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  • 13x40 headstock removal

    I bought a 13x40 lathe from a closed machine shop and now have to figure out how to get it down my cellar stairs. I've taken a couple Millrites down, but only after disassembling them. The lathe is 1350 pounds or so and I'm a little uncomfortable with that so I'd like to separate it into cabinet, bed and headstock. The parts manuals I've seen online don't make it clear how to do that so I'm wondering if anyone here knows how.

  • #2
    you'd get a more exact answer if we knew what 13x40 lathe it is....but generally lathes that size have the headstock registered to the V way and have a couple bolts securing the headstock to the bed. feel around under the headstock. Thats not that heavy a lathe, with the headstock and carriage off, strapped to a hand truck I'd two guys could get the bed downstairs, but don't do anything that doesn't feel right.
    in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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    • #3
      My 12x36, the head is not registered on the v-ways, as it is a gap bed lathe. Just understand that if you take the head off, you will need to spend a lot of time re-aligning the headstock to the bed and all of that...


      Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro

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      • #4
        Originally posted by RB211 View Post
        My 12x36, the head is not registered on the v-ways, as it is a gap bed lathe. Just understand that if you take the head off, you will need to spend a lot of time re-aligning the headstock to the bed and all of that...


        Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk Pro
        good point.....I was thinking if it is V registered its easy to reinstall.....but if its not.....
        in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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        • #5
          Some lathes, gap bed or not, have the V-ways extending under the headstock and have the headstock registering on those ways. On those machines, the headstock was usually bored in-situ with a machine that also registered to the ways.

          Other manufacturers chose to bore their headstocks seperately and probably on more generic machinery They then have screws that allow the alignment to be adjusted.

          Many top quality lathes of both types have been produced.

          Never assume that any lathe of the second type has its headstock correctly aligned. A crash, or rough handling during trasportation may have moved it.
          Paul Compton
          www.morini-mania.co.uk
          http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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          • #6
            If its a generic 13 x 40 lathe there are 4 bolts holding down the headstock, 2 below the spindle and 2 at the other end.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by EVguru View Post
              On those machines, the headstock was usually bored in-situ
              .
              They were? Can you give some examples?

              The ones I've seen, both on the bottoms of the headstock, and the in their manufacture, were scraped to fit the bed and into alignment
              Mcgyver
              Senior Member
              Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-21-2018, 11:15 AM.
              in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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              • #8
                If your lathe hasn't been registered yet, is there a deadline?

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by EVguru View Post
                  ... Never assume that any lathe of the second type has its headstock correctly aligned. A crash, or rough handling during trasportation may have moved it.
                  So how can you tell if your headstock is correctly aligned or not?
                  Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                  • #10
                    For around $100 on Amazon and eBay, you can buy morse taper test bars. Coupled with dial test indicator and a machinist level to ensure the bed is level, you should be all set.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by RichR View Post
                      So how can you tell if your headstock is correctly aligned or not?
                      Is that a real question or just poking fun at how often that is bantered about?

                      It is somewhat difficult to tell as its not always easy to isolate headstock misalignment from twist and wear. Alignment is done when manufactured or reconditioned and is set and forget. With a freshly ground or scraped bed, you first level the bed. Now you have no twist or wear. Mount something in a chuck truly round and a consistent diameter (or you are really fancy use a test bar) and measure it in planes at the chuck and say 6" out. A bit of math you can tell how much and in what direction it is out.

                      Its my opinion that head stock misalignment is going to be very rare if it was a quality made lathe. If it does register on a V, as all ones of that size I've worked on do, and was a quality lathe that hadn't undergone some catastrophic crash, there will be no shims and the OP can take the headstock off and reattached without affecting the alignment. I've hardly seen everything, but its an opinion formed from working on a lot and noticing how big a force there'd have to be to knock it out of alignment, I think you'd severely damage the spindle first. In any event it would have to be a major impact the likes of which most lathes never see.
                      Mcgyver
                      Senior Member
                      Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-21-2018, 11:36 AM.
                      in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by Mcgyver View Post
                        Is that a real question or just poking fun at how often that is bantered about? ...
                        It' a real question, for the very reason you give here:
                        It is somewhat difficult to tell as its not always easy to isolate headstock misalignment from twist and wear.
                        The OP may be interested too since it might influence his decision on whether or not to pull his headstock.
                        Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                        • #13
                          It' a real question, for the very reason you give here:
                          wasn't meaning to be a smart ass, its one of those subjects it seems.....

                          Originally posted by RichR View Post
                          The OP may be interested too since it might influence his decision on whether or not to pull his headstock.
                          If its a well made lathe and the headstock is registered on the V way it shouldn't be an issue. The "well made" phrase is just a bit of hedge on my part in case there is some absolute POS that uses bamboo shoots for alignment shims which is seems unlikely. Lathes are suppose to have the head stock directly mounted to the bed with no shims as has been the case with everyone I've had apart, which means there is no issue in re attaching it and getting the same alignment.
                          Mcgyver
                          Senior Member
                          Last edited by Mcgyver; 02-21-2018, 12:28 PM.
                          in Toronto Ontario - where are you?

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                          • #14
                            And. the headstock portion of the ways (plus bottom features of headstock) get no wear, so that issue is not a problem with the H/S.

                            If you re-scrape the ways, you probably still do not need to do anything to the headstock, because you now have good ways, and a headstock that was aligned to the prior way surfaces... it should line right up, UNLESS it was not done right to begin with.

                            Now, if you have changed the way shape at all, then you may have an issue which obliges you to re-do the headstock base scraping. A wise person uses the H/S as the guide to shaping the V ways on which it sits, usually the tailstock ways.
                            J Tiers
                            Senior Member
                            Last edited by J Tiers; 02-21-2018, 02:22 PM.
                            2730

                            Keep eye on ball.
                            Hashim Khan

                            Everything not impossible is compulsory

                            Birds are NOT real, they are spying on you

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                            • #15
                              I had a 13x40 Grizzly and it was bolted down from the top with 4 cap bolts.

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