Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

She flies again!

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • She flies again!

    9 years ago I broke my back & had surgery in Jan & a Tornado destoyed my hanger in April. Here's my 1938 Taylor-Young before the tornado, click on the pics to enlarge http://gallery.taylorcraft.org/main.php?g2_itemId=2985

    It's now flying again & I'm so happy http://www.avioesantigos.com.br/en/p...-wa0009-36897/

    A few more '39 Tcrafts https://www.eaa.org/en/eaa-museum/mu...-wing---n21292

    Licensed to England as Austers https://www.revolvy.com/main/index.p...tem_type=topic

    2 brothers fly non stop for over 2 weeks in a Tcraft http://sangamoncountyhistory.org/wp/?p=4912

    Set a light flotplane record from New Youk to Miami non stop http://www.worldcat.org/title/50-hor.../oclc/74283077

    An Auster (Taylorcraft) was the 1st Israel 3 day war, one guy flying, one guy dropping grenades out the window. The did a set of coins of all the planes & the Tcraft was the 1st one. Those were the days when IFR meant I follow railroads, compasses & brakes were options, no starter, no lights or any electrical, no wing tanks, just pure flying!
    "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
    world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
    country, in easy stages."
    ~ James Madison

  • #2
    Happy for you!
    "A machinist's (WHAP!) best friend (WHAP! WHAP!) is his hammer. (WHAP!)" - Fred Tanner, foreman, Lunenburg Foundry and Engineering machine shop, circa 1979

    Comment


    • #3
      It's always nice to see a good friend back in action.
      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

      Comment


      • #4
        So that's the one! Beautiful plane...

        I was 17 and the guy was asking $1100 for an all aluminum Taylorcraft with 20 hrs. on a major. But he needed the cash and I didn't have half that much. It was sucked up a week later....

        They fly beautifully and simply. Pure joy to me!

        Pete
        1973 SB 10K .
        BenchMaster mill.

        Comment


        • #5
          Ouch, did you pancake the gear and break your back? What happened?

          Comment


          • #6
            Nice plane! Wish I had one.
            Paul A.

            Make it fit.
            You can't win and there is a penalty for trying!

            Comment


            • #7
              Broke my back(blew out 3 ext disc & 1 internal disc)n't lifting a tree the power co agreed not to cut a huge oak & maple from the 1800 when the house was built. broke it in Sept had surgery in Jan. Bought the cities 64x 96x20 Queen Air hanger in Sept after leasing it for 5 years, was laid up so hired it remodeled & a tornado took it down April 5th. Look at the pics it wasn't crashed & was on the gear.
              "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
              world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
              country, in easy stages."
              ~ James Madison

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by flylo View Post
                Broke my back(blew out 3 ext disc & 1 internal disc)n't lifting a tree the power co agreed not to cut a huge oak & maple from the 1800 when the house was built. broke it in Sept had surgery in Jan. Bought the cities 64x 96x20 Queen Air hanger in Sept after leasing it for 5 years, was laid up so hired it remodeled & a tornado took it down April 5th. Look at the pics it wasn't crashed & was on the gear.
                Yikes, breaking your back from a pancake would have been far less foolish.

                Comment


                • #9
                  I wouldn't call it foolish, I was in the best shape of my life at 49 I was 6'4" 240# could bench 400# leg press 650# & ride a century most any day I chose. Never needed a doctor, no back issues, no stenosis, just slipped or stepped in a hole I don't know but I felt it went inside & waited 2 months to see a back surgeon. Always said I wanted to retire at 50 but not that way. Was layed up for a year & had to relearn how to walk. So while I was relearning I bought a Bonanza, an easy plane to fly. Read the Taylorcraft story by Chet Peek if you get a chance as Taylor made the Cub long before he partnered with Piper & the hold back then were suitable small engines & they tried one called a Tiger Cub so that's where the Cub came from.
                  1938 Taylor-Young
                  Model BL NC20426
                  "Life's great in my '38"
                  & Taylorcoupe N2806W
                  "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                  world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                  country, in easy stages."
                  ~ James Madison

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Hey Flylo,

                    Do have the opportunity to be in contact with the fellows that bought the plane? Any chance for you to ever fly in it or ride in it? It looks like from the pic's, that they did a complete teardown to the frame restoration. It came out beautifully. Is the hanger in the before pic the one you have full of machinery? We really need to have a picture visit inside if it is that big and full, all I can say is WOW !
                    Hope your doing better on the back issue side of things. Happy Holidays to all !


