.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Baz View Post
                              Might need a bit more than 5 days as some people will have entertaining social lives, not be stuck in front of a nice fire with only the radio for company like me.
                              Added a few bits anyway.
                              I, for one, appreciate the hobby of home shop machining precisely because it helps me avoid having an entertaining social life

                              And, thank you for the edits. 2 people, a little bit of time, and there's an annotated diagram of a lathe nearly complete for anyone to use. Anyone else want to step up and finish it?
                              As an aside, that "anyone to use" is the important part. There are lots of annotated lathe diagrams, but people own them so we can't use them. Now, there's one we, and anyone else, can use without having to worry about copyright. The same goes for pictures. There are lots of pictures of everything imaginable about machining, but they have to be expressly released with a copyright allowing at least some rights for us to use them. That's why the CreativeCommons copyright agreement exists. So, go through your collection of photos and upload them to https://commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/Main_Page. Go ahead, declare them part of the CreativeCommons and they'll get used in the Home Shop Machining textbook.

                              Oh, and thank you Baz. The info on drill bits is perfect... exactly what we need. I linked the title to the wikipedia entry on drill bits which describes all the geometry and stuff, but your write up is on how to use them... something missing from wikipedia.

                              BTW, I've created a project page... go ahead everyone, show off your work.
                              https://en.wikiversity.org/wiki/Home...ining/Projects

                              The more the better,

                              David...
                              Last edited by fixerdave; 12-27-2017, 11:06 PM.
                              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

                              Comment

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