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Old sawmill arbor

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  • #16
    Originally posted by flylo View Post
    Here's an old video of one http://www.mobilemfg.com/portable-saw-videos.html showing the block & board method no one has used for years. I'd never have a band mill, these have 3 blades & the log stays in one place while the saw cuts & brings the board right back to you. You can cut a 2x4 this pas & a 1x8 the next, all you do is guide it onto the pile. Jim May designed it to replace helicopter logging instead of hauling the logs out you could cut & sticker the lumber & haul out 60% less weight. Most lodges in remote Canada are built wit these as the longest pc is 10' & the heaviest part in the engine about 200# & can be brought in by float or ski plane. My hanger & shop are all northern Hemlock I cut.
    That's pretty slick. Looks to be a lot easier to transport than the new bandsaw mills.

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    • #17
      Originally posted by Anvils View Post

      Abner, I think my mill started life as a belsaw but the only thing still belsaw is part of the carriage. The frame is 1/4 x 6" channel. The arbor is 1 1/2 " dia with heavy pillow block roller bearings on each end adjustable for side to side adjustment. The old farmer I bought the mill from said he could cut a 20 ft log but I measure the track at 38 ft. There is a second part under the center of the frame ( husk ?) that is also 1/4 X 6 channel with an axle mount on it. No axle came with the mill and I don't plan on moving it after it is set up. I didn't want a Belsaw but the frame sold me,
      Plus all the extra blades and stuff that came with it. You might google Pacific/Hoe in Portland, Or. They still make saw teeth and circular saw blades. I have their web address some where.
      It been years ago that I remember Pacific/hoe was closed. A little internet sleuthing it looks like they were bought by Simonds in 2010 and have an office at the old hoe building on Tacoma. I will give them a call. Mine came with a 36", 42" and 48" blades but the 42" was what I used. Cut a lot of lumber with it. I built a 48' base.

      So your track is 38'. To cut a 20' you will need to overhang the log on each end, it can be done. 20' is a lot of log. I cut a 16' and 24" at my max. Squaring it up at 16". Flipping a 16" square cant with a peavy and a 'half moon' log turner was difficult. Hopefully you have some supporting equipment.

      I have an old RH hoe circle sawmill trouble shooting guide which is a must have in my book. If you want a copy let me know. Wlks you through proper set up and critical adjustments.

      Be careful running that mill.

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      • #18
        Originally posted by flylo View Post
        Here's an old video of one http://www.mobilemfg.com/portable-saw-videos.html showing the block & board method no one has used for years. I'd never have a band mill, these have 3 blades & the log stays in one place while the saw cuts & brings the board right back to you. You can cut a 2x4 this pas & a 1x8 the next, all you do is guide it onto the pile. Jim May designed it to replace helicopter logging instead of hauling the logs out you could cut & sticker the lumber & haul out 60% less weight. Most lodges in remote Canada are built wit these as the longest pc is 10' & the heaviest part in the engine about 200# & can be brought in by float or ski plane. My hanger & shop are all northern Hemlock I cut.
        My Uncle and I owned one of those for a number of years,made lots of good lumber with it.It was our go to machine for cutting Long Leaf Pine,much better production in that species than a band mill.
        I just need one more tool,just one!

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        • #19
          Abner, Thanks for the offer, I have the following from Pacific/Hoe, Trouble shooting in the Circular sawmill, Bits & shanks- Chisel tooth saws, and
          Big saws (solid and inserted tooth cut-off saws. If you want copies of any, email me at [email protected]

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          • #20
            Originally posted by wierdscience View Post
            My Uncle and I owned one of those for a number of years,made lots of good lumber with it.It was our go to machine for cutting Long Leaf Pine,much better production in that species than a band mill.
            It the best I've seen & I don't know if you ran carbide teeth but they made a big difference. With band mills you have to powerwash or debark the log, turn the log to make the cant to cut in to slabs you have to resaw to the right size. With a 3 bladed dimension mill all you do is dog the log down once & every time the saw comes back you can turn 2 handles & change to a different size board, it cuts it & when you hit the return lever a dog drops down & returns the board & you just guide it to the pile where you've already placed stickers for drying & you're done. If I hadn't had a rain day I'd ave made 20,000 bf the 1st week & it was pure fun. I bet I had 50+ people stop to see it that week so that cust production also. Cut everything I wanted, sold it at a profit but really miss doing it. And as you know with the top edger blade every board was perfect. Jim May had a great idea 55 years ago.

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