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A 1984 Bosch drill, Wow!

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  • A 1984 Bosch drill, Wow!

    My wife's Aunt this week moved into a Senior home. Her husband died 20 years ago. They lived in an apartment in Munich, Germany. My wife went there this week to help her Aunt sort through 40 years of stuff. She brought home a Bosch drill in a METAL box! The price tag was still on the box. He paid 180 DM for the drill in 1984. This drill was only used to drill holes to mount pictures on the walls. Of course it is a corded drill but this thing is heavy and when you hold it in your hands you know you are holding a quality tool. My wife handed me the case and told me this thing is pretty old and did I want it or should she take it to the charity. I opened it and thought this thing belongs in a museum in a glass case! They just don't make tools of this quality anymore.
    Location: The Black Forest in Germany

    How to become a millionaire: Start out with 10 million and take up machining as a hobby!

  • #2
    your lucky it was an apartment and not a house. the drill is way overprised. no gears? in that case its worthless. a porsche turbo was 32 grand at that time. figure it out. 250 today. go and measure runout and report, please.

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    • #3
      Very Cool BF. I have a few old tools like that, an old Porter-Cable 1/2" drill with a metal case that must be from the 1960's. It weighs a ton but has incredible torque. Those things were built for serious business. I don't use it very often, but I'm careful to note where it's going if the bit hangs up so it doesn't wind my arms up. Nice find.

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      • #4
        That was the real manly tool era. Power tools with power and built to last forever. If you were strong enough to hold them, you could build anything. Contrast that to todays mickey mouse plastic toys that seldom last 15 minutes before a recharge is needed. But that's about the limit of attention of most of todays users. If it takes more than 10 minutes, it's hired out for someone else to do.

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        • #5
          tough crowd here,
          san jose, ca. usa

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          • #6
            1984 is quite recent and only just before the plastic era. My single speed cast body black and decker drill from about 1968 for <£5 is the best tool with a direct fitting wire brush for de-rusting. Just recently found a new wire brush one ebay for about £12 as the old one was worn down to 1/8 in.

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            • #7
              I chucked away my Black and Decker D720 metal drill 30 years ago after I found that the wiring insulation inside had become hard and was cracking off the wires in places.
              The drill was new in about 1968.

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              • #8
                I do like the modern tools, really. The Milwaukee cordless drill I bought last year impressed me with how powerful it is compared to its compact size. The thing that does slightly bug me is the tendency to make power tools with brightly colored plastic and lots of swoopy rubber parts, such that they look like toys or 1950's ray guns. I tend to prefer tools that just look like tools.

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                • #9
                  My Milwaukee drill from about 1983 is still going strong despite the thousands of holes I have tapped by powering in slowly then flipping into full speed reverse while still turning forward! Tools were made to last back then and parts were available to fix them too.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by CCWKen View Post
                    That was the real manly tool era. Power tools with power and built to last forever. If you were strong enough to hold them, you could build anything.
                    Got that right.

                    My eyes were probably as big as the 5.5" brush when I saw this 9 amp grinder. it runs very smooth at 4200rpm, smoother than many bench grinders. I couldn't believe it was still at an estate sale of tools after I got there late at 11AM, priced at $3. The little 19" Black & Decker (3 amps) was also $3. It feels great in the hands. When do you ever see castings like that today?




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                    • #11
                      About 3 weeks ago I found an almost complete Black & Decker drill from around 1947-1952, at least according to Popular Mechanics magazine of the time.

                      It has an MC-10 Multi-Craft Jacobs chuck (5/64 - 1/2 inch, with 1/2 x 20 threaded arbor), which has no contemporary listed on the Jacobs website

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                      • #12
                        I have a Bosch corded drill I got in 1969. Rated for 220 vac, two speed, no reverse. I've used it ever since on 110 and it's powerful enough and fast enough. The odd time I've used it on 220, and yes it's powerful enough to break a wrist. Still has the original cord, and it's still flexible. It's not clunky like many of these old-timers were, but it does have heft. It is still my favorite drill.
                        I seldom do anything within the scope of logical reason and calculated cost/benefit, etc- I'm following my passion-

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