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  • Coolant For Mister

    I've decided to pull my mister off the shelf after about 15 years. I was grinding some O1 today and had the stock mounted on short parallels under the ends of the O1 and held between to magnetic transfer blocks so I could square it up. I kept running into problems with distortion from heat because the O1 was suspended off the magnetic chuck, but that is the only way I can grind the curse out of it and square it up at the same time.
    So...... I got a cup of cold water and a Q tip and started mopping a little water over the O1. What a difference in finish. It was a reminder of how well coolant works when grinding. So, I'm wondering if anyone can recommend a good product to use in my mister. I'm sure there are some better choices out there now than there was 15 years ago when I last used this thing.

    JL..............

  • #2
    I ordered two mister setups but they haven't made their way to the US yet. In the meantime, I started reviewing coolant options and don't like what I see in soluble oils. The MSDS lists compounds that shouldn't be inhaled in mist form. Perhaps flooding would be ok but you sure don't want to be creating a mist or steam if there's a chance of breathing it. I'm giving consideration to blending my own formula. One that is safer to have around. All you really need in a coolant is distilled water and a surfactant. Anything else added should be to help control mold and/or bacteria in the tank--Something like Borax.

    Keep anything containing any chlorine compound out of the mix. Like tap water. It's bad for steel/iron alloys. And the resultant mix should be on the alkaline side (pH>7 but less than ~pH 10). A non-foaming soap would work as a surfactant. I'm still looking. I hope someone else can provide a better answer.

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    • #3
      For misting and for flood coolant I use Kool mist #77. For misting you mix 4 oz with 1 gallon of water and for flood coolant you can mix it richer.

      https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0...?ie=UTF8&psc=1

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      • #4
        That's one of the worst as far as health concerns.

        I hope you don't mind contracting COPD and liver cancer.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
          That's one of the worst as far as health concerns.

          I hope you don't mind contracting COPD and liver cancer.
          Is it any worse than eating at Taco Bell?

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            I ordered two mister setups but they haven't made their way to the US yet. In the meantime, I started reviewing coolant options and don't like what I see in soluble oils. The MSDS lists compounds that shouldn't be inhaled in mist form. Perhaps flooding would be ok but you sure don't want to be creating a mist or steam if there's a chance of breathing it. I'm giving consideration to blending my own formula. One that is safer to have around. All you really need in a coolant is distilled water and a surfactant. Anything else added should be to help control mold and/or bacteria in the tank--Something like Borax.

            Keep anything containing any chlorine compound out of the mix. Like tap water. It's bad for steel/iron alloys. And the resultant mix should be on the alkaline side (pH>7 but less than ~pH 10). A non-foaming soap would work as a surfactant. I'm still looking. I hope someone else can provide a better answer.
            It's that whole surfactant issue. Anything that is going to coat the metal and resist galling of the surfaces is not the sort of thing we want going into our lungs. Then there's the whole chemical issue of what the surfactant actually is composed of and any effect on our internal makeup.

            I thought misting would be a great idea until I realized that a fine enough mist would float around and be inhaled. So I stuck with my small little squirt bottles.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
              Is it any worse than eating at Taco Bell?
              No. carry on.

              As for misters, I did a some research and ended up building my own. What you want is a stream of small droplets hitting wheel at approximately the wheel's speed just before grinding. To achieve that, it is critical that you have separate pressure controls for the air and liquid. When you get it set right, you don't really get any fogging, at least its not noticeable
              Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-08-2018, 02:29 PM.
              .

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              • #8
                I looked into this a while back, had concerns over health etc with mist, in the end i ordered a Fog-Buster from the US, not cheap but it creates large-droplet fog not mist, there is no air-borne mist from it. I use it on the mill and it works great, no smell, no mist no mess, i'm using veg based oil in it made for mist/fog, probably no good on a grinder though.
                If it does'nt fit, hit it.
                https://ddmetalproducts.co.uk
                http://www.davekearley.co.uk

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                • #9
                  I use a kool mist on my belt grinder witb plain water. Wkrks good.
                  How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                  • #10
                    I use a kool mist on my belt grinder witb plain water. Wkrks good.
                    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

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                    • #11
                      Plain water on the grinder or belt sander is a GREAT IDEA! No health issues (still need to wear a filter anyway to avoid "black snot") and keeps the fingers cool. I might just need to resurface this project just for this application.

                      It does mean we'll need to clean the grinding area more thoroughly after use though. All that wet steel dust is going to turn orange and crusty in the blink of an eye otherwise.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
                        Is it any worse than eating at Taco Bell?
                        There's other cancers that go along with it. I'll just say I hope you have your "family" established and peeing in a bag strapped to your leg doesn't bother you.

                        I don't eat at Taco Bell so I don't know.

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                        • #13
                          Well, with all the health risks of misting, perhaps I will just go with straight water or continue to mop a little water over what ever I'm grinding with a Q tip.
                          I think I can adjust this mister to dribble a little as opposed to spraying a fine mist. I'll have to play with it again.
                          My main reason for asking about a mister solution is because they have rust inhibitors in them. I don't like using plain water if it's going to run all over.

                          JL..............

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                          • #14
                            Add a little (like 2 drops/liter) dish detergent to misting bottle for steel. It won't prevent rust, but it will drop the viscosity of the water and get the coolant into where it is needed.

                            Use a couple of milli-liters of household vinegar in the misting solution for doing silicon-aluminum/bronze alloys.

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                            • #15
                              Have you looked at the "Fog buster" style mister? It works the way McGyver describes. It has separate controls for the air blast and the liquid supply so that the droplets get deposited to the workpiece and cutter for cooling while the air blast helps blow the chips away. The liquid droplets deposit on the part but are large enough that can't float around the room. If you google "fog buster" you will find a lot of info on the design as well as a number of sets of plans. They are not very hard to make.

                              I built one years ago that works as advertised. I don't use it too often but plan to once I'm done plumbing air over by my mill. Not sure how well they work for grinding, but seems they should work at least as well as mopping with a Q-tip.

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