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  • Silver solder flux

    Some time back in the dark ages "before I wrote things down" I obtained some flux for silver solder it is a dark brown color and is a water base, at least water will activate it when it gets a little dry. Well I am almost out and would like to get another small supply. I remember it was used for putting carbide teeth on saw blades but my search has turned up nothing.
    Any help would be apprecated

  • #2
    Silver "braze" probably if you use it for carbide teeth?

    I have no idea what you have available on that side of pond but here is one:
    https://www.mcmaster.com/#brazing-flux/=1b10cb7

    I use Johnson&Matthew Easy-flo and it works superb easily on carbide and 55% silver braze.
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      This is where I've been buying silver brazing material:

      http://www.carbideprocessors.com/pag...g-carbide.html

      I've linked to the page on brazing carbides 'cause that's a great source to identify the alloy and flux for carbides.

      These guys started out with an alloy and flux that would work on saw teeth when none other would, so I think they know something about the subject.

      Pete
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        There are several types or grades of silver brazing alloy, it isn't solder as we know it. It is very important to get the matching flux for the brazing alloy you use other wise you may have trouble getting a good joint, the proper flux goes fluid at the right temp. for the specific alloy. You should contact a supplier if in doubt. I have brazed carbide onto steel shanks using Easy-flo 45 (yes in Canada we can still get the cadmium laced "good" alloy) using Handy and Harmman Handy flux, which is the recommended flux here. There are other brands that will work. If you use cadmium free alloy then you will probably need a different flux, they are readily available from suppliers.

        The colour of the flux probably dosen't matter it is brand specific.

        Most fluxes are dry or dry out and can be mixed with water but it isn't necessary because it liquefies at the proper temp. Adding water just makes it easier to apply.
        The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

        Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

        Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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        • #5
          Rolland, it's probably this: http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/e...lack-Flux.aspx

          Although its called 'black', the color is really just a dark brown. Looks and feels like mud, and is readily water soluble (until you use it, after heating/melting it can be a bear to clean up). It works really well.
          Southwest Utah

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          • #6
            Originally posted by chipmaker4130 View Post
            Rolland, it's probably this: http://www.harrisproductsgroup.com/e...lack-Flux.aspx

            Although its called 'black', the color is really just a dark brown. Looks and feels like mud, and is readily water soluble (until you use it, after heating/melting it can be a bear to clean up). It works really well.
            Chip
            I believe that is the flux, does look like mud and it can be a bear to clean up. But it flows better than any other one I have used and seals the joint once it melts. I have always gotten good results with this flux that is why I was looking for a bit more.
            Thanks

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            • #7
              I use borax effectively.

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              • #8
                A guy on Practical Machinist uses it for what You said. Got mine from Him.
                mark costello-Low speed steel

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                • #9
                  Black Flux is very hard on your lungs.
                  Do it outside !

                  Rich
                  Green Bay, WI

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                  • #10
                    The PAGE ABOUT FLUX TYPES from MattiJ's post is quite informative.

                    It also explains why the white flux I've always used had to be used with care so the flux didn't burn and make the joint impossible to achieve. A factor that las mostly led me to flux the joint well when cool then lay small cut pieces of the silver solder I use in the flux and then heat the whole thing carefully up until I'm just at a very dull red where the flux is liquid and the solder melts and flows. Otherwise there's a pretty darn narrow working range before the white stuff turns black and cakes up.
                    Chilliwack BC, Canada

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