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What type of abrasive papers should a machinist have on hand

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  • What type of abrasive papers should a machinist have on hand

    Can someone tell me when it's appropriate to use crocus cloth over emery cloth and what grits of each should be kept on hand? Thanks.

  • #2
    Deportation papers are quite abrasive for some folks.

    The old tax laws are quite abrasive compared to the new tax laws on paper.

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    • #3
      I keep various grits from 80 to 2000 on hand. The only crocus cloth I have is 1200G. When its all gone (I have about half a sleeve left) I won't bother replacing it. I prefer wet or dry, its more versatile. Crocus is a "loose grit" abrasive, emery is bonded grit. Emery has pretty much been replaced by AlOx or SiC. Crocus is used for the final polish where the particles will pull off the backing rather than scratch into the material.
      Kevin

      More tools than sense.

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      • #4
        I use 3M Wet & Dry because I have a lot of left from the body shop. I have 80grt up to 2000grt in sheets and 80 and 220 in PSA disks.

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        • #5
          Originally posted by KJ1I View Post
          I keep various grits from 80 to 2000 on hand. The only crocus cloth I have is 1200G. When its all gone (I have about half a sleeve left) I won't bother replacing it. I prefer wet or dry, its more versatile. Crocus is a "loose grit" abrasive, emery is bonded grit. Emery has pretty much been replaced by AlOx or SiC. Crocus is used for the final polish where the particles will pull off the backing rather than scratch into the material.
          Thanks Kevin for your input, I'll look into AlOx and SiC. I usually go for sandpaper I have on hand. I don't remember using emory but a few times and crocus hardly ever. I know one should never be used to dress an electric motor's commutator, by your description crocus would be the one not to use.

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          • #6
            Originally posted by 3 Phase Lightbulb View Post
            Deportation papers are quite abrasive for some folks.

            The old tax laws are quite abrasive compared to the new tax laws on paper.
            I've never used deported or IRS papers so I don't know what grits they come in or what each is used for.

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            • #7
              I keep stock of wet-or-dry papers in 80 to 3000 grit and some flexible cloth backed aluminium oxide cloth in 120-320 grits.

              Never seen crocus cloth/paper around here and the dry paper is not that much cheaper compared to wetordry that I would bother to ever use it.
              Location: Helsinki, Finland, Europe

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              • #8
                Originally posted by MattiJ View Post
                I keep stock of wet-or-dry papers in 80 to 3000 grit and some flexible cloth backed aluminium oxide cloth in 120-320 grits.

                Never seen crocus cloth/paper around here and the dry paper is not that much cheaper compared to wetordry that I would bother to ever use it.
                Thanks for commenting MattiJ, I have a range now.

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                • #9
                  Originally posted by tackit View Post
                  Thanks for commenting MattiJ, I have a range now.
                  You don't list which country you are in, but since MattiJ is from Europe, I suspect the grits he referred to are P80 to P3000 using the FEPA P scale. If
                  you are in the US, you might be accustomed to the CAMI scale. A P400 grit is not the same as a 400 grit. Here's a chart that compares the scales:
                  http://www.fingerlakeswoodturners.co...Comparison.pdf
                  Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                  • #10
                    I just realized I probably don't have anything finer than 220. I grabbed several of these assortments on the big A:

                    https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01LZ6TG05

                    120/220/320/400/600/800/1000/1200/1500/2000/2500/3000

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                    • #11
                      Emory cloth is nasty.
                      Gary


                      Appearance is Everything...

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by goose View Post
                        Emory cloth is nasty.
                        Yes, don't put it in your mouth.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by RichR View Post
                          You don't list which country you are in, but since MattiJ is from Europe, I suspect the grits he referred to are P80 to P3000 using the FEPA P scale. If
                          you are in the US, you might be accustomed to the CAMI scale. A P400 grit is not the same as a 400 grit. Here's a chart that compares the scales:
                          http://www.fingerlakeswoodturners.co...Comparison.pdf
                          on a side note there is fepa p for sandpaper and fepa f for grinding wheels.

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                          • #14
                            Originally posted by dian View Post
                            on a side note there is fepa p for sandpaper and fepa f for grinding wheels.
                            True, and there are many more grit scales around. Here is a Google spreadsheet that maps 17 different grit scales for your viewing pleasure:
                            https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets...R-o/edit#gid=0
                            The link for that was found here:
                            https://www.bladeforums.com/threads/...-chart.856708/
                            Location: Long Island, N.Y.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by RichR View Post
                              You don't list which country you are in, but since MattiJ is from Europe, I suspect the grits he referred to are P80 to P3000 using the FEPA P scale. If
                              you are in the US, you might be accustomed to the CAMI scale. A P400 grit is not the same as a 400 grit. Here's a chart that compares the scales:
                              http://www.fingerlakeswoodturners.co...Comparison.pdf
                              The CAMI scale seems to have pretty much disappeared here and I expect it's the same in the US. A sleeve of 3M wetordry , for instance, is labeled 400, and only the back of the paper shows it's P400.

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