Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Phenolic Bar

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Phenolic Bar

    In Peter Stenabaugh's latest article, he uses a phenolic bar (pg 14-15,picture 5, July/August issue) to run true his spacer ring. Any recommendations on where to purchase such an item. Do I need to shape the bar? More information on this device would be very helpful. Thank You.

  • #2
    I am not familiar with the article you are looking at, or what you are trying to make. "Garolite" is a phenolic bar. It is a phenolic resin bonded to paper or fabric. It is availiable form Mc-Master-Carr. May be what you are looking for.
    Paying Attention Is Not That Expensive.

    Comment


    • #3
      Be careful about that phenolic. I had to make some bushings out of that stuff one time and it turned out that I was highly allergic to it. It was like turning poison ivy. I itched mightly and refused to work with it anymore. We used something else to do the job. Use a particle mask and wear gloves. And don't sweat (it gets in the pores).
      Richard Montgomery
      Robert, LA

      Comment


      • #4
        There is a lot of formaldehyde in phenolic. Most likely that was what caused the reaction.

        [This message has been edited by JPR (edited 08-20-2004).]
        John

        Comment


        • #5
          I liked the idea too (didn't have phonolic) and tried a piece of HDPE plastic with good results. About $12.00 for 1 ft square x 1" from www.mcmaster.com. Tough slick white plastic used as kitchen cutting boards. Good for zero clearance table saw inserts too.

          Comment


          • #6
            Phenolic resins are the reaction product of phenol or phenolic like compounds with formaldehyde. There is usually a small amount of unreacted formaldehyde present in the finished product. Also, when phenolic resins are heated to the decomposition temperature they will revert back to their original reactants and being that formaldehyde is a gas it will vaporise and allow you to breath the vapor. The heat generated when machining may be enough to cause the thermal decomposition, and the release of the formaldehyde. Formaldehyde is presently on the dung-roster as far as toxic/nasty chemicals, so avoid breathing the fumes (carcinogenic also). This ends todays chemistry class.

            Chris

            Comment


            • #7
              I make some parts for a manufacture we work for out of phenolic. It dulls your endmills like crazy, it is better to use carbide on it if you can afford it. I also use a shop vac with a Hepa filter and a dust mask when machining it. Make sure you wipe the machine down real well after machining it also, the dust settles everywhere and just sucks the oil right up and im sure if it tears up my cutters its probally not good for the ways.

              Comment


              • #8
                I just got a prototype job to do with a sheet of the stuff. Thanks to this board, at least I now know what I'm in for and what precautions to take. We'll see how it goes.
                ----------
                Try to make a living, not a killing. -- Utah Phillips
                Don't believe everything you know. -- Bumper sticker
                Everybody is ignorant, only on different subjects. -- Will Rogers
                There are lots of people who mistake their imagination for their memory. - Josh Billings
                Law of Logical Argument - Anything is possible if you don't know what you are talking about.
                Don't own anything you have to feed or paint. - Hood River Blackie

                Comment


                • #9
                  Acetal (Delrin) is also made from formaldehyde. It doesn't normally become hot enough during machining to pose a problem but beware if you are especially sensitive to formaldehyde.
                  Free software for calculating bolt circles and similar: Click Here

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I did some heavy machining on phoenelic one time.
                    I was making 20 inch gear blanks.
                    The chips from the drill (about 2" dia) liked to smoulder in the chip pan.
                    I didn't have coolant on the lathe. Finger prints are also a problem.
                    Kap

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      All things plastic and different grades of the pheonlic bars

                      http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/default.asp
                      all different grades of it and plastics along with a lot of info what thge stuff is good for.
                      Glen
                      Been there, probably broke it, doing that!
                      I am not a lawyer, and never played one on TV!
                      All the usual and standard disclaimers apply. Do not try this at home, use only as directed, No warranties express or implied, for the intended use or the suggested uses, Wear safety glasses, closed course, professionals only

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        Ditto what everyone else has said: Keep your nose away from this stuff, especially if it gets hot enough to smoke!

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          The material is also known as "TUFNOL"


                          if it's any help in your search.

                          all the best.mark

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            Fiberon is the name of one manufacture. They make this stuff for the electrical industry and they also impregnate very thin sheets of exotic woods and press them together for a very dense and durable knife handle material that needs no finish, just a buffing.

                            It is highly toxic. Knife makers I know work with it with a fan moving the super fine dust. As someone mentioned, formaldehyde is the culprit. My two favorites are Linen micarta and black ebony.
                            - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - - -
                            Thank you to our families of soldiers, many of whom have given so much more then the rest of us for the Freedom we enjoy.

                            It is true, there is nothing free about freedom, don't be so quick to give it away.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Gee, I guess I must either be numb from too many years of solvent inhalation or just not sensitive to the stuff. Guess I'll want to be more careful in the future. I made a nice little batch of hammer handles with it a few weeks ago, and they turned out so well, I'm planning more of 'em:



                              Here's the rest of the story:

                              http://www.frets.com/FRETSPages/Mach...ofhammers.html

                              Anybody have a source for phenolic rod that's significantly less pricey than McMaster?
                              Cheers,

                              Frank Ford
                              HomeShopTech

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X