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Brian does Ridders flame eater

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Brian:

    I thought you concluded that you WOULD oil the piston? I seem to recall you had started out figuring to run it dry, and I thought you had decided to use oil. If so, maybe the WD diluted it and made it thinner, less "draggy". It wasn't very draggy in the video from before, though.

    Looking back at the videos, the one you had where it did not work (that I missed seeing):

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=JPiwXM4xSvM

    In that one, it did not look nearly as "free" as in the other one where you demonstrated how free it was. I'd say it only coasted about 1/3 to 1/2 as long in that link above as when you did the coasting demo.

    Was there any difference in lube?
    Last edited by J Tiers; 03-05-2018, 01:22 AM.

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  • danlb
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    Super!

    if you watch the last video I linked, you will see that before running the engine, he "oiled the pistons". Each of the 4 cylinders has a small cup that he put oil in, which presumably went right into the cylinder. I was not clear if the little screw he turned wa a drip oiler or just a valve to let oil in, which is closed before running. I suspect the latter.

    It would seem to take VERY little leakage to make the engine not run. Presumably his oil, and your WD40, lubed and sealed the piston enough more to make it work.
    What a great post. Now if you'd just figured it out and posted it before Brian figured it out, that would have been great. Could have saved days of angst for Brian.


    Brian, congrats on another successful build. YOU are amazing!

    Dan

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  • sasquatch
    replied
    Great news Brian, Congrats!!

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    Super!

    if you watch the last video I linked, you will see that before running the engine, he "oiled the pistons". Each of the 4 cylinders has a small cup that he put oil in, which presumably went right into the cylinder. I was not clear if the little screw he turned wa a drip oiler or just a valve to let oil in, which is closed before running. I suspect the latter.

    It would seem to take VERY little leakage to make the engine not run. Presumably his oil, and your WD40, lubed and sealed the piston enough more to make it work.

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  • vpt
    replied
    Nice work Brian! Runs very smooth and pleasing.

    Were you able to speed it up at all?

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  • Jon Heron
    replied
    Good work!
    Cheers,
    Jon

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  • Willy
    replied
    Fantastic news Brian, we just had a full moon a few days ago so perhaps being on the back side of it helps align the polar momentum.

    Congratulations!!!

    Amazing how particular these little fellows are as to what makes them run or not. Probably something to do with the efficiency and nano-hp output .

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    I must have got up on the right side of the bed this morning, because today I have a runner. The only thing different from my previous attempts to make this engine run is that I squirted some WD40 into the cylinder before I tried to run it. I am using methyl hydrate (gasline anti-freeze) for fuel. Nothing has been changed mechanically since I finished the engine earlier this week. I have a stick of machinable graphite on order to make a new valve and piston from, which will replace the current cast iron piston and valve. Oh, I am so happy. There is nothing worse than building an engine and knowing that you've done everything right, and then the engine won't run!!---Brian
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=tI77...ature=youtu.be

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  • brian Rupnow
    replied
    There are some fantastic flame eaters on Youtube. I did preheat my cylinder. I tried it with some oil. I tried it without any oil. I tried with every conceivable flame height and 95% alcohol. I tried it with every flame position. I've tried clockwise rotation. I tried counterclockwise rotation. I'm now waiting for either a full moon, or to get my machinable graphite.

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  • Davek0974
    replied
    Interesting,

    I would like one of these....

    https://youtu.be/Mw1W7f_WtaM

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  • Sparky_NY
    replied
    Originally posted by Davek0974 View Post
    He mentioned warming the engine up before starting it. In fact, there are countless references to warming up these engines before they will start. Ridders instructions make reference too. Brian made no mention of warming his up before starting attempts. Ridders instructions give detailed measurement methods to tell if the engine is "loose" enough also.

    Here is a video about warm up with some good explanations in the comments section. https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zgbFoUE4VyY
    Last edited by Sparky_NY; 03-04-2018, 08:13 AM.

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  • Davek0974
    replied
    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
    That is a work of art

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  • J Tiers
    replied
    or this one.....

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sCy-BaQqzbc

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  • vpt
    replied
    After watching Brians video I just had to watch more. This one came up which is a similar design but with a glass cylinder. I don't think the cylinder material has much to do with if they run. But one thing to note is how far he has the wick pulled out (big flame) and how saturated the intake port is with fire. In many videos it seems people try to get the blue part of the flame at the intake port.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bDSY6kw4lkQ



    Sorry but I just had to share this one, I could listen to this one run for quite some time.

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rV9rhqXSnu0

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  • BCRider
    replied
    If not compression what about suction? If you remove the valve rod and hold the valve closed does it show decently low leakage?

    The bit about the stainless steel being a poor heat conductor may be an avenue to explore as well. Although in that case I'd expect it to work at first while the steel is still a good heat sink. But then as the liner warms up and the heat does not conduct well out to the fins that the inner wall warmth could cause it to run down. But you say you're not even getting it to run at all?

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