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Brian does Ridders flame eater

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  • #76
    Its Boyles Law at work. Also, the term Vacuum is used as a absolute when in fact there are degrees of vacuum. Anything below atmospheric pressure can be considered a vacuum. The hot air being drawn in is NOT compressed like in a regular IC engine so any cooling lowers the pressure (Boyles law again). The heat element is probably not going to be near as hot as the alcohol burner so when cooled to ambient there will be less differential, aka less power in the case of this engine, I doubt it would work unless it was extremely hot.

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    • #77
      -I oiled everything up because turning this thing over by hand you could feel the "roughness" of bare metal scraping on bare metal. I am sure that the oil will add some "stiction" and perhaps prevent the engine from running. I have half a mind to hook an external drive to the flywheel and let it run with oil on everything for a couple of hours just to wear down any "high spots", then flush all the oil away with laquer thinners.
      Brian Rupnow
      Design engineer
      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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      • #78
        Maybe the idea of the graphite piston was for it to be self-lubing without any liquid lube?

        If so that is a clever idea. I'm not sure that all forms of graphite are as slippery as one might assume, though. The EDM graphite does not seem slippery.
        CNC machines only go through the motions.

        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

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        • #79
          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
          Maybe the idea of the graphite piston was for it to be self-lubing without any liquid lube?

          If so that is a clever idea. I'm not sure that all forms of graphite are as slippery as one might assume, though. The EDM graphite does not seem slippery.
          Exactly.... I looked over the plans because I have been tempted to build one for a long time. Another advantage of graphite is no corrosion from the condensation. (same reason for the stainless cylinder)

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          • #80
            Just thinking out loud here and hopefully not meaning to derail Brian's thread.
            However since the largest portion of friction in the engine is going to be generated between the piston and cylinder, would the initial use of a sooty flame aid in coating this interface with carbon in order to reduce friction? My thinking is that since graphite is basically carbon it may help.
            Not having any experience in this area or having a back to back comparison to prove or disprove this idea I was wondering if this may be of any benefit.
            Thoughts.

            Great progress already Brian, it's looking good. I've always wanted to build one of these so I'm eagerly waiting for this little jewel to be running.
            Thanks again for taking the time to document another build.
            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

            Location: British Columbia

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            • #81
              Originally posted by Willy View Post
              would the initial use of a sooty flame aid in coating this interface with carbon in order to reduce friction? My thinking is that since graphite is basically carbon it may help..
              :-) Yes and so is Diamond carbon (also very pure) If you read a bit about the various forms that carbon can exist in you'll soon wonder how you could have ever thought that idea. :-)
              ...lew...

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              • #82
                Originally posted by Lew Hartswick View Post
                :-) Yes and so is Diamond carbon (also very pure) If you read a bit about the various forms that carbon can exist in you'll soon wonder how you could have ever thought that idea. :-)
                ...lew...
                Wow, I guess I've been extremely lucky that the carbon brushes in my electric motors haven't chewed up the commutators on the armatures in a nano second. And yes I do realize there are various forms of carbon, hence my question.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #83
                  And here we have a video of "running in" the engine. Even though the crankshaft and big end of the con-rod are riding on ball bearings, there is more "drag" than I like caused by the piston sliding in the cylinder (a lapped fit) and the valve rod sliding in it's drilled hole. I have coated everything with oil and will let it run for an hour, then put the entire engine in a solvent bath to wash out any oil and/or metallic residue. It is running very slowly in the video, I doubled the speed after it had ran for a few minutes.
                  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=_Nea...ature=youtu.be
                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                  Comment


                  • #84
                    Here is a crazy one:

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Mw1W7f_WtaM

                    And one that appears to run extremely freely. It may be a commercially made version, but has a very different valve.

                    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n1Tpgc8LwiU
                    CNC machines only go through the motions.

                    Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                    Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                    Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                    I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                    Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                    Comment


                    • #85
                      Jerry--I have watched about 20 different videos of this exact engine running, and they all seem to run effortlessly. Some guys have even arranged them as twin cylinder engines. I have 12 running "steam" engines which I run on compressed air, 12 running gasoline engines, and one running Stirling engine. I am much happier when they run right away without a lot of re-jigging and head scratching. I have a family "get together" to attend today (Bunch of grandchildren with birthdays close together), so I'm doing something relatively quiet and "clean" until my good wife comes downstairs and tells me it's time to go.
                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #86
                        Nothing intended by links other than showing a couple interesting designs, and the very free running of the single cylinder version, despite an ordinary-looking piston like yours.

                        Did the other engines use the graphite piston?
                        CNC machines only go through the motions.

                        Ideas expressed may be mine, or from anyone else in the universe.
                        Not responsible for clerical errors. Or those made by lay people either.
                        Number formats and units may be chosen at random depending on what day it is.
                        I reserve the right to use a number system with any integer base without prior notice.
                        Generalizations are understood to be "often" true, but not true in every case.

                        Comment


                        • #87
                          Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                          Nothing intended by links other than showing a couple interesting designs, and the very free running of the single cylinder version, despite an ordinary-looking piston like yours.

                          Did the other engines use the graphite piston?
                          I really aren't sure.
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                          Comment


                          • #88
                            Okay--the hour is up, and I just pulled the set-up apart. The engine turns amazingly free now compared to what it did before running it in. Won't have much to report now until I get the alcohol burner built.
                            Brian Rupnow
                            Design engineer
                            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                            Comment


                            • #89
                              Before I build the alcohol burner, I have to source a wick. The diameter of the metal barrel that comes out of the top of the burner depends on what wick you use. On Jan Ridders plans the inside diameter of this pipe is 7 mm which is just a bit larger than 1/4". The only wick I can buy in Barrie is for Tiki torches and is 1/2" diameter. I just ordered a ten foot length of 1/4" wick from Ebay, and I think its coming from China---they give mid March as a delivery date. This doesn't make me overly happy, but I don't seem to have a lot of options. I may just go ahead and make the alcohol burner and leave the pipe solid, then drill it out to size when I have the wick here in my hands.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                              Comment


                              • #90
                                Jan Ridders plans show a very nice little alcohol burner fabricated by soldering a number of pieces of 1 mm and 2 mm thick brass together. I happen to have a short piece of 1 1/2" square mild steel here that is just long enough to form the tank body and bottom plate from, and I can solder a separate piece of brass to the top to make a burner that will do for me. Since the tank body will then be made of steel, I can put a magnet size counterbore in the top of the engines aluminum baseplate and epoxy a strong magnet in place. That will prevent the tank from hopping around while the engine is running. (I'm an optimist.)

                                Brian Rupnow
                                Design engineer
                                Barrie, Ontario, Canada

                                Comment

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