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Senft "Poppin" ENGINE

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  • Senft "Poppin" ENGINE

    I just finished building the latest flame-licker engine designed by Jan Ridder, and my results were not what I hoped for. I did get it to run--long enough to get a video of it running.--But barely. I found it to be an easy build but a very temperamental and difficult engine to run. I don't think this was a result of my workmanship, as I have 25 other self built engines which all run quite well. It may have been my choice of 316 stainless steel for the cylinder. I tried it with a cast iron piston and valve and with a machinable graphite piston and valve, but the performance was no better with either material. I still want a flame licker engine which starts and runs repeatably, and after doing a fair bit of research have decided to build a "Poppin" engine from plans by Dr. J.R. Senft. I will attempt to post my progress and pictures of this engine as it is built.
    Brian Rupnow
    Design engineer
    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

  • #2
    I built the same Jan Ridder engine and never got it running. My Poppin'went on the second attempt.
    https://youtu.be/f1rv3nTnOck
    Last edited by Bmyers; 03-11-2018, 09:23 PM.

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    • #3
      I'm watching, Brian! This whole thing has been extremely educational... I know what not to do. Maybe if I give one a try I might stand a chance.

      Thank you for your excellent postings.

      Pete
      1973 SB 10K .
      BenchMaster mill.

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      • #4
        Originally posted by Bmyers View Post
        I built the same Jan Ridder engine and never got it running. My Poppin'went on the second attempt.
        https://youtu.be/f1rv3nTnOck
        What is the operating principal here? Is it internal combustion by sucking in gases from the flame?

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        • #5
          If you really squint hard, and use your imagination, you can see the frame of this engine layed out on a piece of 2" x 1" aluminum bar.--Everything has to start somewhere.
          Brian Rupnow
          Design engineer
          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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          • #6
            Gary--Operational principal is that when you spin the engine over by hand, it sucks an external flame from an alcohol burner into the cylinder. Then the valve closes and the flame inside goes out, thus rapidly cooling and creating a vacuum. The vacuum pulls the piston back to top dead center, and just as it gets there the valve opens and sucks in another flame.--The operation then hopefully continues to repeat itself.
            Brian Rupnow
            Design engineer
            Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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            • #7
              Use thermal diffusivity in selection of material for the cylinder.

              Aluminum-silicon alloy is exceptional; machinability, hardness/ wear resistance, thermal diffusivity.

              7075, 6061 would be other options in aluminum alloys
              Last edited by bob_s; 03-12-2018, 01:00 PM. Reason: Typo in alloy

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              • #8
                I am a rank amateur. I built the one you picture with ci cylinder and piston. After a bit of fiddling it ran well and would run as long as there was flame.

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                • #9
                  Well jeez, Louise--How many set-ups did you think there were going to be?

                  Brian Rupnow
                  Design engineer
                  Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                  • #10
                    And some more---

                    Brian Rupnow
                    Design engineer
                    Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                    • #11
                      And a few more---


                      Brian Rupnow
                      Design engineer
                      Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                      • #12
                        And considering that there were a couple more set-ups that I didn't photograph, that is a heck of a lot of work for something so small. I planned on making the cast iron cylinder today too, but I have to stop and grab some lunch (It's 3:00 PM here). I don't know if I'll do amymore today or not.
                        Brian Rupnow
                        Design engineer
                        Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                        • #13
                          I can't think of any good reason not to have a sexy cylinder---
                          Brian Rupnow
                          Design engineer
                          Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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                          • #14
                            Damn Brian you don't piss around when you get an idea in your head!

                            Yesterday evening at supper time I read that you were starting a new engine and here it is a scant few hours later and look at the progress you've made already. Holy cow you could do motivational talks to folks half your age on how use time efficiently and the art of getting things done.

                            So are we going to see a completed engine tomorrow afternoon, just kidding.
                            Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                            Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                            Location: British Columbia

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                            • #15
                              Willy--That's the only way I know how to work. On days when I don't have any design work from customers, I can make a lot of chips. I may finish the cylinder tomorrow.
                              Brian Rupnow
                              Design engineer
                              Barrie, Ontario, Canada

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