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Cutting leadscrew telescopic springs.

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  • Cutting leadscrew telescopic springs.

    I stumbled on a pair of telescopic springs on ebay at a good price to fit to the museum's Smart & Brown model A. They were advertised as suitable for lathes of up to 750mm between centres (the s & b is only 20"), and leadscrew diameter of up to 24mm diameter. I will have to loose some of the inner coils as the s &b's leadscrew is 1". Any tips for cutting the spring steel which is quite thin would be appreciated.

  • #2
    Angle grinder with thin 1mm disk
    Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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    • #3
      Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
      Angle grinder with thin 1mm disk
      Yup, best way. Dremel with one of those thin abrasive disks. You can also put thinish spring steel in the vise and smack it over to fracture it, but that wouldn't be handy with the coil.
      .
      "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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      • #4
        Tin snips will work too up to about .010" material. Just don't cut to the end of the jaws--Stop about 1/4" from the tips. Cut like you would a long sheet of paper. If you cut to the end of the jaws, it will most likely crack. I've cut spring steel stock with my sheer and circle cutter. (Used to restore old auto horns.)

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        • #5
          Tackled one today, the metal is so thin, it cuts with ordinary heavy duty scissors. Not knowing what would happen, I released one of the springs while it was on a length of 5/8" steel bar and protected my fingers with shop rags. These type of spring must be allowed to rotate when they move, so end fittings will be made. The right hand end of the apron has been drilled and tapped for a support cup, the left end has a projecting bronze bush which will be easier to sort something out. the small ends of the springs will be at the ends of the leadscrew, I haven't thought about that yet.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by TGTool View Post
            Yup, best way. Dremel with one of those thin abrasive disks. You can also put thinish spring steel in the vise and smack it over to fracture it, but that wouldn't be handy with the coil.
            Last time I did that I slipped spring over a pipe, then snugged it down with a hose clamp. smoothed end with a dressing stone simply because I dislike sharp edges bearing against anything.

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