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  • Unknown KD tool?

    It's taken me a couple of weeks to clean, organize two tool boxes of tools and I ran across this I can't identify. Apex Tool Co. bought K-D tool, I emailed and even they don't know what it is.
    It's marked "K-D MFG. NO. 361
    Made in USA "
    It's 2 1/2" long, 3/4" across. One end recessed 1/2", 1/2" deep, not threaded.
    Other end tapered and domed. Anyone know what it is? Thanks!

    Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk

  • #2
    The domed end looks like a striking face.
    It could be some specialty tool for dealer level service like a dowel pin driver for one particular job on an engine/trans/whatever. Dealerships are full of special tools that would make you say "WTF is this" if you never saw them before.

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    • #3
      A tool to pound on to shock a small engine flywheel loose from the crankshaft ?

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      • #4
        Looks almost like a handle for something. I agree that the domed end looks like a striking face. Weird dimensions for a recess meant to hold a tool though. Maybe something meant to fit over the outer race of a bearing so it can be tapped into place?

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        • #5
          I have a flywheel tool just like that.

          BYW, does not work worth a tinker's curse. I use a puller when possible.
          CNC machines only go through the motions

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          • #6
            It looks like a crimping tool to crimp the edge of the hole of a Model A when a new wheel stud was inserted into the brake drum/spindle assembly. This prevented the drum from coming off when wheel was removed

            Sarge41

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            • #7
              That's a long time discontinued item.
              My old KD catalog lists the item numbers in numerical order in the back of the book, it jumps from 298 to 379.
              KD had a lot of knick nack items, if they weren't big sellers they would discontinue them.
              I remember a lot of KD stuff that sat on the spinning display rack at the local auto parts store and collected dust.
              They did have a lot of very good useful specialty tools. Apparently #361 wasn't one of them.

              JL...............
              Last edited by JoeLee; 03-24-2018, 07:30 PM.

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              • #8
                Wheel lock remover. JR

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                • #9
                  Its a flywheel remover for older Briggs & Stratton engones that have the screw on type clutch for the recoil starter. You unscrew the clutch and put that tool over the stub on end of
                  the crankshaft and hit it with a hammer & flywheel will pop off the crank taper.

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                  • #10
                    Many decades ago we used a similar idea on the old outboard motors with ignitions under the flywheel. You could crank on a 3 stud puller (tapped holes in the flywheel) and either bust a gut, bolt, or a flywheel without success, but a light tap on the top of the puller stud with a 12oz ball pein hammer and the flywheel would pop right off. Thinking about it now, that taper might have been right on the edge of being a locking taper, not that I knew that back then.

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                    • #11
                      Originally posted by Wheels17 View Post
                      Many decades ago we used a similar idea on the old outboard motors with ignitions under the flywheel. You could crank on a 3 stud puller (tapped holes in the flywheel) and either bust a gut, bolt, or a flywheel without success, but a light tap on the top of the puller stud with a 12oz ball pein hammer and the flywheel would pop right off. Thinking about it now, that taper might have been right on the edge of being a locking taper, not that I knew that back then.
                      It's amazing how many folks don't realize this.
                      I've seen lots of guys wrenching while horking their guts out tightening the bajeezus out of puller, and like you say often breaking stuff. When a simple smack with a hammer on the end of the puller's center stud would have popped it apart about 3 turns ago. And stuff isn't flying across the room either when it lets go. LOL
                      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                      Location: British Columbia

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                      • #12
                        Is the inside threaded? I have a bunch, many sizes and threads on the insides. The other end is mushroomed from hammering. I assumed they are for screwing onto threaded studs and driving them out.
                        I picked them up some where and never used them. Just put them away for the day of need.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by Willy View Post
                          It's amazing how many folks don't realize this.
                          I've seen lots of guys wrenching while horking their guts out tightening the bajeezus out of puller, and like you say often breaking stuff. When a simple smack with a hammer on the end of the puller's center stud would have popped it apart about 3 turns ago. And stuff isn't flying across the room either when it lets go. LOL
                          Hmmmm

                          I don't do a lot of that, but the puller has always worked without fuss, and the bang-it tool almost never does. Luck of the draw, I suppose...
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #14
                            Your big worry about smacking on the crankshafts of little engines is the fact that you can bust a main thruster casting very easy esp. on smaller high performance engines where weight is critical (chainsaws and the like)

                            very minimal cast webbing in this direction as most goes to the way mains are "normally loaded"

                            so --- two pointers if you must break out the kinetic improviser,

                            1st off - go extremely small as in very,

                            2nd - hang the engine so that gravity has it's way with the crank, now you at least have free-play aiding in the initial "crack loose" as the crank accelerates and the flywheels mass is against the gravity,

                            believe me - iv seen the "seasoned professionals" doing the exact opposite and beating against the engine case with the crank resting on it then scratching their heads wondering why the flywheel wont "pop"

                            second thought --- make the former suggestions #2 and #3 and the 1st one to use a puller,,, and don't forget - mild pressure on the puller then hang it so the crank is gravity fed and you would not believe how small a tap with a tiny little ball peen it takes to get the rig off...

                            I will add this for the tap happy people who may be working on something that they cannot "turn upside down" like maybe on a fixed horizontal engine of sorts, you would then need to physically "load" the crank in the opposite direction of the tapping, as in one arm reaching around and pushing on the drive end of the crank,

                            another important thing is to just keep a repetitive same mild level tapping , not have the mindset of - damn it did not come off with that force so i'll just use more - and more - and more...

                            tapers can take time - and some engines do not have much end-play to work with, so be patient...
                            Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-25-2018, 12:56 AM.

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                            • #15
                              Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                              Hmmmm

                              I don't do a lot of that, but the puller has always worked without fuss, and the bang-it tool almost never does. Luck of the draw, I suppose...
                              Works for me almost every time, bit of a firm preload with the puller, then just a firm little tap and off it pops. It has been my go-to technique for decades. If whatever does not release initially I preload the puller a bit tighter then strike the end again. It always pops off when struck, hardly ever when just tightening only. The harmonics of the shock wave have a pronounced effect on the release process.

                              Much like releasing a machine taper in that once a drawbar has been loosened the taper just needs a small tap to fall free. R-8 tapers, JT and MT tapers much the same. Just a straight pull takes a lot more effort to get them to let go. Don't think I'd like to try it that way.

                              Maybe it's how I hold my tongue while doing so that imparts the magic.
                              Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                              Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                              Location: British Columbia

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