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  • Annealing aluminum

    Does anybody know what aluminum alloy roof vallley flashing is made of?
    It probably doesn't really matter but I would like to know how high a temp.
    to completely anneal it. Want to use it as soft as possible to cushion the knurl
    on handles in the lathe chuck while turning the other ends. Don't want to
    end up with a puddle of aluminum in the furnace. :-)
    Thanks.
    ...lew...

  • #2
    Not a great deal of science in it, but I was taught to draw a line on the aluminium with a bar of soap, then heat until the soap line turns brown. It has always worked for me.

    George

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    • #3
      Originally posted by Georgineer View Post
      Not a great deal of science in it, but I was taught to draw a line on the aluminium with a bar of soap, then heat until the soap line turns brown. It has always worked for me.

      George
      :-) Our heat treat oven doesn't have a window. :-) It does have a good thermometer though. :-)
      ...lew...

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      • #4
        The classic trick for guys using sheet aluminum to form bodywork is to use an acetylene-rich torch flame to coat the part with soot, then reset the torch to a neutral flame and carefully heat the part 'til the soot is burned off.

        Doc.
        Doc's Machine. (Probably not what you expect.)

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        • #5
          If the handles are steel, you're probably worrying over nothing; the aluminum will be much, much softer.

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          • #6
            Yeah just scribble around on it with soap......heat till Brown or black, cool off.
            i use Vice grips or pliers and a propane torch. .works great.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
              :-) Our heat treat oven doesn't have a window. :-) It does have a good thermometer though. :-)
              ...lew...
              Maybe the temp where carbon starts to burn? 300C

              I was taught, hot enough when wood starts to scorch then quench and you get 20min or so of very nice flex. Saved me a few dirtbike levers, until I learned to keep them loose enough to move when things didn't go as planned.

              Don't think that's going to help in your application though.

              David...
              Last edited by fixerdave; 12-27-2017, 10:13 PM.
              http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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              • #8
                Sharpie marks.
                Hell of a lot cleaner than acetylene smoke and no floaters.
                Just heat 'til they disappear.
                Len

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by adatesman View Post
                  If the handles are steel, you're probably worrying over nothing; the aluminum will be much, much softer.
                  No they are knurled 6061 T6 . Projects at school for the kids. It's a lot easier to do if the knurling is done before the other end is turned down. We have done this before but the material we used is all gone now. Even steel knurled will show the chuck jaws marks if held sufficiently to do any serious turning. The handbook has 1220 F as melting point so I wonder how close I dare get to that. I guess I'll try about 800 or so and see.
                  I'm not going to mess with acetylene soot or soap and torches with a heat treat oven. I just thought someone may have already done this.
                  ...lew...

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Doc Nickel View Post
                    The classic trick for guys using sheet aluminum to form bodywork is to use an acetylene-rich torch flame to coat the part with soot, then reset the torch to a neutral flame and carefully heat the part 'til the soot is burned off.

                    Doc.
                    I was told that same trick by an aircraft metal beater. If it's good enough for aircraft.....

                    Used it a couple of times to anneal and beat back a clutch lever after a dump on the bikes. Never got the urge to try it on any brake levers but it saved me a bunch of money on clutch levers and they were fine. One I straightened and bent again then straightened again and I'm still using it and it's been fine.

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                    • #11
                      Here you go.

                      http://lmgtfy.com/?q=aluminum+annealing+temperature

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                      • #12
                        Why use acetylene when you can use propane..

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                          No they are knurled 6061 T6 . Projects at school for the kids. It's a lot easier to do if the knurling is done before the other end is turned down. We have done this before but the material we used is all gone now. Even steel knurled will show the chuck jaws marks if held sufficiently to do any serious turning. The handbook has 1220 F as melting point so I wonder how close I dare get to that. I guess I'll try about 800 or so and see.
                          I'm not going to mess with acetylene soot or soap and torches with a heat treat oven. I just thought someone may have already done this.
                          ...lew...

                          Sounds like you have your process out of kilter then, if you're chucking on a knurled diameter for a subsequent operation.

                          YMMV
                          Last edited by adatesman; 12-28-2017, 01:33 AM.

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                          • #14
                            I have bought Al flashing at Lowes before. Be careful as some brands have a coating like plastic or some kind of clear paint on it.
                            Sole proprietor of Acme Buggy Whips Ltd.
                            Specialty products for beating dead horses.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by Beazld View Post
                              I have bought Al flashing at Lowes before. Be careful as some brands have a coating like plastic or some kind of clear paint on it.
                              WOW I'll check that. That is where I got it. Wonder what will happen to that coating when it get up to temp. :-) Make a mess for sure.
                              ...lew...

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