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Need a decent Boring head for small vertical mill

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  • Need a decent Boring head for small vertical mill

    I have a Clausing 8520 vertical mill with a MT2 spindle. I purchased one of those cheap Chinese Criterion style boring heads with the cheesy brazed carbide tooling. No surprise that is was less than acceptable. I would like to request advise on what to get that isn't too much for the mill and reasonably priced. I do have a 1.5hp motor with a VFD and it works very well. I have noticed a nice Wohlhaupter on Ebay (https://www.ebay.com/itm/WOHLHAUPTER...53.m1438.l2649). This is a little rich for me but not out of the question. What other boring head brands and models that would be appropriate for my machine? I would also like to use boring bars that would accept carbide inserts (CCMT/CCMG) or others.
    Thanks

    Skipd1

  • #2
    That one is a boring and facing head. It will add more capability than just a boring head. Other than just boring a hole, it can make a circular flat surface, the same as facing on a lathe. This feature can be used to cut snap ring or O ring grooves, make an undercut in a hole, back spotface, etc. For just a regular boring head, look for a used Criterion or Erikson Tenthset. The Erikson is marked in 1/10 increments.

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    • #3
      Did you try sharpening those cheesy brazed carbide boring bars? Mine seem to cut much better after I hit them with a hand held diamond block. They might do better yet if I had a finer diamond.

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      • #4
        My cheesy brazed carbide boring bars work very well after they have had the correct geometry imparted with a bench grinder green wheel.

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        • #5
          I too have had decent success using the cheap brazed carbide boring bars. But like mentioned, you need to dress them up abit and make sure they are set correctly in the tool holder. You might try using HSS and grind your own tool bits. Your mill isn't the most rigid and would probably produce better results with positive rake, very sharp tools. Just a suggestion.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by nc5a View Post
            I too have had decent success using the cheap brazed carbide boring bars. But like mentioned, you need to dress them up abit and make sure they are set correctly in the tool holder. You might try using HSS and grind your own tool bits. Your mill isn't the most rigid and would probably produce better results with positive rake, very sharp tools. Just a suggestion.
            I strongly second the above suggestion. I have 3 of the cheaper sort of boring heads in various sizes and to get really good results I usually end up using hss tool bits. For the general run of work where the last few thous, and or the surface finish are not vitally important resharpened cheap carbide boring bars work well for me. Also beware some boring heads show one thous of advance on the dial being one thous ON THE DIAMETER, and some others show one thous advance on the dial being the amount the tool moves, thus it takes TWO on the diameter. Hope this helps. David Powell.

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            • #7
              Yes i did with a 1500 grit diamond disk, but may not have created the correct geometry. I'll have to check it.

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              • #8
                Thanks everyone for the great advise. I will explore better cutting tools for the one I have before I spend $400 on another.

                Skipd1

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                • #9
                  There was a good article on making a boring and facing head in the mag a few issues ago.
                  .

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                  • #10
                    If the boring head does not wobble or wiggle when inserted in the mill, look at the boring bars. 1) are they sharp? 2) are they the correct geometry 3) are they in correct orientation 4) is the bar rigid enough for the depth of cut you wish to make.

                    Some people leave the dovetail clamping screws just barely tight so they can move the feed screw without messing with the dovetail screws. I tighten the dovetail clamping screws every cut. Also the correct speed and feed makes a difference. Think of a boring operation on the mill as lathe turned up on end and the tool spinning instead of the part.

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                    • #11
                      A basic boring bar is really very low tech. If it mates in the spindle properly and the boring bars fit in the head properly and if the lock screws lock the head , then you are 90% there. Even the sliding surfaces don't have to be perfect. I had to settle for a cheap import years ago and it's done the job every time I've used it.

                      Dan
                      At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and extra parts.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by skipd1 View Post
                        Yes i did with a 1500 grit diamond disk, but may not have created the correct geometry. I'll have to check it.
                        A 1500 grit disk would be a finishing disk. You probably need to start with something much coarser to bring the edge into the proper shape, then move to the 1500. I use a hand held diamond sharpener. It takes a bit to get the right geometry even with that and it is much coarser than your disk.

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                        • #13
                          I tried to help a guy bore some holes Sith a cheap boring head, the holes were different sizes.
                          If you can hold it in your hand bring a piece of bar to check ... knocking off some high or tight spots with sandpaper around a rod makes you wonder if it was worth the price.
                          I think mine us a BIG brand, from Japan.. bet I used it a thousand times., worth every cent I paid..

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                          • #14
                            The boring head is pretty simple. As long as the scale reads correctly it should work for you. Try buying high quality boring bars instead of cheap ones. It'll be the best buy for your money. I use Micro 100 for carbide, and have a few HSS holders I use for aluminum.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Forestgnome View Post
                              The boring head is pretty simple. As long as the scale reads correctly it should work for you. Try buying high quality boring bars instead of cheap ones. It'll be the best buy for your money. I use Micro 100 for carbide, and have a few HSS holders I use for aluminum.
                              The high quality boring bars may be what he ends up with but he already has the cheesy ones and some of us have been able to make them work fine for just a bit of time sharpening them and getting them properly oriented. Unless he is in a real hurry or is going into big time production his cost to use what he already has is pretty low.

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