Announcement

Collapse
No announcement yet.

Stainless fasteners, going into Stainless material.

Collapse
X
 
  • Filter
  • Time
  • Show
Clear All
new posts

  • Stainless fasteners, going into Stainless material.

    I am designing a new part, need rust free fasteners.
    Seems easier to find stainless screws than bright plated.
    Does stainless into Stainless have the galling problems that stainless into steel has ?
    Do you have to use anti-seize, i would rather just loctite the fastener in.

    The parts may be shipped unassembled, and folks don't always follow instructions.

  • #2
    Stainless into stainless is what HAS the problem.

    Anti-sieze does stop it.

    You might not need loc-tite, it may weld itself. I have actually had it happen when I was spinning a nut onto a bolt by hand.... I have had it weld tightly enough that the torque to try to tighten or loosen it actually twisted off a 3/8" bolt. here is a pic of the bolt after removal of the pieces

    CNC machines only go through the motions

    Comment


    • #3
      J tiers has it exactly correct. The poorer the quality the worse the welding is.

      Comment


      • #4
        Yup, stainless on stainless is a disaster looking for a place to happen...
        Keith
        __________________________
        Just one project too many--that's what finally got him...

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by ahidley View Post
          J tiers has it exactly correct. The poorer the quality the worse the welding is.
          Gut feeling that the harder/stronger grades have been better,ie A4-80 instead of A4-70.
          Bolts better have nearly perfect looking thread with no nicks, burrs or machining marks.

          https://www.bssa.org.uk/topics.php?article=12
          https://www.nickelinstitute.org/~/Me...teel_9006_.pdf
          Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

          Comment


          • #6
            Copaslip.

            Comment


            • #7
              60% Dry Moly Paste, no issues with differential corrosion if moisture gets involved and Molybdenum Disulphide is a better friction modifier for high pressure contact than anything else other than Tungsten Disulphide.
              If you benefit from the Dunning-Kruger Effect you may not even know it ;-)

              Comment


              • #8
                I can imagine problems if a consumer not familiar with the torque ranges tries to
                tighten an M6 ( or 1/4-20) ss nut/bolt using a big crescent wrench in his living room.
                Maybe a stripe of anti seize on the bolt threads would help.

                I was involved with austenitic s/s metric bolts in heating frequency magnetic fields and vibration.
                Lots of bolts are used from vendors in many countries.

                As far as I know they are mostly factory assembled dry ( due to the numbers) using the helical lock (spring) washers.
                We were aware of the possible galling issue but it was infrequent/ not a problem including in service dis-assembly.

                Persons assembling , if not using torque wrenches, should have a periodic refresher
                with their hand wrenches comparing to a torque wrench, using a bolt in a vice.
                For example an M10 * 1.5 has various published ratings between 37 and 47 n.m
                https://app.box.com/s/3wfk2lho9h4hyexz6cih0wyhqowdvcae

                Comment


                • #9
                  Nickel anti-seize.
                  Len

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    I am starting to think I am safer using bright plated fasteners.
                    I used then into aluminum on other products without any problems.

                    Comment


                    • #11
                      Bright plated fasteners are more about looks than being corrosion resistant. If this thing of yours will be used where there's a rust problem then the plated fasteners will only look good for roughly a year and then they will rust.

                      I would LOVE to find a source for proper stainless wheel lug nuts. I've gone through three sets of the chrome finished lug nuts now and they only last about a year before the nuts are all badly corroded. And that was despite waxing the darn things when I washed and waxed the car.

                      Maybe just include a little baggie of the proper anti seize with a warning on the bag that there is a high potential for the fasteners to gall and seize if the anti seize isn't used.
                      Chilliwack BC, Canada

                      Comment


                      • #12
                        I use stainless fasteners every day in a corrosive environment. They are predominantly 18-8 low grade but I also use 316. Just use never seize and you will be fine. Just remember most stainless fasteners are not graded the same as regular steel as to the load rating. Jim

                        Comment


                        • #13
                          Make some! 416 would probably be ok, or even 17-4

                          Comment


                          • #14
                            I used to build a product with all stainless fasteners. Never-sieze on every thread that is an adjustment or needs frequent removal. Blue Loctite on everything that didn’t need to take apart. Never had a bolt sieze using the Loctite. Using nothing often was a problem even finger tight.

                            Comment


                            • #15
                              Get some hex stock and make your own wheel nuts.
                              The high end 4 x4 I was working on uses hard anodized aluminum nuts, Thru thread double tapered.l i think they are from a wide 5 wheel setup.
                              Try Keyser lugnuts.
                              Last edited by 754; 03-17-2018, 12:29 PM.

                              Comment

                              Working...
                              X