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Bridgeport feed reverse knob drawing

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  • Bridgeport feed reverse knob drawing

    Does anyone have a dimension drawing of the feed reverse knob for a Bridgeport J series mill? Mine is missing and I would rather fabricate one than buy. Need to hone my fabrication skills.

  • #2
    Originally posted by Canus View Post
    Does anyone have a dimension drawing of the feed reverse knob for a Bridgeport J series mill? Mine is missing and I would rather fabricate one than buy. Need to hone my fabrication skills.
    I've lived with what appears to be a 10-32 screw for near 15 years on my Lagun. Seems a knob would just be more area to slam with my hand when moving fast on the front of the mill.

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    • #3
      Originally posted by rkepler View Post
      I've lived with what appears to be a 10-32 screw for near 15 years on my Lagun.
      Mine is a little more luxurious. It's a piece of thread cut off a fastener and screwed into a hole tapped into the end of a piece of 3/8" round stock about 5/8" long.

      As I recall, the genuine item is about those dimensions, but knurled and with a couple of square grooves.
      Paul Compton
      www.morini-mania.co.uk
      http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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      • #4
        I happen to have one of these sitting in front of me right now. The thread is 8-32, 1/4" long with a thread relief about 1/16" long. The original swivels on a 1/4" diameter shaft with a 5/16 diameter slotted screw head on one side and a retaining ring on the threaded side to hold it all together. The retaining ring is about 3/32" from the threads. The outer bit is 7/16" diameter, 1" long with a couple of short knurled sections and counter bored to fit the screw head on the swivel shaft.
        Stuart de Haro

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        • #5
          I have the Premium Luxury Model! Mine is an 8-32 screw about 1" long that goes through a flared brass knob. Even has knurling! Mine is made so the wheel doesn't come off and get lost.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
            I have the Premium Luxury Model! Mine is an 8-32 screw about 1" long that goes through a flared brass knob. Even has knurling! Mine is made so the wheel doesn't come off and get lost.
            Wheels are usually lost on purpose as they get in the way. I don't see too many of them on mills that have been in a shop for a while, mostly just on new mills.

            I think I know where the handwheel for my Lagun is. I've never had it on there in close to 20 years.

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            • #7
              Originally posted by rkepler View Post
              Wheels are usually lost on purpose as they get in the way. I don't see too many of them on mills that have been in a shop for a while, mostly just on new mills.

              I think I know where the handwheel for my Lagun is. I've never had it on there in close to 20 years.
              I think their usefulness is overlooked, they allow a lot of extra control. Just the other evening I was opening up a 1/2" hole in the side of a stainless steel tube to 3/4" by plunging a four flute endmill. Using the fine feed made that job go really easily.
              Paul Compton
              www.morini-mania.co.uk
              http://www.youtube.com/user/EVguru

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              • #8
                I use mine often enough to leave it on. It's not in the way of anything I do. I can still get to the down feed lever. What else is there?

                Added:
                I was just using mine the other day to sneak up on a drill depth.
                Last edited by CCWKen; 03-13-2018, 06:11 PM. Reason: Addition

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                • #9
                  The fine handwheel feed on a Bridgeport mill has a lot of backlash.
                  You can get into trouble with it when a cutter wants to self-feed and
                  bite into the work or pull during break-through. The feed gears are
                  extremely light and very fragile. I would hesitate to use the fine
                  feed for anything heavy or critical. When using the power feed for
                  boring, it pays to be mindful of where the clock spring is set for
                  quill tension, as to whether the feed is letting the quill fall or is it
                  feeding it down against the spring. It makes a difference if you want
                  repeatable depth results.

                  --Doozer
                  DZER

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                  • #10
                    Good point but the dainty little gears aren't used on a manual feed. You could say the same for the feed handle.

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                    • #11
                      I don't think I've worked with any Bridgeport that still had its quill feed hand wheel... except my own! Since I mounted a DRO on the quill I use it routinely. Much easier to set a cutter depth precisely than with the lever.

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                      • #12
                        Thanks for all the helpful replies.

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                        • #13
                          As a note; About 10 turns of the hand wheel provides one inch of down feed. It takes about 1/4 turn on the handle to move the same amount.

                          Here's mine.

                          Last edited by CCWKen; 03-20-2018, 12:57 AM.

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