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Semi OT - fine art mystery tool

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  • Semi OT - fine art mystery tool

    I was in an art museum the other day looking at a classical painting called Venus disarms Mars. In it, Venus is disrobing Mars, the God of war and amongst the scattered items like armor, arrows, and muskets was this little doodad. Anyone know what it is?

  • #2
    Looks like a narrow set of roles or what some people call a ring roller. One end has a clamp to mount it onto a bench and the other has an adjustment screw to set the gap between the roles. The handle rotates one of the disks.

    Or maybe it is part of an antique ice cream machine.
    Last edited by loose nut; 03-24-2018, 05:56 PM.
    The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

    Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

    Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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    • #3
      Don’t ring rollers need 3 rollers?

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      • #4
        That said, Mars as the God of War and with an arrow in the background I’d guess an artist’s conception of a winding mechanism for a crossbow.

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        • #5
          I didn't say it was a good roller. Maybe the artist didn't actually know what a set of roles looked like.

          Maybe it is used to flatten metal??? or make ice cream.
          The shortest distance between two points is a circle of infinite diameter.

          Bluewater Model Engineering Society at https://sites.google.com/site/bluewatermes/

          Southwestern Ontario. Canada

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          • #6
            For making antique ice cream.

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            • #7
              You could make one from that, it seems to have a table clamp, screw down drive train, the works, I'd guess the artist was very familiar with it, aren't oil paints milled through a roll?, perhaps this is the pigment roll, just a guess, hell of a painting.
              Mark

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              • #8
                It is amonst other tools, there is a pair of end nippers and some other things. The crossbow is off to the left in that picture, so it seems to belong among the tools rather than the weapons. And there appears to be a winder over near the crossbow, if you request a higher res download.

                http://www.getty.edu/art/collection/...out-1610-1612/

                But you will have to ask the artist, which poses a bit of a problem now.
                Last edited by J Tiers; 03-24-2018, 06:52 PM.
                CNC machines only go through the motions

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                • #9
                  Rolling mill.

                  https://www.esslinger.com/compact-ec...BoCCYEQAvD_BwE

                  since I don't have a photo hosting site.
                  Kevin

                  More tools than sense.

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                  • #10
                    Originally posted by Commander_Chaos View Post
                    I was in an art museum the other day looking at a classical painting called Venus disarms Mars. In it, Venus is disrobing Mars, the God of war and amongst the scattered items like armor, arrows, and muskets was this little doodad. Anyone know what it is?
                    A quick peak at JT's link and it Looks more like Mars is disrobing Venus to me




                    but - all i can tell you is two things, That the two gears turn in opposite directions and that there is no mechanical advantage of using it to "wind" something ---- and the large internal flats give credit to those saying it's some kind of roller of some sorts - that's indeed the business part of it with what might look like an adjustment at the top to increase or decrease the pressure...
                    Last edited by A.K. Boomer; 03-24-2018, 11:19 PM.

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                    • #11
                      I agree with Kevin's rolling mill.

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                      • #12
                        Originally posted by KJ1I View Post
                        Rolling mill.

                        https://www.esslinger.com/compact-ec...BoCCYEQAvD_BwE

                        since I don't have a photo hosting site.
                        Seems very likely to be just that, table-top clamp at the far end, which would be the lower end. Roll pressure adjuster at the near end. What seems to be a poor finish on the rolls is probably the artist's rendition of grooves for wire.

                        Question, why are so many old hand cranks made with a curve like that, even into the 1930's and later? They're seen on all kinds of hand-cranked devices, cream separators. seed cleaners, geared grinding wheels and so on.
                        Last edited by cameron; 03-25-2018, 12:23 AM.

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                        • #13
                          Originally posted by cameron View Post
                          ... Question, why are so many old hand cranks made with a curve like that, even into the 1930's and later? They're seen on all kinds of hand-cranked devices, cream separators. seed cleaners, geared grinding wheels and so on.
                          Wild guess... straight has to be straight, or it looks bad. But, any old curve is a curve and can look good so long as the proportions are sort of right. If you're beating things out with a hammer, single non-matching and obvious curves have to be the easiest/quickest to achieve. If I had to pound out 30 crank arms, I'd go with the easiest way possible and I doubt any of them would even approach straight... no matter how hard I tried.

                          David...
                          http://fixerdave.blogspot.com/

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                          • #14
                            Strange that its in a painting dated 1610 or thereabouts. If I'd been shown the tool in isolation and asked to date it, from its use of screw threads and gears, iron casting for the handle (just look at the rib down the middle, don't think thats a forging), I'd have said mid to late 19th century. Yes, I know they had screw threads and gears and castings in the early 17th century, but much harder to make, and much less common. It just looks later. And no, I don't know what its for. Flattening something narrow is my best guess.
                            'It may not always be the best policy to do what is best technically, but those responsible for policy can never form a right judgement without knowledge of what is right technically' - 'Dutch' Kindelberger

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                            • #15
                              You're all way off. It's a can opener from 300 years before cans were invented.

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