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Best gearbox style for torque?

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  • Davek0974
    replied
    Its amazing (honestly) but it won't fit on top of a Bridgeport mill

    Does anyone know of there is space inside a QC30 spindle socket for gripper fingers?

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    That's incredible ! had no idea --- this is not some crashbox with two shafts and some shifting forks,,,

    this thing is incredibly advanced for it's time... look at it bolted up to that old engine, it's like aliens intervened right where the flywheel starts...

    Way ta go Henry - thanks Sarge.

    http://www.mtfca.com/discus/messages/50893/79660.jpg

    http://modelt.ca/wp-content/uploads/...ansmission.gif

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Forgotten? I never even knew about it but thanks that's exactly what im looking for to study and see how he did it, not as simple as a low rpm rear bicycle hub im thinking as those don't store any momentum in the parts to speak of, thanks Sarge very cool to check out...

    Leave a comment:


  • sarge41
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    Planetary system is a beautiful thing, loads are all self centering and yes very efficient, it's the reason why a modern automatic transmission with torque converter lock-out can out-due a modern manual MPG's that's using the same thin fluid...

    I do not like worm drive, LOTS of friction there they basically operate on "scuffing" action. although there are roller worm drives that eliminate that, very pricey

    there's also duel planetary that rival the gearing ratio's of many worm drives but now your talking complexities and money also ...

    Edit; im wondering if anyone knows of a 3 speed manual transmission that has ever been in production for automobiles or even trucks that used the planetary system --- for along time i thought "why not" but now im thinking it might be hard to add synchromesh to units like this...
    Boomer: Have you forgotten about the "manual" planetary transmission that Henry Ford used for years in his Model T cars and trucks?

    Sarge41

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  • Davek0974
    replied
    Originally posted by Magicniner View Post
    Do you have room for a Conical Spring stack for tension and an air/hydraulic release mechanism?
    Will need to change to a pull-stud gripper for that, its a possibility if there is room in the spindle

    Leave a comment:


  • garyhlucas
    replied
    I bought a Kurt power drawbar with an air wrench for the shop years ago. It saved so much time in production work on a Bridgeport that it paid for itself in a couple months. I was having some parts made by a local shop and the guys dad did a lot of the work on the Bridgeport. I saw he had a step next to the machine because he was short and had trouble tightening the drawbar. I told him about the Kurt attachment. He actually bought one and his dad thanked me because it made the difference between him continuing to work or quiting because his shoulder could no longer take the abuse. You very quickly get a feel for how tight the tool is.

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  • Magicniner
    replied
    Do you have room for a Conical Spring stack for tension and an air/hydraulic release mechanism?

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Originally posted by Doozer View Post
    Syncromesh comes from cone clutches just ahead of the drive dogs.
    It has nothing to do with the gears.
    -D
    Correct - not talking about the gears at all - talking about fitting that into the ends of the planetary cage and all it's mass to have to stop or accelerate before engagement - keep this in mind - while that's all going on your having to do the opposite to the other either sun or ring - there's multiple combinations of what you have to start and stop - it's a hat trick to say the least...

    all gears on a modern manual transmission (non-crash-box) are in full engagement at all times (except reverse) they are just freewheeling as their engagement dogs (off to the sides) are not engaged (neutral) only one engagement dog can be engaged at a time {1/2/3/4/5)

    in the case of the planetary system actually TWO engagement dogs would have to be engaged at the same time to create a power transfer --- get it ?
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-11-2018, 01:32 PM.

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  • Doozer
    replied
    Syncromesh comes from cone clutches just ahead of the drive dogs.
    It has nothing to do with the gears.
    -D

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Planetary system is a beautiful thing, loads are all self centering and yes very efficient, it's the reason why a modern automatic transmission with torque converter lock-out can out-due a modern manual MPG's that's using the same thin fluid...

    I do not like worm drive, LOTS of friction there they basically operate on "scuffing" action. although there are roller worm drives that eliminate that, very pricey

    there's also duel planetary that rival the gearing ratio's of many worm drives but now your talking complexities and money also ...

    Edit; im wondering if anyone knows of a 3 speed manual transmission that has ever been in production for automobiles or even trucks that used the planetary system --- for along time i thought "why not" but now im thinking it might be hard to add synchromesh to units like this...
    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-11-2018, 12:32 PM.

    Leave a comment:


  • wierdscience
    replied
    Gearbox type I would go with a planetary,IIRC they are much more efficent as the ratio increases than a worm gearbox.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    Fair enough you got me there, except for the Zen part

    Leave a comment:


  • lakeside53
    replied
    Nooooooo.... the "setting is your ear; Press button, count impacts/time... [it's even in the kurt manual].

    Mine tools are changed before you even get up on the step stool to reach the top of the draw-bar.

    I'd say a good amount of my changes per day are for for edge-finder or probes. Easy to damage the typical hollow tube EF if your don't take some care with a power draw bar.

    Leave a comment:


  • A.K. Boomer
    replied
    It's all good but by the time you click in your setting and then go to proceed iv already got my tool changed and clamped down with the proper amount of force that "I felt" lol yeah - im that good

    Leave a comment:


  • lakeside53
    replied
    Originally posted by A.K. Boomer View Post
    I hate the idea of a PD on a home shop machine where time is not that critical - I like putting just the right torque on just the right endmill for the specific task at hand - I save my collets/spindle taper and drawbar threads for when I need them - chucking up a 3/4" endmill or my flycutter or my 5" chuck or whatever - the little 1/8" endmills barely get a cinch because their unit pressure is still off the charts with that...

    that being said if your incapable of tightening your drawbar properly due to health or physical reasons I would look into doing something with a simple cordless de-walt drill or the like - you would have to run a set of bevel gears to mount the unit sideways, you have gearing flexibility within this fact - the drill has immense flexibility with 3 speeds and torque ranges, and also has an adjuster ring to cam out for the smaller bits so your not godzilling your little endmills for no reason...

    just some food for thought...
    Eat this then and use a pneumatic or electric impact driver. The final torque from an impact type driver is adjustable... by time. Couple of "clicks" for an edge finder, 3-4 for a small EM, 2-3 seconds for a larger EM. I do this all the time.

    Pneumatic also has the advantage of auto-oiling (install one).
    Last edited by lakeside53; 03-11-2018, 11:13 AM.

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