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  • Tailstock Lock captive wrench.

    I used an old captive wrench and nut from an old craftsman table saw to retrofit to my Logan lathe. The original nut and captive wrench are long gone and the previous owner used whatever he had to make it work.

    This is the work.




    A chunk of pleather to protect the ways is another upgrade. Not mentioned in the video.


    And of course the video.


    Thoughts comments? Do you enjoy workshop projects as entertainment? Do you think my journey to pickup some skills is worth watching?
    Last edited by engineerd3d; 03-21-2018, 07:26 PM.
    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
    Logan 825 - work in progress
    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

  • #2
    I have two of those handles/nuts but they are still being used on band saws. Great idea and I for sure could use something like that on my G0602. It's metric but guess I could make the nut, have seen the handles on eBay for not much money..

    Comment


    • #3
      I have to say that the metal for the nut and wrench is not exactly the highest of caliber. If your going to buy the parts, at least make sure they are steel.
      12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
      Logan 825 - work in progress
      My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
      Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
      Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

      Comment


      • #4
        Nicely done, and looks to work just fine.

        The captive wrench on my lathes work the opposite way, it's engaged on the nut all of the time and you lift it to disengage and reposition if you need to get more swing. Once you get it in the right place it goes from locked to moving freely without having to disengage and reposition. I'm not sure either way is more correct than the other though. They clearly both work.

        Comment


        • #5
          Originally posted by engineerd3d View Post
          I have to say that the metal for the nut and wrench is not exactly the highest of caliber. If your going to buy the parts, at least make sure they are steel.
          The nut is steel and the handle is cast aluminum, plenty strong for it's use, this makes no sense.

          I am using a box end wrench left over from an old Japanese motorcycle tool kit on my G0602 but it will fall off. If I could find a metric all thread coupling nut the right size I could easily make the nut. Off to the shop to measure the size of that thread...

          Comment


          • #6
            Originally posted by BobinOK View Post
            The nut is steel and the handle is cast aluminum, plenty strong for it's use, this makes no sense.

            I am using a box end wrench left over from an old Japanese motorcycle tool kit on my G0602 but it will fall off. If I could find a metric all thread coupling nut the right size I could easily make the nut. Off to the shop to measure the size of that thread...
            After looking at the design I'm tempted to weld or braze an appropriate washer to the box wrench that's on the tailstock of my larger lathe. Then add a collar the height of the wrench to raise the nut. Once trapped under the nut it should work just like the the one from the old table saw.
            At the end of the project, there is a profound difference between spare parts and left over parts.

            Location: SF East Bay.

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            • #7
              Kinda what I am planning. Have the coupling nut on the way, M12 X 1.75 X 38mm, will cut it to length and turn one end down to make the spacer. Will probably weld a thick washer to one side of the 19mm motorcycle wrench I am now using. Good idea on the spacer/collar, should have read your post before I ordered the coupling nut.

              Comment


              • #8
                Originally posted by BobinOK View Post
                The nut is steel and the handle is cast aluminum, plenty strong for it's use, this makes no sense.

                I am using a box end wrench left over from an old Japanese motorcycle tool kit on my G0602 but it will fall off. If I could find a metric all thread coupling nut the right size I could easily make the nut. Off to the shop to measure the size of that thread...
                This nut above is some fairly soft metal. It machines like brass, I had to shorten it by 1/8th to give it a flat register on the bottom. The handle is pot metal I think.
                12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
                Logan 825 - work in progress
                My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
                Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
                Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

                Comment


                • #9
                  Originally posted by engineerd3d View Post
                  This nut above is some fairly soft metal. It machines like brass, I had to shorten it by 1/8th to give it a flat register on the bottom. The handle is pot metal I think.
                  Different stuff than what is on my Sears band saws, both parts are chromed cast steel. Could be because both my band saws were built in the 60's.

                  Like This

                  Comment


                  • #10
                    Originally posted by BobinOK View Post
                    Different stuff than what is on my Sears band saws, both parts are chromed cast steel. Could be because both my band saws were built in the 60's.

                    Like This
                    That certainly looks like it's made of steel. If so the price for those parts is very good and would work well on a lathe.
                    12x16" Delta 3d printer (Built from scratch)
                    Logan 825 - work in progress
                    My Blog - http://engineerd3d.ddns.net/
                    Youtube Channel - https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCVY...view_as=public
                    Instagram - https://www.instagram.com/engineerd3d/?hl=en

                    Comment

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