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Setup 2 shop vises

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  • Setup 2 shop vises

    I just setup a 8" Wilton vise and a 6" rotating clamp/pipe vise in the shop. I set them up at each end of a 4'x8' work bench. I've had them for over 10 years but never set them up in my previous shop so this is the first time I'm actually going to be using them.








  • #2
    I have one of the rotating kind, exactly like in the bottom 2 pictures. It's been a very good vise for a lot of years. I think you'll get a lot of use out of that one. The Wilton one is good too, of course, but not as versatile.

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    • #3
      Yea, I'm looking forward to putting them to use. I agree, the rotating vise is definitely much more versatile. I love how you can both turn and rotate it.

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      • #4
        If you set them both on one side of the bench, with the fixed jaws in line, you can hold long pieces of work much more securely.

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        • #5
          They look like they are getting ready to conduct a duel across the bench of honor in hope of finding the favor of your affections....

          My own main vise is one of the larger rotating sort. I can't really tell if it's the same size as yours. Mine measures 11 3/8 to the normal jaws when they up up and level and the ram is 2 1/2" diameter. It's been a faithful and hard working companion for nearly 30 years. I think I'd rather give up my spleen than that vise..... The Wilton is no doubt a great vise too. But the flexibility of rotating the jaws has been very handy on many an occasion. And when I've been able to use the pipe side that too has been super handy.

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          • #6
            I always thought it would be fun to take a beater Wilton bullet vise and turn down the exterior casting and make a beefy circular split mount to put it into.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by Robin R View Post
              If you set them both on one side of the bench, with the fixed jaws in line, you can hold long pieces of work much more securely.
              I'm keeping a space available for a Esak76's vise on each corner

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              • #8
                Why does your shop always look like a warehouse of unused tools?

                Let's see 'em in action! Or at least throw some dirt around so they look like they've been used.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                  Why does your shop always look like a warehouse of unused tools?

                  Let's see 'em in action! Or at least throw some dirt around so they look like they've been used.
                  I'm getting there. My shop is almost all setup. I need to clean off my new welding table next. It became a dumping ground for everything else I'm trying to find homes for. I also need to assemble a bunch of shelves that are going up on my mezzanine and organize everything that's going up on the mezzanine. I need to change the oil in the surface grinder, and clean it up and I think that's it, the shop will be ready for projects.

                  EDIT: Forgot I still need to cleanup the grinding/buffing bench and find homes for all of the junk that I stashed under it. I also have an Align power feed for the knee on my Bridgeport that I haven't installed yet but that could wait. And I wanted to run power drops for the surface grinder + BP instead of just running the power on the ground for them.
                  Last edited by 3 Phase Lightbulb; 02-14-2018, 12:18 AM.

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                  • #10
                    I just got an Asong knee feed installed on the BP. Well, everything but pinning up the wires. Got a tip for you; DO NOT follow the YT video install instructions. (Old iron man or something like that.) When he installs the extension shaft, he turns it up tight. When you do that, you preload the knee crank bearing. (Bad idea for that roller bearing and causes noise.) Also check that there's clearance between the extension shaft and the needle bearing in the power feed housing. I had to press the bearing forward and trim about .050" off the face of the extension where that bearing is not supposed to touch. Don't test run it until the crank sleeve is pinned either. Doing that will also preload the knee crank bearing or unscrew the extension shaft into the needle bearing.



                    Last edited by CCWKen; 02-14-2018, 10:14 AM. Reason: Added Pics

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                    • #11
                      I have one of those rotating vises. I grabbed it off a pallet of scrap vises that were returns from a junk tool store that sold Buffalo brand garbage tools. Kinda like HF only worse. There were at least two pallets stacked with these import vises. Every one of them cracked at the throat. The guy at the store gave me one. I took it home and squeezed it together and welded it up. I just wanted to use it for my welding bench because of it's versatility. It comes in real handy for welding because you can rotate it. In fact I have two of them, a big one and a smaller one.
                      I've never seen an American made vise like that.

                      JL.................
                      Last edited by JoeLee; 02-14-2018, 09:15 AM.

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                      • #12
                        Yost markets rotating-jaw vises: $179, Chinese-sourced, 3-year casting warranty. I have one - the quality is OK, but I wouldn't want to use a 3-foot cheater bar on something clamped in the jaws. It's marketed as "heavy duty" - a bit silly for a 60-pound vise - but maybe accurate for a homeowner vise. I'm happy with it - but always mindful that it is not "industrial duty".

                        https://www.amazon.com/Yost-Heavy-Du...re-bullets-btf

                        https://www.homedepot.com/p/Yost-5-i...0-DI/202786343
                        Last edited by tlfamm; 02-14-2018, 10:12 AM.

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                        • #13
                          There are many different import versions of that style over a number of decades.. some total crap, some pretty good. I have also seen one or two American made versions from the 1950's +/-.

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                          • #14
                            I was mistaken. I thought mine was a 6" but it's actually a 5" Harbor Freight #5655. I bought it 10+ years ago but never mounted it in my old shop. I don't remember where I bought the Wilton 8" but I bought it around the same time too. I vaguely remember buying it on Ebay but not sure.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by softtail View Post
                              There are many different import versions of that style over a number of decades.. some total crap, some pretty good. I have also seen one or two American made versions from the 1950's +/-.
                              Charles Parker made a vise like that. I believe the model # was 839.

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