                    TX
                    Mr fixit for the family
                    Chris

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      I’ve flown three airplanes that people since have crashed and killed themselves in. Common theme is VFR flight into weather, and not looking out the damn window for traffic. C172’s have a design such that if you crash into the ground, you usually get chopped in half at the waist. A friend of mine mid aired a Seminole into a 172, and the best we can think, he had time to think about his soon to be death. He wasn’t alone, three others got the same experience. Just wondering if any other pilots here have similar experiences?

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mr Fixit View Post
                        Hey Flylo,

                        Do have the opportunity to be in contact with the fellows that bought the plane? Any chance for you to ever fly in it or ride in it? It looks like from the pic's, that they did a complete teardown to the frame restoration. It came out beautifully. Is the hanger in the before pic the one you have full of machinery? We really need to have a picture visit inside if it is that big and full, all I can say is WOW !
                        Hope your doing better on the back issue side of things. Happy Holidays to all !


                        TX
                        Mr fixit for the family
                        Chris
                        No Sir, it's in Brazil & I can't get into one anymore so I have 2 ultralights & a powered parachute which I can take on vacation. I had several Tcrafts, learned to fly on skies in a 1940 but the '38 was restored to like new condition. Was delivered on Christmas eve 1938 to Kellog airport, 35 miles from me. Sold in '41 to a guy in Oklahoma why hung it in a barn & didn't comeback from WW2. It hung for 50 years until a guy in TX found it & restored it for his dad. I bought it in Angier N.C. & flew her home. I'm so glad she's flying again. John Glenn learned to fly in the same make & model. Thanks all & Merry Christmas!
                        Last edited by flylo; 12-23-2017, 07:47 PM.
                        "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                        world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                        country, in easy stages."
                        ~ James Madison

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RB211 View Post
                          Just wondering if any other pilots here have similar experiences?
                          Fortunately not yet for me. I got my PPL/IR about 15 years ago and the planes from my flight school and the 172 I co-owned are all right where I left them. Took it back up again this past summer and after finishing my BFR I went straight on to an IPC. In this part of the country it’s hard to get anywhere most of the year without an instrument rating. Even with it I approach any sort of weather very conservatively, I’m still pretty low time and a Cherokee or Skyhawk isn’t made to punch through serious wx.

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            If I ever had to crash I'd take a rag & tube plane with a steel tube frame .over an aluminum plane like a Cessna or even my Bonanza. Closest I got to buying the farm was in wind shear behind a thunderstorm. I was flying 1000' AGL, just filled the tanks when it was like a giant hank slammed me straight down in a second or so. Lost most all the fuel, had no control at all but just above the trees about 100' the controls started working again. Ever been outside on a calm day when a gust of wing comes up the stops? There's been wind shear nearby. I've done a lot of things some people think are dangerous but all calculated risks & I've always believed when your number up it your time to go but you can ugly yourself up & things can happen. So go have fun but use common sense.
                            "Let me recommend the best medicine in the
                            world: a long journey, at a mild season, through a pleasant
                            country, in easy stages."
                            ~ James Madison

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              My little brother has a 70 year old Luscombe that is a kick to fly in. He has over 3000 hours piloting various aircraft, but loves his Luscombe the most.

                              I've had some crazy times flying with him.

                              Dan L
                              “All political power comes from the barrel of a gun. The communist party must command all the guns, that way, no guns can ever be used to command the party.” (Problems of War and Strategy, Nov 6 1938, published in “Selected Works of Mao Zedong,” 1965)

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X