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  • #16
    Well, the issue of using both is that the puller goes right where you'd want to put the tap-on-it tool.

    Yes, I've taken up on the puller and then tapped on nearly anything handy and had it pop loose well enough. Just never had one pop off by the tap-on-it tool alone. It always made sense to me, and I had the engine free to move, but nothing doing.

    You're probably right.... didn't hold my mouth right. Embouchure is everything.
    CNC machines only go through the motions

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    • #17
      Just never had one pop off by the tap-on-it tool alone

      Likewise, not unless there was another force assisting, whether a pry bar or gravity, only a puller by another name.
      Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
      Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

      Location: British Columbia

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      • #18
        Getting back to the original question, an old time sheet metal worker I knew had a number of tools like this, only smaller diameter. This was back in the day when sheet metal tanks were cold riveted together. He'd put a rivet through the 2 plates, then use a tool like this, with a hollow end, to pop over the rivet shank, and give it a smart tap with a hammer, to make sure the 2 plates were seated together before knocking the rivet down.
        I don't think this is meant for that, though, not at 1/2" dia. Special purpose tool for tapping a bearing over the end of a shaft possibly.
        'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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        • #19
          Thanks guys! I remember buying and using it but that was maybe 40 years ago. Flywheel and things I have a variety of pullers, I have used the whack method, usually after some penetrating oil, sometimes heating flywheel a little while cooling crank (blow off spray can held upside down works...freon propellant).
          Maybe I'll use that tool in 40 years again!

          Sent from my SM-S320VL using Tapatalk

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          • #20
            It looks like it would be handy for installing axle pushnuts or similar.

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            • #21
              used to install new valve guides in cly. heads. When placed over the new guide it limited the proper depth it was to be installed.At least that was what thy told us when we made them. yep worked for them a few years.

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              • #22
                This makes a lot of sense.
                Cylinder head specific but KD did make a lot of specialized tools. Every factory automotive shop manual I have has a pictorial list of all of the specialized tooling required for each section, some of the tooling can be pretty hard to figure out unless one just happens to recognize it.

                There have got to be literally thousands in the automotive trade alone never mind other industries.
                Always interesting though to find out where these little gems originated. Thankfully we have a pretty divergent group here with a broad base of life experiences.
                Home, down in the valley behind the Red Angus
                Bad Decisions Make Good Stories​

                Location: British Columbia

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                • #23
                  Any tool that gets put over another round part, and then hit with a hammer, is likely to look much the same as any other that is used the same way. Valve guide setter, flywheel tool, might look just the same other than the size of the recess. Some might be the same thing with a different number on it.

                  KD seems associated with automotive in my mind, more than small engine, but I don't know that they never made small engine tools.
                  CNC machines only go through the motions

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                  • #24
                    Originally posted by J Tiers View Post
                    BYW, does not work worth a tinker's curse. I use a puller when possible.
                    IIRC the original expression was a tinker's "dam", not a "damn". It came from the itinerant pot/pan repairmen who would re-solder broken vessels and would make a small barrier of damp clay to constrain solder flow. So the "tinker's dam" was just dirt that was thrown away but available anywhere - sure not worth much.
                    .
                    "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                    • #25
                      It seems that 'tinkers curse' or 'tinkers cuss' was recorded as being used earlier than 'tinkers dam' which is now thought to be a Victorian way of avoiding the use of 'damn'.
                      'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                      • #26
                        I've no idea what the intended purpose of the OP's device is, but looking at it, I've decided to make up a couple of similar pieces and press them onto one end of a couple of the brass bars that I often use for tapping on things that I don't want to mar. A steel "whap cap" will keep the end of the brass from mushrooming out.

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                        • #27
                          Originally posted by Richard P Wilson View Post
                          It seems that 'tinkers curse' or 'tinkers cuss' was recorded as being used earlier than 'tinkers dam' which is now thought to be a Victorian way of avoiding the use of 'damn'.
                          I think that curses were so common with tinkers that they were "given away free" to any within hearing.....hence not worth anything...

                          Old sayings are fun.... so many ways they could have come about, and almost no way to decide HOW that happened way back whenever, as those folks may have been dead for over a hundred years, perhaps. Even mention in literature is likely not a good indicator.

                          How long has it taken for slang to get into writings even now? Less time now than ever before, but in prior times, could be many years or even decades. Much slang originated in a "cockney", a sub-language used by a group, often a criminal sub-group, to allow speaking without being understood by others. Like the examples Sir John mentioned, as "Donald" or "Donald Duck" (truck).
                          CNC machines only go through the motions

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                          • #28
                            I thought Cockney Slang is from a certain region..
                            Nice legs.....
                            Shame about her boat race..

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                            • #29
                              Then the next interesting layer is some of the origin stories that get booted around that are clear later fictions. There was one about the phrase "freeze the balls off a brass monkey" with a long winded explanation of a brass fixture on shipboard used to hold cannon balls. Then another about archers and middle fingers and a bow reference to pluck "yew". It's hard enough to unpack layers of change like the proposed Victorian shift without modern creative writers muddying the water.
                              .
                              "People will occasionally stumble over the truth, but most of the time they will pick themselves up and carry on" : Winston Churchill

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                              • #30
                                Originally posted by 754 View Post
                                I thought Cockney Slang is from a certain region..
                                .....
                                Yes. The term has also been used for local dialects of certain types. And for "created" dialects, which the rhyming slang is. Straight London "cockney" is supposed to be derived from a kentish accent, at least as I have heard it said. My knowledge of British accent varieties is not extensive.

                                The point was not to get off on that subject, but that old sayings and slang in general usually makes it into more mainstream speech after it has started to go out of favor among the originators. And if it has not yet, then after it gets out into mainstream speech it is quickly abandoned by the originators. What your kids use is no longer useful once the parents start with it.

                                So, since that went slower in past centuries (when people could live their whole life in one village, and usually did), slang passed into common speech slower, and any attempt to trace back historically is probably decades or even a hundred years from the actual source.

                                So probably, any explanation of the origin is pure BS, in other than special cases where the saying is specific to an industry or occupation, with a particular derivation.
                                CNC machines only go through the motions

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